Government and politics

In this July 13, 2017 photo, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y. pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Congressional Democrats announced Saturday that a bipartisan group of House and Senate negotiators have reached an agreement on a sweeping Russia sanctions package to punish Moscow for meddling in the presidential election and its military aggression in Ukraine and Syria. Schumer called the sanctions legislation "strong" and he expected the legislation to be passed promptly. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 23, 2017 - 12:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led House is set to vote soon on a sweeping Russia sanctions package that defies the White House by demanding that President Donald Trump get Congress' permission before lifting or easing the economic penalties against Moscow. Lawmakers are scheduled to consider the...
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In this July 13, 2017 photo, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y. pauses during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Congressional Democrats announced Saturday that a bipartisan group of House and Senate negotiators have reached an agreement on a sweeping Russia sanctions package to punish Moscow for meddling in the presidential election and its military aggression in Ukraine and Syria. Schumer called the sanctions legislation "strong" and he expected the legislation to be passed promptly. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
July 23, 2017 - 12:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led House is set to vote soon on a sweeping Russia sanctions package that defies the White House by demanding that President Donald Trump get Congress' permission before lifting or easing the economic penalties against Moscow. Lawmakers are scheduled to consider the...
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FILE - In this Monday, July 17, 2017 file photo, Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergei Kislyak arrives at the State Department in Washington to meet with Undersecretary of State Thomas Shannon. The Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergei Kislyak, a prominent figure in the controversy over Russia's possible involvement in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, has ended his assignment in Washington. The Russian Embassy in Washington announced on Twitter that Kislyak's tenure ended on Saturday, July 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
July 23, 2017 - 11:00 am
MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergei Kislyak, a prominent figure in the controversy over Russia's possible involvement in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, has ended his assignment in Washington. The Russian Embassy in Washington announced on Twitter that Kislyak's...
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FILE - In this Monday, July 17, 2017 file photo, Russian Ambassador to the U.S. Sergei Kislyak arrives at the State Department in Washington to meet with Undersecretary of State Thomas Shannon. The Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergei Kislyak, a prominent figure in the controversy over Russia's possible involvement in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, has ended his assignment in Washington. The Russian Embassy in Washington announced on Twitter that Kislyak's tenure ended on Saturday, July 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
July 23, 2017 - 11:00 am
MOSCOW (AP) — The Russian ambassador to the United States, Sergei Kislyak, a prominent figure in the controversy over Russia's possible involvement in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, has ended his assignment in Washington. The Russian Embassy in Washington announced on Twitter that Kislyak's...
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In this July 18, 2017 photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. There are many reasons why the Senate will probably reject Republicans’ crowning bill razing much of “Obamacare.” There are fewer why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell might revive it and avert a GOP humiliation. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
July 23, 2017 - 8:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — There are many reasons why the Senate will probably reject Republicans' crowning bill razing much of former President Barack Obama's health care law. There are fewer why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell might revive it and avert a GOP humiliation. Leaders say the Senate will...
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In this July 18, 2017 photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. There are many reasons why the Senate will probably reject Republicans’ crowning bill razing much of “Obamacare.” There are fewer why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell might revive it and avert a GOP humiliation. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
July 23, 2017 - 8:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — There are many reasons why the Senate will probably reject Republicans' crowning bill razing much of former President Barack Obama's health care law. There are fewer why Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell might revive it and avert a GOP humiliation. Leaders say the Senate will...
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FILE - In this Thursday July 20, 2017 file photo, EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, right, and British Secretary of State David Davis address the media after a week of negotiations at EU headquarters in Brussels. Since the June 8 British election, there has been a disunited British government, and an increasingly impatient EU. Officials of the bloc have slammed British proposals so far as vague and inadequate. There's also a fight looming over the multibillion-euro bill Britain must pay to meet previous commitments it made as an EU member. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson blustered recently that the bloc could "go whistle" if it thought Britain would settle a big exit tab. EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier replied: "I am mot hearing any whistling. Just the clock ticking."(AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert, file)
July 23, 2017 - 6:01 am
LONDON (AP) — Lucy Harris thinks Britain's decision to leave the European Union is a dream come true. Nick Hopkinson thinks it's a nightmare. The two Britons — a "leave" supporter and a "remainer" — represent the great divide in a country that stepped into the unknown just over a year ago, when...
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FILE - In this Thursday July 20, 2017 file photo, EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier, right, and British Secretary of State David Davis address the media after a week of negotiations at EU headquarters in Brussels. Since the June 8 British election, there has been a disunited British government, and an increasingly impatient EU. Officials of the bloc have slammed British proposals so far as vague and inadequate. There's also a fight looming over the multibillion-euro bill Britain must pay to meet previous commitments it made as an EU member. British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson blustered recently that the bloc could "go whistle" if it thought Britain would settle a big exit tab. EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier replied: "I am mot hearing any whistling. Just the clock ticking."(AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert, file)
July 23, 2017 - 6:01 am
LONDON (AP) — Lucy Harris thinks Britain's decision to leave the European Union is a dream come true. Nick Hopkinson thinks it's a nightmare. The two Britons — a "leave" supporter and a "remainer" — represent the great divide in a country that stepped into the unknown just over a year ago, when...
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President Donald Trump waves as he boards Air Force One, Saturday, July 22, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to Naval Air Station Norfolk, in Norfolk, Va., to attend the commissioning ceremony of the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 23, 2017 - 12:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Saturday that he has "complete power" to issue pardons, an assertion that comes amid investigations into Russian interference in last year's presidential election. It was one of many topics that appeared to occupy the president's mind as the day broke...
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President Donald Trump waves as he boards Air Force One, Saturday, July 22, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to Naval Air Station Norfolk, in Norfolk, Va., to attend the commissioning ceremony of the aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78). (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
July 23, 2017 - 12:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump and his tweet barrage (all times local): 12:40 a.m. One of President Trump's personal attorneys says that Trump's private legal team is not looking into the question of whether the president can pardon himself. Jay Sekulow tells reporters in...
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