Health

FILE - In this May 20, 2019, file photo photo head of cultivation at Loving Kindness Farms Jason Roberts checks one of his marijuana plants in a grow room wearing green lights not to wake them wake them during their night cycle in Gardena, Calif. A new study shoots down the notion that medical marijuana laws can prevent opioid overdose deaths. Chelsea Shover of Stanford University School of Medicine and colleagues reported the findings Monday, June 10, in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
June 10, 2019 - 3:23 pm
A new study shoots down the notion that medical marijuana laws can prevent opioid overdose deaths, challenging a favorite talking point of legal pot advocates. Researchers repeated an analysis that sparked excitement years ago. The previous work linked medical marijuana laws to slower than expected...
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FILE - This Dec. 13, 2016, file photo, shows the former Anaconda smelter smokestack behind sculptures of miners at the Anaconda Smelter Stack State Park viewing area in Anaconda, Montana. Residents in the nearby community of Opportunity are suing to get the Atlantic Richfield Co. to do a more thorough cleanup of arsenic in residential yards. The Montana Supreme Court ruled in December 2017 that they could move forward with their 2008 lawsuit. Arco appealed, arguing a state lawsuit shouldn't be able to interfere with an ongoing cleanup. The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday, June 10, 2019, it will hear the appeal. (AP Photo/Matt Volz, File)
June 10, 2019 - 2:45 pm
BUTTE, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether residents of two Montana communities can continue their decade-long effort to get the Atlantic Richfield Co. to pay for a more thorough cleanup of arsenic left on properties after a century of copper smelting. The Montana Supreme Court...
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June 10, 2019 - 6:05 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A historically black college in Tennessee is planning to research the impact of electronic cigarettes and vaping with a grant from vaping device maker JUUL Labs. Meharry Medical College in Nashville says that it and JUUL Labs have structured the $7.5 million grant in ways...
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FILE - In this May 20, 2019, file photo, Oralia Sandoval, center, holds her son Benjamin, 6, as she participates in an Immigrants Day of Action rally in Sacramento, Calif. California will become the first state to pay for some adults living in the country illegally to have full health benefits as the solidly liberal bastion continues to distance itself from President Donald Trump's administration. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
June 10, 2019 - 12:01 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Some low-income adults in California living in the country illegally will soon get their health benefits paid for by taxpayers. Democrats in the state Legislature on Sunday agreed to make adults between the ages of 19 and 25 eligible for the state's Medicaid program. Only...
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FILE - In this May 20, 2019, file photo, Oralia Sandoval, center, holds her son Benjamin, 6, as she participates in an Immigrants Day of Action rally in Sacramento, Calif. California will become the first state to pay for some adults living in the country illegally to have full health benefits as the solidly liberal bastion continues to distance itself from President Donald Trump's administration. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
June 09, 2019 - 10:56 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will become the first state to pay for some adults living in the country illegally to have full health benefits as the solidly liberal bastion continues to resist the policies of Republican President Donald Trump's administration. Democrats in the state...
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June 09, 2019 - 8:08 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California will become the first state in the country to pay for some adults living in the country illegally to have full health benefits as the solidly liberal state continues to distance itself from President Donald Trump's administration. Democrats in the state...
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This May 30, 2019 photo shows Skye Post, who will be a junior at Monmouth University this fall, taking an ocean water sample near a storm drain outfall pipe on the beach in Long Branch, N.J. University researchers are studying the relationship between heavy rainfall and elevated levels of bacteria from animal waste that gets flushed into storm sewers and out in the ocean at popular surfing beaches at the Jersey shore.(AP Photo/Wayne Parry)
June 09, 2019 - 8:27 am
LONG BRANCH, N.J. (AP) — Most surfers know it's best to avoid surfing near pipes that dump storm water into the ocean soon after a storm, due to the increased chance of getting sick from bacteria that enter the surf. Many do it anyway because the periods just after storms often bring bigger waves,...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017 file photo, activists dressed as characters from "The Handmaid's Tale" chant in the Texas Capitol Rotunda as they protest SB8, a bill that would require health care facilities, including hospitals and abortion clinics, to bury or cremate any fetal remains whether from abortion, miscarriage or stillbirth, and they would be banned from donating aborted fetal tissue to medical researchers in Austin. Tissue left over from elective abortions has been used in scientific research for decades, and is credited with leading to lifesaving vaccines and other advances. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
June 08, 2019 - 7:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — To save babies from brain-damaging birth defects, University of Pittsburgh scientist Carolyn Coyne studies placentas from fetuses that otherwise would be discarded — and she's worried this kind of research is headed for the chopping block. The Trump administration is cracking down...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017 file photo, activists dressed as characters from "The Handmaid's Tale" chant in the Texas Capitol Rotunda as they protest SB8, a bill that would require health care facilities, including hospitals and abortion clinics, to bury or cremate any fetal remains whether from abortion, miscarriage or stillbirth, and they would be banned from donating aborted fetal tissue to medical researchers in Austin. Tissue left over from elective abortions has been used in scientific research for decades, and is credited with leading to lifesaving vaccines and other advances. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
June 08, 2019 - 9:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are feeling the chill of the Trump administration's crackdown on fetal tissue research. Tissue left over from abortions has long been used in lifesaving research. New restrictions are ending such work at the National Institutes of Health. University scientists worry...
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June 07, 2019 - 9:27 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Health officials on Friday said they're still seeking answers from Missouri's only abortion clinic about why some patients were unaware that they remained pregnant after what the agency described as "failed surgical abortions." The state Department of Health and Senior...
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