Health

FILE - In this April 6, 2017 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks from his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats plan to slow the Senate’s work, force votes and make late-night speeches in an effort to focus attention on how Republicans are crafting legislation revamping the nation’s health care system behind closed doors, a senior Democratic aide said Monday, June 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
June 19, 2017 - 7:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They threatened to slow the Senate's work with procedural motions. They forced the chamber's top Republican to swat aside reasonable sounding requests, like holding committee hearings. And they delivered speech after speech after speech. Democrats used all those tools Monday...
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FILE - In this April 6, 2017 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks from his office on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats plan to slow the Senate’s work, force votes and make late-night speeches in an effort to focus attention on how Republicans are crafting legislation revamping the nation’s health care system behind closed doors, a senior Democratic aide said Monday, June 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
June 19, 2017 - 7:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — They threatened to slow the Senate's work with procedural motions. They forced the chamber's top Republican to swat aside reasonable sounding requests, like holding committee hearings. And they delivered speech after speech after speech. Democrats used all those tools Monday...
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FILE - This Oct. 19, 2016, file photo shows the packaging of Vivitrol at an addiction treatment center in Joliet, Ill. A new study finds only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance. The research suggests that doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth in the opioid addiction epidemic. The study was published Monday, June 19, 2017, in JAMA Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Carla K. Johnson, File)
June 19, 2017 - 1:48 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance, according to a study that suggests doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth caught up in the worst addiction crisis in U.S. history. "...
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FILE - This Oct. 19, 2016, file photo shows the packaging of Vivitrol at an addiction treatment center in Joliet, Ill. A new study finds only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance. The research suggests that doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth in the opioid addiction epidemic. The study was published Monday, June 19, 2017, in JAMA Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Carla K. Johnson, File)
June 19, 2017 - 1:48 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance, according to a study that suggests doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth caught up in the worst addiction crisis in U.S. history. "...
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FILE - In this June 16, 2017, file photo, a man runs through section of South Mountain Park at sunrise to avoid the excessive heat in Phoenix. A record heat wave is rolling into Arizona, Nevada and California, threatening to bring 120-degree temperatures to Phoenix by early next week. The southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees in Phoenix _ a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
June 19, 2017 - 10:30 am
PHOENIX (AP) — The Southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years. The broiling temperatures will also be felt in Las Vegas and Southern California, creating a...
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FILE - In this June 16, 2017, file photo, a man runs through section of South Mountain Park at sunrise to avoid the excessive heat in Phoenix. A record heat wave is rolling into Arizona, Nevada and California, threatening to bring 120-degree temperatures to Phoenix by early next week. The southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees in Phoenix _ a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
June 19, 2017 - 10:30 am
PHOENIX (AP) — The Southwestern U.S. is about to feel the wrath of a punishing heat wave that includes a forecast of 120 degrees in Phoenix — a temperature not seen in the desert city in more than 20 years. The broiling temperatures will also be felt in Las Vegas and Southern California, creating a...
Read More
FILE - This Sunday, March 29, 2015, file photo provided by the Jefferson Police Department shows a gun involved in the accidental shooting of a 3-year-old in Jefferson, Ga. Shootings kill or injure at least 19 U.S. children each day, with boys, teenagers and blacks most at risk, according to a government study that paints a bleak portrait of persistent violence. The analysis of 2002-14 U.S. data that involves children and teens through age 17 was published Monday, June 19, 2017, in the journal Pediatrics. (Jefferson Police Department via AP, File)
June 19, 2017 - 9:54 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Shootings kill or injure at least 19 U.S. children each day, with boys, teenagers and blacks most at risk, according to a government study that paints a bleak portrait of persistent violence. The analysis of 2002-14 U.S. data is billed as the most comprehensive study on the topic...
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FILE - This Sunday, March 29, 2015, file photo provided by the Jefferson Police Department shows a gun involved in the accidental shooting of a 3-year-old in Jefferson, Ga. Shootings kill or injure at least 19 U.S. children each day, with boys, teenagers and blacks most at risk, according to a government study that paints a bleak portrait of persistent violence. The analysis of 2002-14 U.S. data that involves children and teens through age 17 was published Monday, June 19, 2017, in the journal Pediatrics. (Jefferson Police Department via AP, File)
June 19, 2017 - 9:54 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Shootings kill or injure at least 19 U.S. children each day, with boys, teenagers and blacks most at risk, according to a government study that paints a bleak portrait of persistent violence. The analysis of 2002-14 U.S. data is billed as the most comprehensive study on the topic...
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In this Thursday, June 15, 2017, photo, people walk inside the Oculus, the new transit station at the World Trade Center in New York. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting 10,000 New Yorkers early next year for a study so sweeping it’s called “The Human Project.” They’ll be asked to share a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years. The idea is to channel different data streams into a river of insight on health, aging, education and many other aspects of human life. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
June 19, 2017 - 9:22 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Wanted: 10,000 New Yorkers interested in advancing science by sharing a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting participants from across the...
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In this Thursday, June 15, 2017, photo, people walk inside the Oculus, the new transit station at the World Trade Center in New York. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting 10,000 New Yorkers early next year for a study so sweeping it’s called “The Human Project.” They’ll be asked to share a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years. The idea is to channel different data streams into a river of insight on health, aging, education and many other aspects of human life. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
June 19, 2017 - 9:22 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Wanted: 10,000 New Yorkers interested in advancing science by sharing a trove of personal information, from cellphone locations and credit-card swipes to blood samples and life-changing events. For 20 years. Researchers are gearing up to start recruiting participants from across the...
Read More

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