Health

A worker sprays an adhesive product on the ground to gather up the lead particles in the school yard of Saint Benoit primary school in Paris, France, Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019. Workers have started decontaminating some Paris schools tested with unsafe levels of lead following the blaze at the Notre Dame Cathedral, as part of efforts to protect children from risks of lead poisoning. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
August 09, 2019 - 12:19 pm
PARIS (AP) — Paris regional authorities say decontamination and cleanup work at Notre Dame cathedral will resume on Aug. 19 after new equipment and stricter safety procedures ensure workers are not exposed to unsafe levels of lead. The administration suspended the job of removing hazardous...
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Carolyn Tuft, poses for a photograph, Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019, in Salt Lake City. Tuft survived a 2007 mass shooting in Utah and said she has lead poisoning from shotgun pellets still in her body, leaving her with debilitating headaches, nausea and other serious health problems. Tuft, whose 15-year-old daughter died in the Trolley Square mall shooting in Salt Lake City, has been unable to work, resulting in the loss of her home and business, she told The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 08, 2019 - 9:33 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A woman who survived a 2007 mass shooting in Utah said Thursday she has lead poisoning from 300 shotgun pellets still in her body, leaving her with debilitating headaches, nausea and other serious health problems. Carolyn Tuft, whose 15-year-old daughter died in the Trolley...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 1:42 pm
GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious. "...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 9:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 3:10 p.m. A manager in the U.N. Climate Change secretariat who helped write a new report on the subject, said the grueling work by the volunteer authors was "like a dentist's appointment for six days"...
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A worker sprays an adhesive product on the ground to gather up the lead particles in the school yard of Saint Benoit primary school in Paris, France, Thursday, Aug. 8, 2019. Workers have started decontaminating some Paris schools tested with unsafe levels of lead following the blaze at the Notre Dame Cathedral, as part of efforts to protect children from risks of lead poisoning. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
August 08, 2019 - 9:05 am
PARIS (AP) — Workers in full protective gear began Thursday to decontaminate some Paris schools tested with unsafe levels of lead following the blaze at the Notre Dame Cathedral, as part of efforts to protect children from risks of lead poisoning. Paris authorities ordered last month a deep clean...
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FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2019, file photo, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Administrator Seema Verma speaks during a news conference in Washington. Expanding access to a promising but costly treatment, Medicare said Aug. 7, it will cover for some blood cancers a breakthrough gene therapy that revs up a patient’s own immune cells to destroy malignancies. Verma said the decision will provide consistent and predictable access nationwide, opening up treatment options for some patients "who had nowhere else to turn." (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf, File)
August 07, 2019 - 6:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expanding access to a promising but costly treatment, Medicare said Wednesday it will cover for some blood cancers a breakthrough gene therapy that revs up a patient's own immune cells to destroy malignancies. Officials said Medicare will cover CAR-T cell therapies for certain...
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Notre Dame cathedral is silhouetted as environmental groups and unionists attend a news conference to warn against lead particles polluting the air in the area, and ask for a regularly updated chart showing pollution levels in Paris, France, Monday, Aug. 5, 2019. Hundreds of tons of toxic lead in Notre Dame's spire and roof melted during the April fire. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)
August 07, 2019 - 10:26 am
PARIS (AP) — Health officials in Paris said Wednesday that a young boy needs medical monitoring because tests conducted after the Notre Dame Cathedral fire showed that he was at risk of lead poisoning. The child, who was tested last week, doesn't need treatment yet, the Regional Health Authority...
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August 07, 2019 - 5:40 am
KIGALI, Rwanda (AP) — Rwanda and Congo are discouraging travel across their border, as officials try to prevent further spread of the highly contagious Ebola virus. Travel restrictions are part of measures taken by Rwandan and Congolese health officials who met in Rwanda late on Tuesday. According...
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Thomas Uhle, grow manager, tends to marijuana plants growing at GB Sciences Louisiana, in Baton Rouge, La., Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019. Today was the first day the marijuana, which was grown for medical purposes, was processed and shipped to patients in Louisiana. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
August 06, 2019 - 8:34 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — A Marine veteran struggling with PTSD and a woman fighting cancer became some of the first people to purchase medical marijuana in Louisiana on Tuesday, as the state became the first in the Deep South to dispense therapeutic cannabis, four years after state lawmakers agreed...
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This photo provided by Novartis shows their gene therapy medicine Zolgensma. U.S. regulators want to know why Novartis didn't disclose a problem with testing data until after they approved the Swiss drugmaker’s $2.125 million gene therapy. On Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2019, the Food and Drug Administration said the questionable data involves testing of the therapy, Zologensma, on animals, not on patients. (Novartis via AP)
August 06, 2019 - 6:51 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators want to know why Novartis didn't disclose a problem with testing data until after the Swiss drugmaker's $2.1 million gene therapy was approved. The Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday the manipulated data involved testing in animals, not patients, and it's...
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