Health

May 18, 2017 - 6:24 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Health workers are monitoring more than 400 people amid an Ebola outbreak in a remote corner of Congo where already three deaths have been blamed on the virus, the World Health Organization said Thursday. An experimental vaccine has been developed since the West African...
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May 18, 2017 - 6:24 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Health workers are monitoring more than 400 people amid an Ebola outbreak in a remote corner of Congo where already three deaths have been blamed on the virus, the World Health Organization said Thursday. An experimental vaccine has been developed since the West African...
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Judy Bullard, of Old Orchard Beach, Maine, describes her ordeal of living with epilepsy and how she will be adversely affected by the state's proposed changes to the medicaid program during a hearing, Wednesday, May 17, 2017, in Portland, Maine. The state estimates its plan to create work requirements for Medicaid would result in less coverage and higher costs. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
May 17, 2017 - 7:09 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Medicaid recipients in Maine told state regulators Wednesday they shouldn't be forced to work to continue getting their health care benefits as the Republican governor has proposed. The health care bill recently approved by U.S. House Republicans would let states require...
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Judy Bullard, of Old Orchard Beach, Maine, describes her ordeal of living with epilepsy and how she will be adversely affected by the state's proposed changes to the medicaid program during a hearing, Wednesday, May 17, 2017, in Portland, Maine. The state estimates its plan to create work requirements for Medicaid would result in less coverage and higher costs. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
May 17, 2017 - 7:09 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Medicaid recipients in Maine told state regulators Wednesday they shouldn't be forced to work to continue getting their health care benefits as the Republican governor has proposed. The health care bill recently approved by U.S. House Republicans would let states require...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2013 file photo, chemotherapy is administered to a cancer patient via intravenous drip at a hospital in Durham, N.C. According to a study released on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
May 17, 2017 - 5:58 pm
Most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up, a study that taped hundreds of visits at several large hospitals finds. Cancer patients are three times more likely to...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2013 file photo, chemotherapy is administered to a cancer patient via intravenous drip at a hospital in Durham, N.C. According to a study released on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
May 17, 2017 - 5:58 pm
Most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up, a study that taped hundreds of visits at several large hospitals finds. Cancer patients are three times more likely to...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2013 file photo, chemotherapy is administered to a cancer patient via intravenous drip at a hospital in Durham, N.C. According to a study released on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
May 17, 2017 - 5:37 pm
Most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up, a study that taped hundreds of visits at several large hospitals finds. Cancer patients are three times more likely to...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2013 file photo, chemotherapy is administered to a cancer patient via intravenous drip at a hospital in Durham, N.C. According to a study released on Wednesday, May 17, 2017, most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
May 17, 2017 - 5:37 pm
Most doctors did not discuss the cost of cancer treatment with patients, spent less than two minutes on it when they did, and usually did so only after patients brought it up, a study that taped hundreds of visits at several large hospitals finds. Cancer patients are three times more likely to...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013 file photo, gym members use a treadmill to warm up for a morning exercise class in Addison, Texas. A study released on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 suggests that heavy seniors who want to lose pounds safely shouldn’t skip the weight machines or the treadmill. Losing weight plus aerobic activity and strength training improved the health of older obese people more than weight loss plus either type of exercise alone. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
May 17, 2017 - 5:11 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Heavy seniors who want to lose pounds safely shouldn't skip the weight machines or the treadmill, new research suggests. Experts have worried about recommending weight loss to older, obese people because it speeds up bone and muscle loss, increasing the danger of falls and broken...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013 file photo, gym members use a treadmill to warm up for a morning exercise class in Addison, Texas. A study released on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 suggests that heavy seniors who want to lose pounds safely shouldn’t skip the weight machines or the treadmill. Losing weight plus aerobic activity and strength training improved the health of older obese people more than weight loss plus either type of exercise alone. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
May 17, 2017 - 5:11 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Heavy seniors who want to lose pounds safely shouldn't skip the weight machines or the treadmill, new research suggests. Experts have worried about recommending weight loss to older, obese people because it speeds up bone and muscle loss, increasing the danger of falls and broken...
Read More

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