Health

FILE – In this Sept. 20, 2012 file photo, Ray Kemble, of Dimock, Pa., holds a jug of his well water on his head while marching with demonstrators against hydraulic fracturing outside a Marcellus Shale industry conference in Philadelphia. Federal government scientists are collecting water and air samples in the first week of August 2017 from about 25 homes in Dimock, Pa., a tiny, rural crossroads about 150 miles north of Philadelphia that became a flashpoint in the national debate over fracking to investigate ongoing complaints about the quality of the drinking water. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
August 03, 2017 - 8:56 pm
The federal government has returned to a Pennsylvania village that became a flashpoint in the national debate over fracking to investigate ongoing complaints about the quality of the drinking water. Government scientists are collecting water and air samples this week from about 25 homes in Dimock,...
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In this June 27, 2017, photo, Jerred Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary, prepares his monthly tax payment, $40,131.88 in cash in Los Angeles. For Kiloh, the cash is a daily hassle. It needs to be counted repeatedly to safeguard against loss. State and local taxes must be set aside and stored, sometimes for a month or more. When vendors show up, they get paid in cash, too. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 6:57 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — In California and other states where marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use, pot store owners often find themselves nervously carrying around large amounts of cash. That's because most banks want nothing to do with money linked to a plant that remains illegal under...
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In this June 27, 2017, photo, Jerred Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary, prepares his monthly tax payment, $40,131.88 in cash in Los Angeles. For Kiloh, the cash is a daily hassle. It needs to be counted repeatedly to safeguard against loss. State and local taxes must be set aside and stored, sometimes for a month or more. When vendors show up, they get paid in cash, too. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 6:57 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — In California and other states where marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use, pot store owners often find themselves nervously carrying around large amounts of cash. That's because most banks want nothing to do with money linked to a plant that remains illegal under...
Read More
In this June 27, 2017, photo, an employee weighs sifted pot leaves to make joints at the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary owned by Jerred Kiloh in Los Angeles. On a typical day, $15,000 can change hands in Kiloh's dispensary, where a steady stream of customers pick from shelves stocked with products, from cannabis-infused lip balm to potent concentrates that look like thin sheets of amber-colored ice. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 6:54 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Billions of dollars are expected to flow through California's legitimate marijuana industry next year when recreational pot becomes legal, but most of those businesses won't be able to use banks. The reason: Many banks don't want anything to do with pot money for fear it could...
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In this June 27, 2017, photo, an employee weighs sifted pot leaves to make joints at the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary owned by Jerred Kiloh in Los Angeles. On a typical day, $15,000 can change hands in Kiloh's dispensary, where a steady stream of customers pick from shelves stocked with products, from cannabis-infused lip balm to potent concentrates that look like thin sheets of amber-colored ice. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 6:54 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Billions of dollars are expected to flow through California's legitimate marijuana industry next year when recreational pot becomes legal, but most of those businesses won't be able to use banks. The reason: Many banks don't want anything to do with pot money for fear it could...
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In this June 27, 2017, photo, carrying $40,131.88 in cash in his shoulder bag, Jerred Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary, enters the office of finance tax and permit division at Los Angeles City Hall to pay his monthly tax in cash in Los Angeles. For Kiloh, the cash is a daily hassle. It needs to be counted repeatedly to safeguard against loss. State and local taxes must be set aside and stored, sometimes for a month or more. When vendors show up, they get paid in cash, too. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 6:43 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jerred Kiloh's eyes narrowed as he checked his mirror again. The black Chevy SUV with tinted windows was still behind him. It had been hanging off Kiloh's bumper ever since he nosed out of the parking lot behind his medical-marijuana dispensary with $40,131.88 in cash in the...
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In this June 27, 2017, photo, carrying $40,131.88 in cash in his shoulder bag, Jerred Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary, enters the office of finance tax and permit division at Los Angeles City Hall to pay his monthly tax in cash in Los Angeles. For Kiloh, the cash is a daily hassle. It needs to be counted repeatedly to safeguard against loss. State and local taxes must be set aside and stored, sometimes for a month or more. When vendors show up, they get paid in cash, too. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 6:43 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jerred Kiloh's eyes narrowed as he checked his mirror again. The black Chevy SUV with tinted windows was still behind him. It had been hanging off Kiloh's bumper ever since he nosed out of the parking lot behind his medical-marijuana dispensary with $40,131.88 in cash in the...
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This photo provided by AbbVie shows the drug Mavyret. On Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration approved Mavyret to treat all forms of hepatitis C. The drug works in as little as eight weeks and is for patients without significant cirrhosis who haven't been treated previously for the liver-destroying virus, plus patients who were not cured by a prior treatment. (Richard Mack/Courtesy of AbbVie via AP)
August 03, 2017 - 5:52 pm
U.S. regulators have approved the first drug to treat all forms of hepatitis C in as little as eight weeks. The pill combination from AbbVie Inc. was approved Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration for adults without significant cirrhosis, a type of liver disease, and many patients who were...
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This photo provided by AbbVie shows the drug Mavyret. On Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration approved Mavyret to treat all forms of hepatitis C. The drug works in as little as eight weeks and is for patients without significant cirrhosis who haven't been treated previously for the liver-destroying virus, plus patients who were not cured by a prior treatment. (Richard Mack/Courtesy of AbbVie via AP)
August 03, 2017 - 5:52 pm
U.S. regulators have approved the first drug to treat all forms of hepatitis C in as little as eight weeks. The pill combination from AbbVie Inc. was approved Thursday by the Food and Drug Administration for adults without significant cirrhosis, a type of liver disease, and many patients who were...
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In this June 27, 2017, photo, with $40,131.88 in cash hidden in a shoulder bag in his trunk, Jerred Kiloh, owner of the Higher Path medical marijuana dispensary, makes a trip to Los Angeles City Hall to pay his monthly tax in cash in Los Angeles. For Kiloh, it's a stressed-out freeway drive each month from his shop to downtown L.A. The problem: Banks generally don't want the risk of doing business with companies linked to a product that remains illegal to the federal government. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
August 03, 2017 - 4:19 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jerred Kiloh's eyes narrowed as he checked his mirror again. The black Chevy SUV with tinted windows was still behind him. It had been hanging off Kiloh's bumper ever since he nosed out of the parking lot behind his medical-marijuana dispensary with $40,131.88 in cash in the...
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