Health

August 02, 2017 - 7:28 pm
LONDON (AP) — Euthanasia has become "common practice" in the Netherlands, accounting for 4.5 percent of deaths, according to researchers who say requests are increasing from people who aren't terminally ill. In 2002, the Netherlands became the first country in the world that made it legal for...
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August 02, 2017 - 7:28 pm
LONDON (AP) — Euthanasia has become "common practice" in the Netherlands, accounting for 4.5 percent of deaths, according to researchers who say requests are increasing from people who aren't terminally ill. In 2002, the Netherlands became the first country in the world that made it legal for...
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August 02, 2017 - 5:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on health care (all times local): 5:15 p.m. Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona says he cast the crucial vote that sunk his party's health bill last week because his state was — in his words — "about to get screwed." McCain says he wasn't being allowed to offer...
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August 02, 2017 - 5:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on health care (all times local): 5:15 p.m. Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona says he cast the crucial vote that sunk his party's health bill last week because his state was — in his words — "about to get screwed." McCain says he wasn't being allowed to offer...
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FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2016 file photo, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. A bipartisan Senate effort to continue federal payments to insurers and avert a costly rattling of insurance markets faces a dicey future, underscoring that last week’s wreck of the Republican drive to repeal the Obama health care law hasn’t eased the issue’s fraught politics. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 02, 2017 - 5:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan Senate effort to continue federal payments to insurers and avert a costly rattling of health insurance markets faces a dicey future. The uncertainty shows that last week's wreck of the Republican drive to repeal the Affordable Care Act hasn't blunted the issue's sharp...
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FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2016 file photo, Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee Chairman Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn. speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. A bipartisan Senate effort to continue federal payments to insurers and avert a costly rattling of insurance markets faces a dicey future, underscoring that last week’s wreck of the Republican drive to repeal the Obama health care law hasn’t eased the issue’s fraught politics. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 02, 2017 - 5:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan Senate effort to continue federal payments to insurers and avert a costly rattling of health insurance markets faces a dicey future. The uncertainty shows that last week's wreck of the Republican drive to repeal the Affordable Care Act hasn't blunted the issue's sharp...
Read More
Graphic explains the CRISPR-Cas9 method of gene editing; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;
August 02, 2017 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Gene editing is getting fresh attention thanks to a successful lab experiment with human embryos. But for all the angst over possibly altering reproduction years from now, this technology already is used by scientists every day in fields ranging from agriculture to drug...
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Graphic explains the CRISPR-Cas9 method of gene editing; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;
August 02, 2017 - 4:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Gene editing is getting fresh attention thanks to a successful lab experiment with human embryos. But for all the angst over possibly altering reproduction years from now, this technology already is used by scientists every day in fields ranging from agriculture to drug...
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In this July 31, 2017 photo provided by Oregon Health & Science University, Shoukhrat Mitalipov, left, talks with research assistant Hayley Darby in the Mitalipov Lab at OHSU in Portland, Ore. Mitalipov led a research team that, for the first time, used gene editing to repair a disease-causing mutation in human embryos, laboratory experiments that might one day help prevent inherited diseases from being passed to future generations. (Kristyna Wentz-Graff/Oregon Health & Science University via AP)
August 02, 2017 - 4:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Altering human heredity? In a first, researchers safely repaired a disease-causing gene in human embryos, targeting a heart defect best known for killing young athletes — a big step toward one day preventing a list of inherited diseases. In a surprising discovery, a research team...
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In this July 31, 2017 photo provided by Oregon Health & Science University, Shoukhrat Mitalipov, left, talks with research assistant Hayley Darby in the Mitalipov Lab at OHSU in Portland, Ore. Mitalipov led a research team that, for the first time, used gene editing to repair a disease-causing mutation in human embryos, laboratory experiments that might one day help prevent inherited diseases from being passed to future generations. (Kristyna Wentz-Graff/Oregon Health & Science University via AP)
August 02, 2017 - 4:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Altering human heredity? In a first, researchers safely repaired a disease-causing gene in human embryos, targeting a heart defect best known for killing young athletes — a big step toward one day preventing a list of inherited diseases. In a surprising discovery, a research team...
Read More

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