Health

FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2014 file photo former nurse Niels Hoegel accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, stands in the court room wearing handcuffs and covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. Niels Hoegel., accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. German authorities say Monday Aug. 28, 2017 they now believe that a nurse who was convicted of killing patients with overdoses of heart medication killed at least 84 people. Niels Hoegel was convicted in 2015 of two murders and two attempted murders at a clinic in the northwestern town of Delmenhorst. Oldenburg police chief Johann Kuehme said Monday authorities have now unearthed evidence of 84 killings. (Ingo Wagner/dpa via AP)
August 29, 2017 - 11:21 am
BERLIN (AP) — German officials expect to bring new charges against a nurse already serving a life sentence for two murders after determining that he might have killed another 84 patients, if not more, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Oldenburg state prosecutor Martin Koziolek said he expected his office...
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FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2014 file photo former nurse Niels Hoegel accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, stands in the court room wearing handcuffs and covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. Niels Hoegel., accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. German authorities say Monday Aug. 28, 2017 they now believe that a nurse who was convicted of killing patients with overdoses of heart medication killed at least 84 people. Niels Hoegel was convicted in 2015 of two murders and two attempted murders at a clinic in the northwestern town of Delmenhorst. Oldenburg police chief Johann Kuehme said Monday authorities have now unearthed evidence of 84 killings. (Ingo Wagner/dpa via AP)
August 29, 2017 - 11:21 am
BERLIN (AP) — German officials expect to bring new charges against a nurse already serving a life sentence for two murders after determining that he might have killed another 84 patients, if not more, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Oldenburg state prosecutor Martin Koziolek said he expected his office...
Read More
FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2014 file photo former nurse Niels Hoegel accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, stands in the court room wearing handcuffs and covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. Niels Hoegel., accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. German authorities say Monday Aug. 28, 2017 they now believe that a nurse who was convicted of killing patients with overdoses of heart medication killed at least 84 people. Niels Hoegel was convicted in 2015 of two murders and two attempted murders at a clinic in the northwestern town of Delmenhorst. Oldenburg police chief Johann Kuehme said Monday authorities have now unearthed evidence of 84 killings. (Ingo Wagner/dpa via AP)
August 29, 2017 - 11:21 am
BERLIN (AP) — German officials expect to bring new charges against a nurse already serving a life sentence for two murders after determining that he might have killed another 84 patients, if not more, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Oldenburg state prosecutor Martin Koziolek said he expected his office...
Read More
FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2014 file photo former nurse Niels Hoegel accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, stands in the court room wearing handcuffs and covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. Niels Hoegel., accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. German authorities say Monday Aug. 28, 2017 they now believe that a nurse who was convicted of killing patients with overdoses of heart medication killed at least 84 people. Niels Hoegel was convicted in 2015 of two murders and two attempted murders at a clinic in the northwestern town of Delmenhorst. Oldenburg police chief Johann Kuehme said Monday authorities have now unearthed evidence of 84 killings. (Ingo Wagner/dpa via AP)
August 29, 2017 - 8:42 am
BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors say they expect to bring new charges against a male nurse already serving a life sentence for two murders after determining that he might have killed another 84 patients, if not more. Oldenburg state prosecutor Martin Koziolek said Tuesday he expected his office...
Read More
FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2014 file photo former nurse Niels Hoegel accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, stands in the court room wearing handcuffs and covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. Niels Hoegel., accused of multiple murder and attempted murder of patients, covering his face with a file at the district court in Oldenburg, Germany. German authorities say Monday Aug. 28, 2017 they now believe that a nurse who was convicted of killing patients with overdoses of heart medication killed at least 84 people. Niels Hoegel was convicted in 2015 of two murders and two attempted murders at a clinic in the northwestern town of Delmenhorst. Oldenburg police chief Johann Kuehme said Monday authorities have now unearthed evidence of 84 killings. (Ingo Wagner/dpa via AP)
August 29, 2017 - 8:42 am
BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors say they expect to bring new charges against a male nurse already serving a life sentence for two murders after determining that he might have killed another 84 patients, if not more. Oldenburg state prosecutor Martin Koziolek said Tuesday he expected his office...
Read More
In this Aug. 15, 2017, photo, Rita Driscoll works on a treadmill in a supervised exercise therapy program for patients with peripheral artery disease at University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis. Medicare soon will start paying hospitals and clinics for these exercise sessions, making the therapy available for thousands of older Americans with a specific type of leg pain. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
August 29, 2017 - 4:37 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Three times a week, Rita Driscoll steps onto a treadmill at a Minnesota hospital under the eye of a rehab therapist. She walks until it hurts — pushing her limits, walking faster and adding steeper inclines. The retired school aide has leg pain caused by clogged blood vessels. Until...
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In this Aug. 15, 2017, photo, Rita Driscoll works on a treadmill in a supervised exercise therapy program for patients with peripheral artery disease at University of Minnesota Medical Center in Minneapolis. Medicare soon will start paying hospitals and clinics for these exercise sessions, making the therapy available for thousands of older Americans with a specific type of leg pain. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
August 29, 2017 - 4:37 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Three times a week, Rita Driscoll steps onto a treadmill at a Minnesota hospital under the eye of a rehab therapist. She walks until it hurts — pushing her limits, walking faster and adding steeper inclines. The retired school aide has leg pain caused by clogged blood vessels. Until...
Read More
FILE - This Thursday, Dec.18, 2014, file photograph, shows the Merck logo on a stained glass panel at a Merck company building in Kenilworth, N.J. A new type of cholesterol drug meant to prevent heart attacks and other complications clearly did so, in an unusually large study whose results were announced Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, at a conference of heart specialists. But the daily pill only reduced those complications by 9 percent, leaving drugmaker Merck with a tough call on whether to seek regulatory approval after spending 13 years and likely hundreds of millions of dollars on testing. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
August 29, 2017 - 2:35 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — So-so results for a new type of cholesterol drug have left Merck in a quandary: Does the company try to bring it to market or scrap it? A large, long-term study of the drug showed that it prevents heart attacks and reduces the need for heart procedures, while three similar...
Read More
FILE - This Thursday, Dec.18, 2014, file photograph, shows the Merck logo on a stained glass panel at a Merck company building in Kenilworth, N.J. A new type of cholesterol drug meant to prevent heart attacks and other complications clearly did so, in an unusually large study whose results were announced Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, at a conference of heart specialists. But the daily pill only reduced those complications by 9 percent, leaving drugmaker Merck with a tough call on whether to seek regulatory approval after spending 13 years and likely hundreds of millions of dollars on testing. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
August 29, 2017 - 2:35 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — So-so results for a new type of cholesterol drug have left Merck in a quandary: Does the company try to bring it to market or scrap it? A large, long-term study of the drug showed that it prevents heart attacks and reduces the need for heart procedures, while three similar...
Read More
FILE - This Thursday, Dec.18, 2014, file photograph, shows the Merck logo on a stained glass panel at a Merck company building in Kenilworth, N.J. A new type of cholesterol drug meant to prevent heart attacks and other complications clearly did so, in an unusually large study whose results were announced Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017, at a conference of heart specialists. But the daily pill only reduced those complications by 9 percent, leaving drugmaker Merck with a tough call on whether to seek regulatory approval after spending 13 years and likely hundreds of millions of dollars on testing. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
August 29, 2017 - 2:35 am
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — So-so results for a new type of cholesterol drug have left Merck in a quandary: Does the company try to bring it to market or scrap it? A large, long-term study of the drug showed that it prevents heart attacks and reduces the need for heart procedures, while three similar...
Read More

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