Health

FILE - In this June 26, 2020 file photo, a man and his son are silhouetted against the sky as they watch the sunset from a park in Kansas City, Mo. Health experts once thought 2020 might be the worst year yet for a rare paralyzing disease that has been hitting U.S. children for the past decade. But they now say the coronavirus pandemic could disrupt the pattern for the mysterious illnesses, which spike every other year starting in late summer. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
August 04, 2020 - 1:52 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Health experts once thought 2020 might be the worst year yet for a rare paralyzing disease that has been hitting U.S. children for the past decade. But they now say the coronavirus pandemic could disrupt the pattern for the mysterious illnesses, which spike every other year starting...
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FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2016 file photo, bikers ride down Main Street in downtown Sturgis, S.D., before the 76th Sturgis motorcycle rally officially begins. South Dakota, which has seen an uptick in coronavirus infections in recent weeks, is bracing to host hundreds of thousands of bikers for the 80th edition of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. Over a quarter of a million people are expected to rumble through western South Dakota. (Josh Morgan/Rapid City Journal via AP, File)
August 04, 2020 - 12:59 pm
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Sturgis is on. The message has been broadcast across social media as South Dakota, which has seen an uptick in coronavirus infections in recent weeks, braces to host hundreds of thousands of bikers for the 80th edition of the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally. More than 250,000...
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FILE - People wearing face masks pass by newlyweds kissing as they posing for wedding photos at the Olympic Forest Park in Beijing on July 2, 2020. Now that weddings have slowly cranked up under a patchwork of ever-shifting restrictions, horror stories from vendors are rolling in. Many are desperate to work after the coronavirus put an abrupt end to their incomes and feel compelled to put on their masks, grab their cameras and hope for the best. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
August 04, 2020 - 12:32 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Wedding planners, photographers and other bridal vendors who make the magic happen have a heap of new worries in the middle of the pandemic: no-mask weddings, rising guest counts and venues not following the rules. Now that weddings have slowly cranked up under a patchwork of ever-...
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Dr. Tien Vo goes to leave after talking with a family quarantining after they tested positive for the coronavirus Thursday, July 23, 2020, in Calexico, Calif. Vo and members of his clinic bring food to patients that test positive and agree to quarantine. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
August 04, 2020 - 12:08 pm
CALEXICO, Calif. (AP) — Dr. Tien Vo's last stop of the night is the home of a 35-year-old woman who has diabetes, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and, now, the coronavirus. The virus killed her father six days earlier. The oldest of her four children, a 15-year-old boy, learned he had it that morning...
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AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;
August 04, 2020 - 10:59 am
Can you get the coronavirus from secondhand smoke? Secondhand smoke isn’t believed to directly spread the virus, experts say, but infected smokers may blow droplets carrying the virus when they exhale. Being able to smell the smoke might be a red flag that you’re standing too close to the smoker...
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Timea Hunter poses for a photograph at the Family Horse Academy, where she is hoping to organize education for a group of children during the coronavirus pandemic, Friday, July 31, 2020, in Southwest Ranches, Fla. Confronting the likelihood of more distance learning, families across the country are turning to private tutors and "learning pods" to ensure their children receive some in-person instruction. The arrangements raise thorny questions about student safety, quality assurance, and inequality. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
August 04, 2020 - 10:57 am
MIAMI (AP) — On the 4-acre farm at the edge of the Everglades where Timea Hunter runs a horse academy, she has hosted plenty of parties, picnics and workshops. So with her children's school building closed, she figured why not use it also a classroom? While her son and daughter will participate in...
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A man wearing a face mask to protect against the new coronavirus walks by a mural depicting various cultural dance on display on a street in Beijing, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Both mainland China and Hong Kong reported fewer new cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday as strict measures to contain new infections appear to be taking effect. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)
August 04, 2020 - 6:55 am
BEIJING (AP) — China and the World Health Organization are discussing plans to trace the origin of the coronavirus outbreak following a visit to the country by two experts from the U.N. agency, the foreign ministry said Tuesday. Ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin told reporters the experts conducted...
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People walk on the flooded Sea Mountain Highway in North Myrtle Beach, S.C., as Isaias neared the Carolinas on Monday night, Aug. 3, 2020. (Jason Lee/The Sun News via AP)
August 04, 2020 - 4:28 am
NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Isaias has been downgraded down to a tropical storm after making landfall near Ocean Isle Beach, North Carolina, according to an official with the National Hurricane Center. The hurricane had touched down just after 11 p.m. on Monday with maximum sustained...
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Firefighters work against the Apple Fire near Banning, Calif., Sunday, Aug. 2, 2020. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)
August 04, 2020 - 12:43 am
BANNING, Calif. (AP) — A wildfire in mountains east of Los Angeles that has forced thousands of people from their homes was sparked by a malfunctioning diesel vehicle, fire officials said Monday. The vehicle spewed burning carbon from its exhaust system, igniting several fires Friday on Oak Glen...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, March 11, 2020 file photo, a technician prepares COVID-19 coronavirus patient samples for testing at a laboratory in New York's Long Island. The Trump administration’s plan to provide every nursing home with a fast COVID-19 testing machine comes with an asterisk: the government won’t supply enough test kits to check staff and residents beyond an initial couple of rounds. A program that sounded like a game changer when it was announced last month at the White House is now prompting concerns that it could turn into another unfulfilled promise for nursing homes, whose residents and staff account for as many as 4 in 10 coronavirus deaths. Administration officials respond that nursing homes can pay for ongoing testing from a $5-billion federal allocation available to them. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)
August 04, 2020 - 12:15 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's plan to provide every nursing home with a fast COVID-19 testing machine comes with an asterisk: The government won't supply enough test kits to check staff and residents beyond an initial couple of rounds. A program that sounded like a game changer when...
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