Health

Parents of Charlie Gard, Connie Yates and Chris Gard pose for the media ahead of delivering a petition with more than 350,000 signatures to Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, Sunday, July 9, 2017. Britain's justice secretary says the government won't play a role in deciding the medical treatment of a terminally ill baby whose parents want to take him to the U.S. for experimental treatment. David Lidington says that the decision on 11-month-old Charlie Gard will be made by judges acting "independent and dispassionately" based on the facts of the complicated case. (Dominic Lipinski/PA via AP)
July 09, 2017 - 11:13 am
LONDON (AP) — The British parents of a terminally ill baby, facing another court hearing on his condition and care, said Sunday they are hopeful he will receive the experimental treatment that previous rulings have prevented. "If he's still fighting, we're still fighting," said Connie Yates, the...
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In this June 20, 2017 photo, City Court Judge Craig Hannah presides at Opiate Crisis Intervention Court in Buffalo, N.Y. The first such program in the country puts users under faster, stricter supervision than ordinary drug courts, all with the goal of keeping them alive. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)
July 09, 2017 - 10:57 am
BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — After three defendants fatally overdosed in a single week last year, it became clear that Buffalo's ordinary drug treatment court was no match for the heroin and painkiller crisis. Now the city is experimenting with the nation's first opioid crisis intervention court, which can...
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In this June 20, 2017 photo, City Court Judge Craig Hannah presides at Opiate Crisis Intervention Court in Buffalo, N.Y. The first such program in the country puts users under faster, stricter supervision than ordinary drug courts, all with the goal of keeping them alive. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson)
July 09, 2017 - 10:57 am
BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — After three defendants fatally overdosed in a single week last year, it became clear that Buffalo's ordinary drug treatment court was no match for the heroin and painkiller crisis. Now the city is experimenting with the nation's first opioid crisis intervention court, which can...
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July 09, 2017 - 6:51 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is urging federal regulators to look into a "snortable chocolate" powder, saying he's worried that it could prove harmful and is being marketed like a drug. In a letter Saturday, the New York Democrat asked the Food and Drug Administration to investigate...
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July 09, 2017 - 6:51 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer is urging federal regulators to look into a "snortable chocolate" powder, saying he's worried that it could prove harmful and is being marketed like a drug. In a letter Saturday, the New York Democrat asked the Food and Drug Administration to investigate...
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Chuck Schwarz, left, holds hand with his wife Cathy at Heritage Woods of South Elgin, Friday, June 30, 2017, in South Elgin, Ill. Medicaid Americans 65 and order and the disabled make up about a quarter of Medicaid recipients but account for two-thirds of its expenditures. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
July 08, 2017 - 9:30 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Amy Bernard and her brother kept their mother out of a nursing home as long as they could, until Parkinson's and dementia took their toll and she was seriously injured in a fall. Bernard is happy with her mother's nursing home care, but it comes at a steep price: $7,000...
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Chuck Schwarz, left, holds hand with his wife Cathy at Heritage Woods of South Elgin, Friday, June 30, 2017, in South Elgin, Ill. Medicaid Americans 65 and order and the disabled make up about a quarter of Medicaid recipients but account for two-thirds of its expenditures. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
July 08, 2017 - 9:30 am
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Amy Bernard and her brother kept their mother out of a nursing home as long as they could, until Parkinson's and dementia took their toll and she was seriously injured in a fall. Bernard is happy with her mother's nursing home care, but it comes at a steep price: $7,000...
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Butler County sheriff Richard Jones holds a press conference to discuss an officer-involved shooting Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at the Butler County Sheriff's Office. Jones is sticking to his long-standing refusal to allow deputies to carry an overdose-reversal drug. The Butler County Sheriff says he remains opposed for safety reasons because people can become hostile and violent after being revived with Narcan. Deputies in neighboring counties in southwest Ohio do carry it.(Shae Combs /The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP)
July 07, 2017 - 3:05 pm
HAMILTON, Ohio (AP) — A sheriff in an Ohio county with record numbers of drug deaths in recent years is sticking to his longstanding refusal to allow deputies to carry an overdose antidote. Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones remains opposed for safety reasons because, he asserts, people can become...
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Butler County sheriff Richard Jones holds a press conference to discuss an officer-involved shooting Wednesday, June 21, 2017 at the Butler County Sheriff's Office. Jones is sticking to his long-standing refusal to allow deputies to carry an overdose-reversal drug. The Butler County Sheriff says he remains opposed for safety reasons because people can become hostile and violent after being revived with Narcan. Deputies in neighboring counties in southwest Ohio do carry it.(Shae Combs /The Cincinnati Enquirer via AP)
July 07, 2017 - 3:05 pm
HAMILTON, Ohio (AP) — A sheriff in an Ohio county with record numbers of drug deaths in recent years is sticking to his longstanding refusal to allow deputies to carry an overdose antidote. Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones remains opposed for safety reasons because, he asserts, people can become...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014 file photo, Brenda Fitzgerald, Georgia Department of Public Health commissioner, left, and Gov. Nathan Deal respond to questions about Ebola victims at Emory University Hospital and efforts to screen for Ebola among travelers passing through Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport during the governor's visit to Georgia Tech, in Atlanta. On Friday, July 7, 2016, Fitzgerald was named to lead the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the federal government's top public health agency. (AP Photo/David Tulis)
July 07, 2017 - 1:30 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Georgia's health commissioner was named Friday to lead the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the federal government's top public health agency. Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald is an OB-GYN and has been head of the Georgia Department of Public Health since 2011. She succeeds Dr...
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