Science

November 14, 2018 - 7:30 pm
LONDON (AP) — A book about the causes and consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster has won Britain's leading nonfiction literary award. Serhii Plokhy was awarded the 30,000-pound ($39,000) Baillie Gifford Prize at a ceremony in London on Wednesday for "Chernobyl: History of a Tragedy." Plokhy...
Read More
FILE-In this March 10, 2015 file photo, firefighters burned about 30 acres of oak woodland Tuesday, March 10, 2015, during a prescribed burn along the eastern edge of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area in Shasta County, Calif. Creating fire buffers between housing and dry grasslands and brush and burying spark-prone power lines underground would give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, experts say. So would controlled burns, a proven, historic practice that has been neglected in recent decades.(Andreas Fuhrmann/The Record Searchlight via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 5:32 pm
BILLINGS, Montana (AP) — Creating fire buffers between housing and dry brush, burying spark-prone power lines and lighting more controlled burns to keep vegetation in check could give people a better chance of surviving wildfires, according to experts searching for ways to reduce the growing death...
Read More
FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 28, 2017 file photo, floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey overflow from Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston, Texas. A study released on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 says that between being tripped up by downtown and the bigger effect of massive paving and building up of the metro area to reduce drainage, development in Houston on average increased the extreme flooding risk by 21 times. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
November 14, 2018 - 1:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Humans helped make recent devastating U.S. hurricanes wetter but in different ways, two new studies find. Hurricane Harvey snagged on the skyscrapers of Houston, causing it to slow and dump more rain than it normally would, one study found. The city's massive amounts of paving had...
Read More
This illustration provided by Gleiver Prieto and Katerina Harvati shows a group of Neanderthals hunting with non-projectile weapons. A new analysis released on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 says life as a Neanderthal was no picnic, but no more dangerous than what our own species faced in ancient times. (Gleiver Prieto/Katerina Harvati via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 1:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Life as a Neanderthal was no picnic, but a new analysis says it was no more dangerous than what our own species faced in ancient times. The study challenges the common view that our evolutionary cousins lived especially risky lives. It was released Wednesday by the journal Nature...
Read More
Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 11:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
Read More
This 2014 photo provided by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund shows a group of mountain gorillas in Rwanda's Volcanoes National Park. On Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018, the International Union for Conservation of Nature updated the species’ status from “critically endangered” to “endangered.” The designation is more promising, but still precarious. (Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund via AP)
November 14, 2018 - 10:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — There are more gorillas in the mist — a rare conservation success story, scientists say. After facing near-extinction, mountain gorillas are slowly rebounding. On Wednesday, the Switzerland-based International Union for Conservation of Nature updated mountain gorillas' status from...
Read More
A portion of a once-classified CIA report that disclosed the existence of a drug research program dubbed "Project Medication" is photographed in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018. Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug that might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce anxiety, was “possibly worth a try.” But in the end, the CIA decided not to ask government lawyers to approve its use. The American Civil Liberties Union fought in court to have the report released. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick
November 13, 2018 - 11:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Shortly after 9/11, the CIA considered using a drug it thought might work like a truth serum and force terror suspects to give up information about potential attacks. After months of research, the agency decided that a drug called Versed, a sedative often prescribed to reduce...
Read More
This undated photo released by the Kedem Auction House, shows a copy of a 1922 letter Albert Einstein wrote to his beloved younger sister, Maja. The previously unknown letter, brought forward by an anonymous collector, is set to go on auction next week in Jerusalem with an opening asking price of $12,000. In the handwritten letter, Einstein expressed fears of anti-Semitism long before Nazis’ rise. (Kedem Auction House via AP)
November 13, 2018 - 5:28 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — A handwritten letter written by Albert Einstein warning of the dangers of growing nationalism and anti-Semitism years before the Nazis rose to power has been sold for nearly $40,000. The Kedem Auction House says the previously unknown letter, brought forward by an anonymous...
Read More
November 13, 2018 - 11:58 am
MADRID (AP) — Spain's government is eyeing ambitious steps to tackle climate change, including a ban on the sale of gas and diesel cars from 2040. The government presented a blueprint Tuesday that foresees an end to state financial subsidies for fossil fuels and a prohibition on fracking. The...
Read More
This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 photo shows part of an ingredient label, which lists "artificial flavoring," on a packet of candy in New York. In November 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has decided to give companies two years to purge their products of the six ingredients, described only as “artificial flavors” on packages. The words “artificial flavor” or “natural flavor” refer to any of thousands of ingredients. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
November 13, 2018 - 11:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators are giving food companies two years to remove six artificial flavors from their products, even though they say the ingredients are safe in the trace amounts used. The move highlights tension between consumer advocates, who want to know more about what exactly is in...
Read More

Pages