Small business

This undated photo provided by Alliance Defending Freedom shows Breanna Koski, left, and Joanna Duka in Phoenix. An Arizona appeals court on Thursday, June 7, 2018, upheld a Phoenix anti-discrimination law that makes it illegal for businesses like the women's wedding invitation business to refuse service to same-sex couples because of religion. The court said if Duka and Koski, owners of Brush & Nib Studio, "want to operate their for-profit business as a public accommodation, they cannot discriminate against potential patrons based on sexual orientation." (Alliance Defending Freedom via AP)
June 07, 2018 - 5:33 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — An Arizona appeals court on Thursday upheld a Phoenix anti-discrimination law that makes it illegal for businesses to refuse service to same-sex couples because of religion. The ruling comes days after the U.S. Supreme Court sided with a Colorado baker who refused to make a wedding...
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Uber driver Joshua Oh drives in Honolulu on Wednesday, June 6, 2018. Honolulu's city council is scheduled to vote on a bill that won't allow ride-hailing services to impose so-called "surge pricing" on riders if the fee is higher than a maximum amount set by the city. The bill says the city would set a maximum fare private transportation companies may charge. That would prevent surge prices that are higher than the city-set limit. (AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher)
June 06, 2018 - 11:28 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Honolulu leaders approved a measure Wednesday to limit prices that ride-hailing services like Uber and Lyft can charge during peak demand, a cap that the companies say would be the first restriction of its kind in the United States. The measure would prevent "surge pricing" if...
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In this photo taken May 22, 2018, members of the Culinary Workers Union, Local 226, assemble for a presentation in a university arena before an evening vote on whether to authorize a strike in Las Vegas. The union representing Las Vegas casino-hotel workers has reached tentative agreements for new contracts with two companies that employ more than two-thirds of the 50,000 workers threatening to strike and is now focusing on negotiations with smaller casino operators. The Culinary Union on Monday, June 4, 2018, said it is turning its attention to 15 properties that still need contracts, including Tropicana, Treasure Island, Golden Nugget and SLS. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)
June 04, 2018 - 7:00 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — A union for Las Vegas casino-hotel workers is shifting its attention to negotiating contracts with smaller casino operators after reaching tentative labor agreements with two companies that employ most of the 50,000 employees threatening the first citywide strike in more than three...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2018, file photo, members of the Culinary Workers Union, Local 226, assemble for a presentation at a university arena before an evening vote on whether to authorize a strike in Las Vegas. The two largest resort operators in Las Vegas would lose more than $10 million a day combined if housekeepers, cooks and others go on strike, a possibility starting Friday, the union representing thousands of casino workers said, Thursday, May 31, 2018. (Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP, File)
May 31, 2018 - 8:25 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — The possibility of 50,000 Las Vegas casino workers going on strike drew closer Thursday, with their contracts expiring at midnight and the prospects of new ones still uncertain. The bartenders, housekeepers, bellmen and other unionized workers at 34 casino-hotels on the Strip and...
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FILE - In this Sept. 30, 2016, file photo, a marijuana harvester examines buds going through a trimming machine near Corvallis, Ore. Three years after Oregon lawmakers created the state's new legal marijuana program, marijuana prices in the state are in free fall and the craft cannabis farmers who put Oregon on the map decades before legalization are losing their businesses to emerging chains and out-of-state investors. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky, File)
May 31, 2018 - 3:17 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — When Oregon lawmakers created the state's legal marijuana program, they had one goal in mind above all else: to convince illicit pot growers to leave the black market. That meant low barriers for entering the industry that also targeted long-standing medical marijuana growers...
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McGregor Scott, right, the United States Attorney for the Eastern District of California, accompanied by California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, discusses an increase in the use of a banned pesticide at illegal marijuana farms hidden on public lands Tuesday, May 29, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. Researchers found the highly toxic pesticide Carbofuran, which can't legally be used in the Unites States, at 72 percent of grow sites last year, up 15 percent from 2012. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 29, 2018 - 6:57 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — An alarming increase in the use of a highly toxic and banned pesticide at illegal marijuana farms hidden on public land in California is leading U.S. and state officials to team up on an issue that recently divided them: pot. They announced Tuesday that they will use $2.5...
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FILE – In this April 15, 2018, file photo, demonstrators protest outside the Starbucks cafe in Philadelphia where two black men were arrested three days earlier for waiting inside without ordering anything. On Tuesday, May 29, 2018, the company plans to close more than 8,000 stores nationwide to conduct anti-bias training, a move intended to show how serious the company is about living up to its now tarnished image as a neighborhood hangout where all are welcome. (AP Photo/Ron Todt, File)
May 28, 2018 - 5:25 pm
Starbucks, trying to put to rest an outcry over the arrest of two black men at one of its stores, is closing more than 8,000 stores for an afternoon of anti-bias training, a strategy some believe can keep racism at bay. After the arrests in Philadelphia last month, the coffee chain's leaders...
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In this May 17, 2018 photo, Miriam Zouzounis looks through a selection of tobacco products while interviewed at Ted's Market, her family's store, in San Francisco. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. is pumping millions of dollars into a campaign to persuade San Francisco voters to reject a ban on selling flavored tobacco products, including menthol cigarettes and vaping liquids with flavors like cotton candy, mango and cool cucumber. Zouzounis, a board member of the Arab American Grocers Association, which represents 400 small-business owners in the San Francisco Bay Area, said the ban would remove an anchor product that attracts customers, many of which are immigrant-owned. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
May 28, 2018 - 2:57 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A major tobacco company is pumping millions of dollars into a campaign to persuade San Francisco voters to reject a ban on selling flavored tobacco products, including menthol cigarettes, certain chewing tobaccos and vaping liquids with flavors like cotton candy, mango and cool...
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This May 29, 2016 photo provided by Christian Kahahawai shows Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama planting huli, or taro seedlings at her farm in Hanalei, Kauai island, Hawaii. Farmers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai say their state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop, a staple of the traditional Hawaiian diet, after record-breaking rains flooded their fields in April 2018. Haraguchi-Nakayama said damage from the flooding was the worst her family has seen, including her 96-year-old grandfather. It did more harm to their 55-acre farm than Hurricane Iniki that slammed Kauai in 1992. (Christian Kahahawai/Kahahawai Photography via AP)
May 28, 2018 - 12:10 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Farmers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai say their state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop, a staple of the traditional Hawaiian diet, after record-breaking rains flooded their fields. The deluge hit the north shore community of Hanalei particularly hard. The region grows...
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FILE - This Nov. 21, 2016 file photo shows Emigrant Peak towering over the Paradise Valley in Montana north of Yellowstone National Park. A gold exploration proposal in the area has suffered a significant setback after a judge ruled Montana officials understated mining's potential harm to land, water and wildlife. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
May 25, 2018 - 7:13 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A gold exploration proposal near Yellowstone National Park faced a significant setback as a judge blamed Montana officials for understating the potential for mining to harm land, water and wildlife. The ruling released Friday means the Montana Department of Environmental...
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