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Police Terrorism: 1865 and 2017

Carolina Focus
Friday, October 27th
Dr. Katherine J. Anderson, guest lecturer at Queens University, talks about her research into police using terrorism as a way to influence societal behavior. Amie Newsome discusses the Green Celebration at the Charlotte Regional Farmers Market and the plethora of ways to prepare cruciferous vegetables...that's cabbage, cauliflower, kale, etc. Tom Okel heads up the Carolina Thread Trail; 1,590 miles of hiking, biking, kayaking and more. Mark Garrison explores the new, effective, treatment of strokes with our own Jerry Dowd.
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Transcript - Not for consumer use. Robot overlords only. Will not be accurate.

I'm mark Thomas and this is Carolina focus on news 11109893. WBP. 1079 going. 102 point 56 and the fan it's where we look at issues events and happenings that affect the Carolinas and the Charlotte region. Welcome. So glad you could join us here again this morning talk on the program. Charlotte has been. And the scene of a number of. We shootings and and in recent years and actually. Police community relations is something that we discussed on a fairly regular basis here. And coming up in just a couple of days and Queen's University there's going to be a lecture given by doctor Katherine Anderson. From the University of California at Davis she's coming to town and she's going to be talking about. A a subject which kind of relates to us as well here in Charlotte. Of monsters and militarized men police terrorism in 1865. And 2017. And joining us now is doctor Katherine Anderson good morning doctor Anderson. It's say it's good to have you here now this is something that you're your specialty is like English history English literature. So your focus really is more on British policing is it not. Yes and actually more on them torture at the forum on state chair Tom in British history. And now is something. You see in British history British history goes back and would we wanna go back to. Assignment the signing of the Magna Carta. Or or even be a model for our current. Okay. For my part I've spoken on the nineteenth century plan. When Britain was running umpire potentially. Outside and. So it's more it's more of a modern version as opposed to let's say enough in 12100 or something like that. Henry gates were not necessarily too concerned about. Although I'm from what I understand he wasn't really nice guy and especially in the marriage. But if that's already read and without it processed at the subject. Thinking about it as a form. My ball rather where were getting modern form of torture and a chair and kind of come and through the ways that the the partners on military and government interact in the collar means end arms and reaction really cute. Different subjects like called on the people are quite fortunate and packaging pretty quiet and more. Their citizenship or. Terrible the way they should be on and so. Torture become the kind of former chairs and and she'll bring him back into line. Now how do you how are you defying terror torture in this particular case because I think it you know it all depends on. The Who and whom you know who's doing the torturing and who is being tortured sometimes. As to. Various perceptions. I guess the pursuit comes to my mind is the concept of waterboarding. Which during World War II there are a number of Japanese officers who were executed for during that two American prisoners yet. When the same was done by Americans in the Middle East. After the invasion of Iraq. It wasn't viewed quite is as much as a torture method. Right to appropriate for a cap interrogate them right he to euphemistically put it that way yes. All right how Howard how are you defining how are you defining what to would you classify as torture. All aren't buying it as. A former. Coordinate. The net to make people do something great shell attack he did something that it states changed and whether tacitly or. And explicitly and have it be. Done at the way not just the person who's being subjected to this form a triple core extreme or the court sent. But other people who are not about race that I have chair and come in our ears back. Prompting the cabin like house hearing about it happening to someone else in the form of controlling it not just the person who's being attracted to. I'm back where I antigens project. I am a nineteenth century but they're our. A British empire out and rent and current. I was sitting down with the president together it was just after. What it happened at Abu Ghraib and can now currently dealing with a stop the launching her I call on Larry. I really think about our question on how do we define torture and why term and nineteen century British empire that also. The government that. Said the pop up within minutes it won't now our government that is. Against torture that there can spread liberty and justice. Well right and the world as we go out tomorrow. Currently without it and the fact that has really talked about the current war. They coordinate on that happening in that way as a form of torture perpetrated actually shell current policy could not. And there are not a crackpot got started. Projects. Now you have a starting point right of 1865. At least this is part of the title of the election you're going to be giving. But I'm I guess I'm an inferred that or assume. That this sort of tactic was utilized prior to that in the eighteen hundreds. And physical back prior to that because in looking at some of the things. In kind of getting ready Doolittle. Preparation for our discussion here this morning. The British home secretary Robert peel who started. The actual British police forcing in in the 1820s. Did it prove to kind of come along with that because his in his background was controlling. But were now. Terrorists if you will in Ireland. Prior to being home secretary so is this something mechanic came along as part of the military and militarized men. That started the British police. System as we know today. I would say yes actually I'm in this moment and get excited and looking at current age. It's a moment later. It's specifically about the emerging from the military and the police port under partial optional in 65 in October. A group of black Jamaican. Proud of their racial protests that burned out or call. So quite the count and the governor. To court martial art and may occur out of I'm a bunch of British troops continental army and needy and they hurt together with the police force and let. I'm the volunteer militia that there are as well and technically. Torture and execute hundreds of people come without trial because it's under martial law. Condit with people that make them on the gauntlet. Days they hang around and make everybody watching right on the prisoners eat and watch paying them on apparent at that and it doesn't. Whether it's a number that small group approach that you are not going to run riot doing. Whenever they want what they want on the island for about a month. And it cost a great deal of and back in Britain looking out of the pack and her. Archer has been something at the British military and looked at circuit feed. Moral force in the world you know spreading in life and work. Was responsible for that. I'm looking at developing out of what I call the military have a which typically also in our capital and what I've learned how to set the world can't hear what is the theological content. Is the idea that. When you grow up when your sort of trains in uncertain social position. You will embody. A cabinet that aren't gonna everybody not social and why he usually talks about class. I'm not thinking about it typically emulation you know that your that there. And the need it isn't that you are in a petition in the year. Com president and constant combat military influence to bring people haven. Until they're trying con. Though completed it and while treated in the military. The sort of constant locking her career with the caps on the south. And energized and confident out. Previous colonial rebellion however expect it to crack. We can in effect then there without secret report. A lot of sort of make our had been there as well. Squirm and that is something like what people out here in July which make a couple of to heal the church horrible thing. And our current majority of the British public what it earned because you're back in the kind of I'm a little one in each group has power but begin to sense. To become expectations for a man to carry them out more self control and you consider others aren't accurate and make an assessment accurate. Really want earned by these sort of the spectacle atrocity. You know it can not guard and Iraq are actually going to be. I'm confronted what they're doing England and it's quick it's. And we're term with the well being. But our regarding doctor Kathryn Anderson who's going to be giving a lecture at Queen's University on the thirtieth. Which is a Monday evening. Called of monsters and militarized men police terrorism and 1865. And 2017. And you talk about the uprising in India and missing people who put down that uprising going to Jamaica. And employing basically there at the same sort of tactics to put down this rebellion if you will match and would you necessarily call it a rebellion. That occurred in Jamaica. Color so I. Called everything and aren't you mean because it was something that threatens the security of their club so. I think out and call it. Either that they are brightening our now green so contacts. People protesting the jamaicans in the objects and now actually. The subject of Victoria in its attraction shot. I'm from Britain on the very common so they are expecting. You know expecting to get out camp advocate. Cannot control. The cleaners and talk. Car. I'm. So surprised. So it was so they really it did. Kind of like I guess the law of unintended consequences in this particular case writ large. That they didn't see this coming. But. The mentality you you talk about you know being militarized. You know a robust masculinity. Ethos. That in views. The police military mentality. And you take fist when he seventeen. This year. His. Has it evolved has it changed are we looking at kind of the same mentality is we saw among the British in Jamaica. You know a 160 years ago. Near or what are we looking I think so I think what you want to think for me that it it is the mentality in our. Customers. In its day I think. Talk about a time when people talk about the military base and the police work for contemporary mom and they're thinking about that emerged. Source sketched you know military year span. Supply and that are. They're starting around these huge tanks and you know where on the write your column back I'm really lit into our is that it is actually. That content they are greatly in Jamaica and the military man partner Marc we work. They relate you know we're in martial law. Everything is an apartment it's my act together to reassert control. To do record. What are we have to be opening half and it's okay I'm working I think our actually cropping up here in the states and part of the new right. The orange in the war on terror which are. You know sort of mythological. Or ideological construction and don't have a clear and on an opt in college shouldn't. Stay in the petition and to be stopped and so on because the police are plotting to dealing with those things come on our oral remarks that. The current programs. And training and service. I'm. Yeah tactical maneuvers are from from military numbers and a lot of veterans or aren't we scored on an intern. I'm getting out and kind of attitude and mentality. That anything goes quiet back. We must do what we have to do to contain thing on to contain a threat to me early on to become a Eric on the Internet an example out or else. Well you mentioned the the war on drugs. And the war on terror but you know we've also had a war on crime we've got a war on poverty. That seems to know that the cons in the concept of war. We seem to be very casual. In the application of the word. Because it in a war. Should be something that one would assume historically is done between governments. Over territory or ideology or something like that as opposed to being a domestic policy. Concept. Yes absolutely I think I think what you're no worse than breaking out. Just weren't here next year you can control to not environments that the Yankees are back on April 4 as he lay next. And it has to work or let's say that you are now he got worse at age advocate ever want you know to insult the sap. They're kind of that you are fine actors. And senate okay the only person that's happening to our that our country. You know. If it's added that the patient advocate everybody's performance out of the day for again put an opening and I'm. But it becomes okay and it's a slippery slope we thought I went after. The budget situation and are relied very heavily in the kind of rhetoric. Do a lot of I won't go internationally parents about the when he comes back increased the power. Let's say it's her governor. And talk inevitably turn one saint. Yet and they were talking with doctor Kathryn Andersen. From university California at Davis she's going to be giving a lecture. Monday night tomorrow night on. Team of monsters and militarized men police terrorism and 18652017. Asking me Queen's University. And it is free and open to the public by the way. But you know you talk about. The military mindset. The swat teams that we CR which are so common these days in in virtually every local police department has a swat team. The original name for those by Daryl Gates who started this in Los Angeles with special weapons attack team. And they decided from a public relations standpoint that didn't sound real good so they changed it to come through special weapons and tactics team. But in a bit the whole idea of when and where gates got this was from the actions taken by the CIA in particular in Vietnam. In organizing local police forces there to put down any sort of domestic insurrection in Vietnam. In the people who set that up for the people that worked well Daryl Gates to establish these swat teams. So from a an ideological. Tap root. And that's where comes from. So is it would or should we really be surprised. That. That the a militarized mentality is part of what we see in. You know some little town that has the swat team. I mean yet yes and now I think it. Become a lot of equipment has been. A lot of the what I think. Standing at that America has had historical hostility toward the military and the port. And that would mean more production away. I'm an hour after the Cold War because you know what the idea that someone inside the country could be doing something on crappy sex and then perhaps you know it's 82. Are dropped out staying. But in the getting. In the beginning at things. Really they didn't want to have that it will happen and be part what they want cheap. Didn't protect her and what happened at a military power. That that kind of Iger and instantly Serbs particularly not model equipment and. Well and you mentioned that the separation of powers between the police and the military. Most people familiar with the beaten with a phrase posse coma policy act. And here in the south that really has. More meaning that possibly other places because it was. It was that act that was passed in the late eighteen hundreds but said no we're not gonna use the military as a police force. In the reconstructed confederacy that's gonna end and so that's where you know and that's where that came from. And you're right that was something of kind of a gold standard you know of a line that you didn't cross. Until. Perhaps in the last twenty years or so. Yeah. Yeah. And I think what's interesting. It isn't for me as well as that. But it really shows that it did in in and you know I think in the empire of the church on how to stay. Are the kind of inflation. Capital of memory is right to in the south as you say how rhetorical calling out of is patrol. And a kind of vigilant confirmed he could eat pray and former players after the civil war. I'm under control in the election. And then in the north and the city like Boston and New York I think are developing their cliques are certainly become kind of wait for economic control act you know. We need production and happening at low wage workers to do their job not kidnapped and not I had. On the source he comes despite being on the street right and that idea was practical or something stops people doing something on the that he wanted to do. I'm can have got to act now aren't control. Well and you you mention new York and you mentioned you know the economic aspect of it. You know we saw in the last few years a man was selling Lucy's you know single cigarettes on the sidewalk. Was basically executed on the street. For doing that by the new York city police department. Who were so it is that something that I mean Ryan and people may not look at that is necessarily an economic control thing. But when you really come down to it that's what was there was you know a prohibition on selling acts in the given circumstances. It was legal and other circumstances. Yeah something that even if it wasn't you know under wraps her. I would probably be either boxing you would expect. And so again there are the current example everybody else I like beacons into the XQ someone argued saying on the street. Any and the one Q and actually it's been listening on a number of protesters or are. Were protesting equivalent. I there was a brief moment on the on the news that an open air their brief moment where we officer whoever protesters in their industry. Yeah that street are street. I'm certain tender right here at the against them mentality are being used against. You know the United States and citizens. On and the kind of triumphant spectacle police power on the very much and that's Election Day. And we're talking with doctor Kathryn Andersen. Who's going to be giving a lecture tomorrow evening at Queen's University on a monsters and militarized men police terrorism and 1865. And 2017. How well let me ask you another question in. How do we how do we change this mentality. Should it be changed. One question that I saw posed in hidden in this whole concept of policing was should any group of people claim all licensed to commit aggressive violence. In the name of imposing order. Based on that fundamental question where do we go from here can we change it should it be changed are we on the right path. Do we need more of it or less. I mean I think. This is one of the things that I'm working on you know other write that book and I've been thinking about a lot. I think at the level individual police department. I'm moving back to pretending that back to a kind of model of community policing who writes these delays to go right. Might suggest brown back. The police. Departments and courts to be you know primarily in the people who are police saying neighborhood that color for example usually. Don't necessarily there are a bit like here about her arm on the threatening. Having officers spend more time than the Yankees and trying to. Retraining or re or non active duty of protecting and serving rather than. You know trying to achieve the external enemy. Might see one go on at the level. Institutional policy. You know I've been thinking a lot about liberalism hasn't been a lot about it democracy you can kind of where it enriched. Very way we think about. Our nation and my have to change to remind her to acknowledge their thing. On a network or socialist or other all of them are older and you know upper level articulate policies and south. My are there and execute the plan I'm sorry about it. I'm so that serve on the ground kind of deal and a higher level to do with their does it. And what but I also wanna ask your question about. Winston Churchill. A name your probably familiar with. This since you study British history. He was supposedly said if you make 101000 regulations you destroy all respect for the law. What if that's true. What is it surprising in your mind when their peoples there was no respect for law enforcement. But doesn't that seem to kind of go hand in hand if you destroy respect for the law. That those that enforce the law are not and I rather. While protecting I think burnout from it I think that respect for people here except for. Being. The facility. Ray that we we see as a result of the policy is there that ultimately it etched. We've seen instances of police terror on police brutality. Consistently over however. Hi actually my principal. I activated. At all. Paper and we tell our economic you know. It was happening and people talking about the so called me about the bigger and so I think. And I have to use some. Too. Re the police force and our communities again and make them part of the rather than. You know something or some sort of getting on the other side of or not it's fine. Do you think that we could return to a more constabulary. Type of model. And it can take what's mr. peel started in an eighteen in the 1820s in London. As our as our basis and a return to more of a constabulary. Which really kind of operates more like a fire department. That is unless the police are called for a specific thing. You know if there is no victim there is no crime kind of mentality that you have to demonstrate you know there is a victim. You know put a fire departments don't go don't go running around it in breaking the people's house is looking for a voter overloaded circuits. Or. So could it. Do you think we might be able to get to that point ever. Where edits and viewed I was then it would be more because everybody loves the fire. I mean let's face it they're there to help you're up it says exactly how to treat sick not on a regular basis get the bucket truck boys we got another cabinetry. So but in there's a whole different mind set when it comes to police and law enforcement. Can we might that be a better model to go to. As opposed to what we have now where you know police officers seemed to think their job is to enforce all the laws. And we got a lot of eyes you wouldn't that be wonderful we cut the practicality of that sort of a car near OJ. A radical reorientation. The equipment and typically sorts itself and the greens. Trained its number of her arms but I do think. If we can get there to get that idea. I'm here for my community and helping my community that's my role. It would change to what these individual interactions and the moment that situation I. Black market it's here now. I'm agreement that in terms of the exact number here apparently in the UK and 19100. Opera like that in 2015. They had 52 people who were killed. By police. In that entire. And eighteen years it was 62 people. Just. The plate and a leading under the comparing that Q how many bats for that then we'll. Tell mark of 22 in the United States with something like. A hundred Q and settle. You know those statistics right there Eaton to the difference. You know kind of picking your comment that he can people have died. Because they're the police force and the UK on the security. What does that speak more about the populace where the police would you say. Act with a question I think that either way there's there's. Lack of cities and military attitude of the military happy that at least be re arm. And the group for Canadian population as well. Here in the United States and right now entering you know the trump administration's spying. We'll we're seeing a lot of talks that militarized not an idea where we export program and stop the constantly. You hate and vitriol and burn people are for the violence so. Here. We need it and it turns out. Well and and of course you know I I would I guess I would say kinda continues under the truck administration. For all his fault he didn't you know he did. He didn't start the swat teams and in Los Angeles in 68 that's true and I mean we've had it's it's kind of like an equal opportunity. Sort of situation that word that we're looking at here in Ferguson occurred under the Obama administration. For a good. So. Gathered at a certain kind of bleeding you know of that archery Rochester right here from. Serb police for a look into the count population my action you know in the executive returns and or not he would sort of coming out everywhere else. And doctor Katherine Anderson we appreciate you being here in Carolina focus you're gonna be Queen's University tomorrow evening. And giving a talk on this very subject and I believe that starts at 1:8 o'clock. I don't for eight to ten and that's at Queen's University. Kept their auditorium at 8 o'clock in the Sykes building at Queen's University. And doctor Kathryn Andersen we appreciate you being here on Carolina focus and we hope you enjoy your stay in Charlotte. It's not California I can tell you that although some people wanna an important whether I. What we're trying to be California and a half a it's a couple great I appreciate you being here adds hope you have a blessed day and I think travels through YouTube from them. Thank you for having. I'm your host mark Thomas and thanks for listening to Carolina focus on these 1110993. WBT. 107911. Point 56 and the fan. Also available to podcast at WPP dot com. I'm mark Thomas. And this is Carolina focus on news 11109893. WDT. 1079 going. One or 2.5 six and the fan it's where we look at issues events and happenings that affect the Carolinas and the Charlotte region. Welcome. So glad you could join us here again this morning hop on the program. Charlotte has been. The scene of a number of police shootings and yeah in in recent years and actually. Police community relations is something that we discussed on a fairly regular basis here. And coming up in just a couple of days it queens university there's going to be a lecture given by doctor Katherine Anderson. From the University of California at Davis she's coming to town and she's going to be talking about. A a subject which kind of relates to us as well here in Charlotte. Of monsters and militarized men police terrorism in 1865. And 2017. And joining us now is doctor Katherine Anderson good morning doctor Anderson. It's say it's good to have you here now this is something that you're your specialty is like English history English literature. So your focus really is more on British policing is it not. Yes and actually more on them torture at the forum on. State chair Tom in British history. And now this is something. You see in British history British history goes back I don't know do we wanna go back to. Assignment the signing of the Magna Carta or or even be a model for our current. Okay. For my part I've spoken on the nineteenth century when. Talks. When Britain was running on air potentially. Upside down. So it's more it's more of a modern version as opposed to let's say enough in 12100 or something like that. Henry gates were not necessarily too concerned about. Although I'm from what I understand he wasn't really nice guy and especially in the marriage but the that's already read and without it. That's that's that's a subject that. Thinking about it as a form. Marvel rather airport getting on and on torture and a cheer them kind of coming. Through the week that the the partners on military and government interact in the collar means and Iran and reaction really cute. Different subjects like called on the people are quite and our packaging for crying out of short term. Their citizenship or. Terrible the way that they should be. On and so. Torture become the kind of former chair at them and she will bring back into line. Now how do you how are you defying terror torture in this particular case because I think it you know it all depends on. The Who in the whom you know who's doing the torturing and who is being tortured sometimes. As to. Various perceptions. I guess the pursuit comes to my mind is the concept the waterboarding. Which during World War II there are a number of a Japanese officers who were executed for during that two American prisoners yet. When the same was done by Americans in the Middle East. After the invasion of Iraq. It wasn't viewed quite is as much as a torture method. Right to appropriate for an account interrogate Federer he to euphemistically put it that way yes. All right how Howard how are you defining how are you defining what to which he classified as torture. All of defining it as. A form. And coordinate. That's actually make people do something great shell attack he is something that age they changed and whether tacitly or. And explicitly and it has EB. Not at the way not the person who's being subjected to this form a triple core extreme of the court and but other people find out about their right to that idea of terrorism can be done our ears back. Something that happened in my house hearing about it happening to someone else in the form of controlling it not just the person eighteen tactic to. I'm that's been very engagement project. I am in nineteen century but they're scholar. The British empire on Brandt Aaron I'm. But I think now the department together it was just after. What it happened at Abu Ghraib I can now aren't currently dealing with a stuffed in the launching her eye on where. I really think about. Questioned on how we define torture and why term and like centuries but apparently also. The government that. Try to pop up within minutes it was now government that is. Against torture that is there can spread liberty and justice. The great thing in the world and we the world tomorrow. Currently without it by the fact that that was talked about the Korean War. They coordinate on that happening is that as a form of torture perpetrated by the shell on the ballot in Qatar. What are the terrible not a crackpot got started. Projects. Now you have a starting point right of 1865. At least this is part of the title of the election you're going to be giving. But I'm I guess I'm gonna infer that or assume. That this sort of tactic was utilized prior to that in the eighteen hundreds. And physical back prior to that because in looking at some of the things. In kind of getting ready do little preparation for our discussion here this morning. The British home secretary Robert peel who started. The actual British police forcing in in the 1820s. Did it moved to kind of come along with that because his in his background was controlling. The root out terrorists if you will in Ireland. Prior to being home secretary so is this something mechanic came along as part of the military and militarized men. That started the British police. System as we know it today. I would say yes actually lose this moment and get excited and looking at her age. At the moment we're. It's specifically about the merchant of the military and the police force under partial optional in Dixie cart in October. A group of market making and such a stir the racial protests different outlets or call earned the right people killed and the governor had a court martial art and to make a trip out of I'm a bunch of our troops continental army and needy on and they hurt together with the police force and lists. I'm the volunteer militia that there are as well and technically. Torture and execute hundreds of people come without trial because that's under martial law. Come they let people that make them on the complex. Say they hang around and make everybody watch hanging them right Michael Gardner each and watched hang them on airing at bat and it definitely aren't whether it's a number that all of the chargers are not equipped to run riot doing. Whenever they want whoever they want on the island for about a month. And it cost a great deal of and back in Britain when you know but the path and her. Or church I think something at the British military and the circuit each. Moral force in the world you know spreading and why antiwar com was responsible for that and now. I'm looking at the topic of what I call a military have a which typically also embodied personal and what happened and how to set it for content here what is the theological cop. Is the idea that. When you grow up vineyard sort of training in certain social position. You will embody our cabinet our record and not social and why he talks about class. I think about it is that we emulation technology as a group com. And that it and need it isn't too didn't you are in the petition and they share. Com president and constant combat military influence to bring people behave and Ervin so they're drawing on. Though we it and I'll get treated in the military. The sort of constant blocking on the current cap on the well on America on the passionate. Previous colonial rebellion however expect it to cracks I'm. Clinton is meeting to set and there without Hitler and she. A lot of the sort of make our tech in the air well squirm and that is that something like what people have camera in July and I'm. Make the cut was content ilk really are horrible thing. Our current majority of the British public order and earned because you're in past it and kind of our harper goes on the when he group empower that begins to sense the become. Expectations for a man can talk more self control on York and others are particular Jamaica and then. A couple of early on. I sort of the spectacle atrocity. You know it can corrupt guards don't realize that they're actually going to be. I'm confronted what they're doing. It and taking cricket for. And we're term with the well being. But our Ricardo cracker Kathryn Anderson who's going to be giving a lecture at Queen's University on the thirtieth. Which is a Monday evening. Called of monsters and militarized men police terrorism and 1865. And 2017. And you talk about the uprising in India and the same people who put down that uprising going to Jamaica. And employing basically the the same sort of tactics to put down this rebellion if you will and I and would you necessarily call it rebellion. That occurred in Jamaica. Color so straight. Called everything and aren't you need because it was something that threaten the security of their own self. Cutting out there and call it. That they uprising or now correct so our contacts. People protesting the jamaicans in the subjects and out actually on the subject of Victoria who are entitled to the traction on. Some written on the military. I'm so they are not expecting you know but looking at a camp at this comment cannot control of the green and talk about a I'm. So surprised. So it is so they really into it. Kind of like I guess the law of unintended consequences in this particular case writ large. That they didn't see this coming. But. The mentality you you talk about you know being militarized. You know a robust masculinity. Ethos. That in views. The police military mentality. And you take fist when he seventeen. This year. His. Has it evolved has it changed a revoking it kind of the same mentality is we saw among the British in Jamaica. You know a 160 years ago. You know or what are we looking I think so I think what you want to think for me it that it is the mentality. Or the customers particularly in the United States I think. A lot of times people talk about the military base and the police force where contemporary moment. They're thinking about it wedged. We weren't sketched you know military year span. Why and they're starting around these huge tanks and you know where all the right here in our backs are really cool within our attitude. Constant state mark greatly in Jamaica and the military man partner mark we were. They were like you know grand Marshal law. Everything is falling apart it's right back together after reassert control. That you're from. Whenever we didn't have to and it's okay I'm working at one of our actually cropping up here in London stage in part because there's no rights. The war and the war on terror. Which are. You know sort of mythological. Or ideological construction and don't have a clear and important and often clutch shouldn't be. Stay in the petition at each stop I fell on. Because the police are gone in dealing with those staying current car formal remarks that. The current problem ticketing. Trains are. Tactical maneuvers are from from military members and a lot of veteran territory and the prince scored on the turn. I'm getting and kinda trying to mentality. Anything goes. Right back. You'll have to do to contain thing on the container back in the states in come and Eric on the Internet an example out of. Well you mentioned the the war on drugs. And the war on terror but you know we've also had a war on crime we've got a war on poverty. That it seems that you know the the cons in the concept of war. We seem to be very casual. In the application of the word. Because it in a war. Should be something that one would assume historically is done between governments. Over territory or ideology or something like that as opposed to being a domestic policy. Concept. Yes absolutely I think and I think what you're seeing here or doesn't break out. Just weren't Syria next year you can control to not environments that the Yankees are back on April or as he lay next. And it has to work or let's say that you are now. These are worse at age advocate every line you know rocket and out of the corner that you are fine actors. Current that in an OK and nearly enough to stop the capital to our senate and our country aren't you know. Inconsistent that the patient advocate everybody performance while you are trying to stay put for a it and put it in which. But it becomes okay and that is the slippery slope we thought I went after. The budget situation and I'm like they're currently in the kind of rhetoric. Do a lot of I think they'll internationally parents about the when he comes back increased the power of the states and our governor. And cognitively her one bit. Yeah I am and we're talking with doctor Kathryn Andersen. From the university California at Davis she's going to be giving a lecture. Monday night tomorrow night on. Beam of monsters and militarized men police terrorism and 1865 and 2017 ask me Queen's University. And it is free and open to the public by the way. But you know you talk about. The military mindset. The swat teams that we CR which are so common these days in in virtually every local police department has a swat team. The original name for those by Daryl Gates who started this in Los Angeles with special weapons attack team. And they excited for a public relations standpoint that didn't sound real good so they changed it to come through special weapons and tactics team. But you know that the whole idea of well and where gates got this was from the actions taken by the CIA in particular in Vietnam. In organizing local police forces there to put down any sort of domestic insurrection in Vietnam. In the people who set that up for the people that work with Daryl Gates to establish these swat teams. So from a an ideological. Tap root. And that's where comes from. So is or would or should we really be surprised. That. The the a militarized mentality is part of what we see in. You know some little town that has the swat team. A media attention now. The current lot rock. And a lot but I am. A lot of the top. What I think is standing at that America has had historical hostility toward the military in the short. Are that we're not seeing more production way and are you after the Cold War because again with the idea that someone inside the country could be doing something wrong crappy sex and then perhaps you know today. The war on fox hill staying. But in the game. In the beginning at things really they didn't want to have that that it happened on the part that what they want to keep. Didn't protecting her and what happened the military power. And that that kind of partner that interest and that we serve particularly not model not written and. Well and you mentioned that the separation of powers between the police and the military. Most people are familiar with the beaten with a phrase posse coma Thomas act. And here in the south that really has. More meaning that possibly other places because it was. It was that act that was passed in the late eighteen hundreds but said no we're not gonna use the military has a police force. In the reconstructed confederacy that's gonna end and so that's where you know and that's where that came from. And your right that was something of kind of a gold standard you know on a line that you didn't cross. Until. Perhaps in the last twenty years or so. Yeah. Yeah. And I think what's interesting. It isn't for me as well that. But it really shows that it did in and I think in the empire at certain comments they. Are the kind of inflation. Capital of memory and right to the south as you say how rhetorical calling out of their patrol. I'm Aaron. A kind of vigilant hasn't he could eat pray and former slaves after the civil war. I'm under trouble in the race and man in the north in the city like Boston and New York mr. developing miracle worker becomes kind of wait for. Economic control out you know. We need production and I giving him low wage workers to do their job not gonna happen not I have. On the green shorts he comes despite being on the street right and that idea was spectacle or something that's are people doing something. I'm at the eight and want them to do I'm can have that fact gap and control. Well and you you mention new York and you mentioned you know the economic aspect of it you know we saw in the last few years a man was selling Lucy's you know single cigarettes on the sidewalk. Was basically executed on the street. For doing that by the new York city police depart. So it is that something that I'm in China and people may not look at that is necessarily an economic control thing. But when you really come down to it that's what I was there was you know a prohibition on selling acts in the given circumstances. It was legal and other circumstances. Yeah something that even if it wasn't you know harassed her. I would probably be either spot it would it back. And so again there that the current example everybody else I might be into the XQ someone argued saying on the street. Any and the ones you and actually it's been listening. The number and protesters order. Were protesting the equivalent. There was a brief moment on the clothing and let the air their brief moment where the officer to our contractors and there in the streets. That street are streak. Come September right near the it's up against them mentality are being used against. You know the United States' own citizens. On and the kind of triumphant spectacle police power commentary much spectacular yeah. And we're talking with doctor Kathryn Andersen. Who's going to be giving a lecture tomorrow the Ming to Queen's University on a monsters and militarized men police terrorism and 1865. And 2017. How well let me ask you another question and how do we how do we change this mentality should it be changed. One question that I saw posed in. In in this whole concept of policing was should any group of people claim a license to commit aggressive violence. In the name of imposing order. Based on that fundamental question where do we go from here can we change it should it be changed are we on the right path. Do we need more of it or less. I mean I think. This one of the things that I'm working on you know I've I've other write this book and I've been thinking about a lot. And I think that the level individual police department. I'm moving back to or attempting to move back to a kind of model of community policing might be delayed to go right. My search I found that. The police. Apartments ten accord to be you know primarily and people who are police saying neighborhood of color for example usually. Don't necessarily clear there that's been played here about certain barons are currently. Having officers spend more time in her new that he can credit. Retraining every morning and non active duty of protecting and serving their. You know trying to achieve this external enemy I'm might he won so. At the level. Institutional policy. Earn you know I've been thinking a lot about liberalism hasn't been a lot about hypocrisy isn't kind of we're in much. Very way we think about. Our nation and my have to change a reminder to acknowledge their bank. On its network or socialist or all of them are older and you know upper level articulate policies saying South Carolina are very. Important point I'm sorry about it. I'm so that serve on the ground chronically ill and the higher level deals that are out there. And or but I also wanna ask your question about. Winston Churchill. A name you're probably familiar with. The city's that he British history. He was supposedly said if you make 101000 regulations you destroy all respect for the law. What if that's true. What is it surprising in your mind when young people similar no respect for law enforcement. But doesn't that seem to kind of go hand in hand if you destroy respect for the law. That those and enforce the law are not an irishman rather. Welcome to staying I think I don't offer it I think they respect for people you're except for. Being. The facility. Rate that we we see as a result of the policy as a result of the way it etched. We've seen and enter the police terror on police brutality. Consistently over an elder I actually went out and principal. I graduated and paper complete brutality currently economic you know. Happening and people talking about it still are the only doctor and not so I'd change. And I have to do something. To our. To integrate the police escort and our communities again and make them part of the rather than. You know something or some sort of getting on the other side of the aisle are not as fine. Do you think that we could return to a more constabulary. Type of model. And it can take what's mr. peel started in an eighteen in the 1920s in London. As our as our basis and a return to more of a constabulary. Which really kind of operates more like a fire department. That is unless the police are called for a specific thing. You know if there is no victim there is no crime kind of mentality that you have to demonstrate you know there is a victim. You know pull fire departments don't go don't go running around it in breaking the people's houses looking for a voter overloaded circuits. Or. So could. Do you think we might be able to get to that point ever. Where they it's viewed I was then it would be more because everybody loves the fire. I mean let's face it they're gonna help you're at it says exactly how to treat sick not on a regular basis get the bucket truck boys we got another cabinetry. So but in there's a whole different mind set when it comes to police and law enforcement. Can we might that be a better model to go to. As opposed to what we have now where you know police officers seemed to think their job is to enforce all the laws. And we've got a lot of eyes you wouldn't that be wonderful we cut the practicality of that sort of caught during OJ. A radical reorientation of the way it went I think that the police source in that trial and the content train and number. Earned but I do think. If we can get their ticket to that idea. I'm here for my community and helping my community that's mayoral. It would change that would be individual interactions in the moment that situation I. Last hour that it's here now. I'm I was reading a study at the exact number here apparently in the UK and 19100. Opera like 102015. They had 52 people who were killed. By police. And that entire. And thinking years it was 62 people. On and that just got the the play at a leading our public comparing that Q how many bats for that then we'll. To a market when it hit the United States with something like. Another Q I think so. You know those statistics right there into the different sperm. And a hundred cooking your comment to people have died. Because of the police force and the UK on the security. What does that speak more about the populace when a police would you say. Act with a cracked and I think that either way. They're ever. Black he's the military attitude of the military cap that at least the query term. And the quick word from the Indian population as well. Here in the United States and right now entering into the top administration straying. We're seeing a lot of toxin notes rising popularity of the air and we export the problem and stop the constantly. You hate and vitriol and burn people want to for the violence so I'm here. We need it and you turn around. Well and and of course you know I I would I guess I would say kind of continues under the trump administration. For all his fault he didn't you know he does. He didn't start the swat teams and in Los Angeles in 68 that's true and I mean we've had it's it's kind of like and equal opportunity. Sort of situation that word that we're looking at here in Ferguson occurred under the Obama administration. For good at so. Gathered at a certain kind of bleeding out you know I'm not very private jets right here from. The police force them out into the general population my action and you know an executive for parents and all of not yet heard come around everywhere now. And doctor Katherine Anderson we appreciate you being here on Carolina focus you're gonna be Queen's University tomorrow evening. And giving a talk on this very subject and I believe that starts at 1:8 o'clock. The current model for eight to ten and that's it queens university. Kept their auditorium at 8 o'clock in the Sykes building at Queen's University. And doctor Kathryn Andersen we appreciate you being here on Carolina focus and we hope you enjoy your stay in Charlotte. It's not California I can tell you that although some people wanna McCain or whether I. What we're trying to be California and a half a a ball great I appreciate you being here in hope you have a blessed day and I think travels through YouTube from them. I'm your host mark Thomas and thanks for listening to Carolina focus on these 1110993. WB PD. 1079 Malloy. One point 56 from the fan. Also available to podcasted WP keep that job.
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