Access to health care

Margie Barton, a financial counselor at the IU Health Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, is photographed in the lobby of the hospital, Wednesday, June 7, 2017, in Indianapolis. Barton helps to explain how health benefits works once patients arrive at the hospital. Shrinking insurance coverage and soaring treatment costs can swamp patients with piles of unexpected bills. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
June 07, 2017 - 11:47 am
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The financial counselor will see you now. Many people hit with a terrifying medical diagnosis like cancer also have to deal with another worry: whether the care will bankrupt them. Insurance that covers less and soaring treatment costs can swamp patients with piles of unexpected...
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In this May 26, 2017 photo, Lisa Dammert and her husband, Patrick, pose at their home in Franklin, Tenn. As a thyroid cancer survivor battling nerve damage and other complications, Lisa was in such dire financial straits in 2014 that she and her husband let their health insurance lapse, putting them in a category with some 6 million Americans who have gone without coverage at times despite serious health problems. That group and millions of others who have had a gap in insurance could face higher charges under the Republican health care bill that recently passed the House. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
May 31, 2017 - 3:53 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — As a thyroid cancer survivor battling nerve damage and other complications, Lisa Dammert was in such dire financial straits in 2014 that she and her husband did the unthinkable: They let their health insurance lapse for a while. If the Dammerts and some of the millions of...
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In this Tuesday, May 23, 2017, photo, Dawn Erin poses for a photo at her home, in Austin, Texas. Erin was among more than 20 million Americans who gained coverage under Affordable Care Act. The health law helped push uninsured rates to historic lows and also aimed to bring the newly insured back into the primary care system to improve their health. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
May 28, 2017 - 10:43 am
Dawn Erin went nearly 20 years without health insurance before the Affordable Care Act, bouncing between free clinics for frequent and painful bladder infections. The liver-destroying disease hepatitis C made her ineligible for coverage until President Barack Obama's law barred insurers from...
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House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
May 26, 2017 - 1:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans trying to repeal and replace former President Barack Obama's health care law are grappling with a hard lesson that vexed him: Quality health insurance isn't cheap, especially if it protects people in poor health, older adults not yet eligible for Medicare, and the poor...
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Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah talk to a reporter as he steps onto the Capitol Subway on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 24, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
May 25, 2017 - 3:35 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress' official budget analyst is projecting that the House Republican health care bill would produce 23 million more uninsured people and costly, perhaps unaffordable coverage for the seriously ill. Now Republicans in the Senate have to decide how to make their version...
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Graphic shows Congressional Budget Office estimates of uninsured and deficit reduction under Republican bill; 2c x 5 inches; 96.3 mm x 127 mm;
May 25, 2017 - 12:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The health care bill Republicans recently pushed through the House would leave 23 million more Americans without insurance and confront others who have costly medical conditions with coverage that could prove unaffordable, Congress' official budget analysts said Wednesday...
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Graphic shows Congressional Budget Office estimates of uninsured and deficit reduction under Republican bill; 2c x 5 inches; 96.3 mm x 127 mm;
May 24, 2017 - 6:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The health care bill that Republicans recently pushed through the House would leave 23 million more Americans without insurance and confront many others who have costly medical conditions with coverage that could prove unaffordable, Congress' official budget analysts said...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., right, accompanied by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., meets with reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 23, 2017, following after a Republican policy luncheon. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
May 24, 2017 - 5:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The health care bill Republicans have pushed through the House would leave 23 million additional people uninsured in 2026 compared to President Barack Obama's health care law, the Congressional Budget Office said Wednesday. The GOP bill would lower average premiums, but in part...
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FILE--In this April 26, 2017, file photo, supporters of single-payer health care march to the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. State experts say a California bill that would provide government-funded health coverage for everyone in the state would cost $400 billion and require significant tax increases. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)
May 22, 2017 - 7:05 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A California bill that would eliminate health insurance companies and provide government-funded health coverage for everyone in the state would cost $400 billion and require significant tax increases, legislative analysts said Monday. Much of the cost would be offset by...
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FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2016 file photo, the HealthCare.gov 2017 web site home page is seen on a laptop in Washington. After five consecutive years of coverage gains, progress reducing the number of uninsured Americans stalled in 2016, according to a government report that highlights the stakes as Republicans try to roll back Barack Obama’s law. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 28.6 million people were uninsured last year, unchanged from 2015. The uninsured rate was 9 percent, not a significant change from 9.1 percent in 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
May 16, 2017 - 11:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Five years of progress reducing the number of Americans without health insurance has come to a halt, according to a government report out Tuesday. More than a factoid, it shows the stakes in the Republican drive to roll back the Affordable Care Act. The report from the Centers for...
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