Accounting

FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee ranking member Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asks a question during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the “significant others” of the company’s top executives, according to a Pentagon audit. McCaskill summarized the audit’s major findings in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that she was releasing on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 09, 2017 - 12:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A British company hired to train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for high-end cars, including Porsches and an Aston Martin, and paid the "significant others" of the firm's top executives six-figure salaries even though there's no proof they did any work,...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee ranking member Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asks a question during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the “significant others” of the company’s top executives, according to a Pentagon audit. McCaskill summarized the audit’s major findings in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that she was releasing on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 09, 2017 - 11:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the "significant others" of the company's top executives, according to a...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo, Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee ranking member Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., asks a question during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the “significant others” of the company’s top executives, according to a Pentagon audit. McCaskill summarized the audit’s major findings in a letter to Defense Secretary Jim Mattis that she was releasing on Aug. 9. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
August 09, 2017 - 9:58 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A British company hired to help train Afghan intelligence officers billed the U.S. government for more than $50 million in questionable expenses that included luxury cars and exorbitant salaries paid to the "significant others" of the company's top executives, according to a...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 05, 2017 - 9:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the next several years, raising the question whether that's something Americans should fear. There's no easy answer. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States has worked...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 05, 2017 - 2:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the next several years, raising the question whether that's something Americans should fear. There's no easy answer. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States has worked...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 05, 2017 - 9:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the next several years, raising the question whether that's something Americans should fear. There's no easy answer. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States has worked...
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July 25, 2017 - 4:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The IRS is seeing a big drop in the number of identity theft victims after the agency teamed up with tax preparers to fight the problem, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said Tuesday. The number of victims was nearly cut in half last year, compared to the previous year. At the same...
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July 25, 2017 - 1:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The IRS says it is seeing a big drop in the number of tax refunds being stolen by identity thieves after the agency teamed up with tax preparers to fight the problem. IRS Commissioner John Koskinen said Tuesday that the number of victims was nearly cut in half last year, compared...
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FILE - In this May 9, 2017, file photo, then-Utah Jazz forward Gordon Hayward talks to the media during the NBA teams end of season press conference in Salt Lake City. When it comes to the IRS, the dollars connected to a player’s contract don’t tell the whole story about how much he’s going to be making. Where a player choses to play _ the Boston Celtics or the Miami Heat _ could go a long way in determining how much money he ends up receiving. Robert Raiola, who includes many professional athletes among his clients in his role as director of sports and entertainment for the PKF O’Connor Davies accounting firm, cites former Utah Jazz forward Gordon Hayward’s recent deal with the Celtics as an example. (Kristin Murphy/The Deseret News via AP, File)
July 14, 2017 - 4:55 pm
With the mind-boggling money being doled out in NBA contracts, players don't seem to be overly concerned about state taxes — or the lack of them. Stephen Curry signed a $201 million deal with Golden State and Blake Griffin got a $175 million from the Los Angeles Clippers. The rub: In California,...
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Col. Serhiy Demydiuk, the head of Ukraine's national CyberPolice unit talks during an interview with the Associated Press in his office in Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, July 3, 2017. The small Ukrainian tax software company that is accused of being the patient zero of a damaging global cyberepidemic is under investigation and will face charges, Col. Serhiy Demydiuk suggested Monday. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
July 03, 2017 - 6:16 pm
KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — The small Ukrainian tax software company that is accused of being the patient zero of a damaging global cyberepidemic is under investigation and will face charges, the head of Ukraine's CyberPolice suggested Monday. Col. Serhiy Demydiuk, the head of Ukraine's national...
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