Agriculture and food technology

FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2019, file photo is an Uber office in Secaucus, N.J. Uber continued to lose cash as it poured money into building its food delivery business and developing technology for driverless cars, but revenue for its rides business nearly tripled as the company picked up more passengers around the world. The ride-hailing giant lost $1.1 billion in the fourth quarter of 2019, about 24% more than it lost at the same time last year. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
February 06, 2020 - 6:37 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Uber is still losing money as it expands its food delivery business and develops technology for driverless cars. But revenue for its rides business nearly tripled in the final three months of last year as the company picked up more passengers around the world. That prompted it to...
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In this Dec. 4, 2019, photo cows are milked on a large carousel at the Rosendale Dairy in Pickett, Wis. At Rosendale Dairy, each of the 9,000 cows has a microchip implanted in an ear that workers can scan with smartphones for up-to-the-minute information on how the animal is doing, everything from their nutrition to their health history to their productivity. (AP Photo/Morry Gash)
February 02, 2020 - 1:23 pm
PICKETT, Wis. (AP) — At Rosendale Dairy, each of the 9,000 cows has a microchip implanted in an ear that workers can scan with smartphones for up-to-the-minute information on how the animal is doing — everything from their nutrition to their health history to their productivity. Feed is calibrated...
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Joel Gamoran, of Yummly, demonstrates the Whirlpool Yummly temperature gauge at the CES Unveiled media preview event, Sunday, Jan. 5, 2020, in Las Vegas. The smart thermometer consists of a probe and a dock, which communicate to each other and to the Yummly mobile app via Bluetooth, monitoring the temperature of the food and the temperature inside the oven. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
January 08, 2020 - 4:25 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Tell your refrigerator about your dietary preferences and it’ll concoct a recipe plan for the coming week, sending a shopping list to your smartphone when it notices you’ve run out of the right ingredients. Counter-top robotic arms help chop veggies. Artificially intelligent oven...
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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 1:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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This Friday, May 24, 2019 photo shows the "sell by" date for a jug of milk in New York. In May 2019, U.S. regulators are again urging food makers to reduce the variety of terms like "best by" and "use by" that cause confusion about when food should be thrown out. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
June 06, 2019 - 9:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If milk is a few days past its "Sell By" date, is it safe to drink? U.S. regulators are urging food-makers to be more consistent with labeling terms like "Best By" and "Enjoy By" that cause confusion. By clarifying the meaning of such dates, they are trying to prevent people from...
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This 2009 photo provided by AquaBountyTechnologies shows a juvenile salmon raised at the company's hatchery in Fortune, Prince Edward Island, Canada. On Friday, March 8, 2019, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had lifted an alert had that had prevented AquaBounty from importing its salmon eggs to its Indiana facility, where they would be grown before being sold as food. (AquaBountyTechnologies via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 10:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday gave the green light to salmon genetically modified to grow about twice as fast as normal, but the company behind it may face legal challenges before the fish can be sold domestically. The Food and Drug Administration said it lifted an alert that had...
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The 2018 Nobel Chemistry laureate, Frances H. Arnold poses during the traditional Nobel Chair Signing ceremony at the Nobel Museum in Stockholm, Sweden, on Thursday Dec. 6, 2018. (Claudio Brescian/TT via AP)
December 07, 2018 - 5:39 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Winners of this year's Nobel Prize for Chemistry say that excessive concerns about genetically modified foods and other substances can inhibit mankind from benefiting from developments in the field. Frances Arnold from the United States and Gregory Winter of Britain made the...
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Fred Gmitter, a geneticist at the University of Florida Citrus Research and Education Center, right, visits a citrus grower in an orange grove affected by citrus greening disease in Fort Meade, Fla., on Sept. 27, 2018. "If we can go in and edit the gene, change the DNA sequence ever so slightly by one or two letters, potentially we'd have a way to defeat this disease," says Gmitter. (AP Photo/Federica Narancio)
November 14, 2018 - 11:53 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The next generation of biotech food is headed for the grocery aisles, and first up may be salad dressings or granola bars made with soybean oil genetically tweaked to be good for your heart. By early next year, the first foods from plants or animals that had their DNA "edited" are...
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This 2013 photo provided by the Boyce Thompson Institute shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. In an opinion paper published Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field. (Meena Haribal/Boyce Thompson Institute via AP)
October 04, 2018 - 4:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon. In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the...
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This undated photo provided by the J.R. Simplot Company shows a sign outside the J.R. Simplot Company in Boise. Idaho-based J.R. Simplot Company has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. The company on Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, announced the agreement with DowDuPont Inc. and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, developers of the nascent gene editing technology. (J.R. Simplot Company via AP)
August 06, 2018 - 1:44 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — A multinational agricultural company based in Idaho has acquired gene editing licensing rights that could one day be used to help farmers produce more crops and make grocery store offerings such as strawberries, potatoes and avocados stay fresher longer. J.R. Simplot Company on...
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