Atmospheric science

In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
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FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 28, 2017 file photo, floodwaters from Tropical Storm Harvey overflow from Buffalo Bayou in downtown Houston, Texas. A study released on Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 says that between being tripped up by downtown and the bigger effect of massive paving and building up of the metro area to reduce drainage, development in Houston on average increased the extreme flooding risk by 21 times. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
November 14, 2018 - 1:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Humans helped make recent devastating U.S. hurricanes wetter but in different ways, two new studies find. Hurricane Harvey snagged on the skyscrapers of Houston, causing it to slow and dump more rain than it normally would, one study found. The city's massive amounts of paving had...
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Flames climb trees as the Camp Fire tears through Paradise, Calif., on Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
November 13, 2018 - 12:59 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Both nature and humans share blame for California's devastating wildfires, but forest management did not play a major role, despite President Donald Trump's claims, fire scientists say. Nature provides the dangerous winds that have whipped the fires, and human-caused climate...
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In this Oct. 8, 2018 photo, shows the entrance to the Chacaltaya atmospheric observatory, at Chacaltaya mountain, Bolivia. The station is an important place to collect data samples partly due to its own location on the remnants of a glacier. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)
November 08, 2018 - 12:35 am
LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — The snow appears to be pristine on the Andean peaks that loom above Bolivia's capital, but even here ash and smog reach up to a remote plateau that is home to the world's highest atmospheric observatory. It's an ideal site for a team of international scientists who collect...
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November 01, 2018 - 5:43 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Department of Agriculture's plans to restructure its top independent research office will be reviewed by the agency's internal watchdog. Some lawmakers and staff are worried the plan to move the Economic Research Service out of the District of Columbia and change its...
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October 24, 2018 - 2:23 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Climatologists say conditions are right for development of an El Nino weather pattern that could bring wetter than normal conditions this winter in drought-stricken area of the southwestern U.S. But weather researchers said Wednesday that even if an El Nino occurs, that doesn't...
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FILE - In this April 30, 2014, file photo, Dustin Shaw lifts debris as he searches through what is left of his sister's house at Parkwood Meadows neighborhood after a tornado in Vilonia, Ark. A new study finds that tornado activity is generally shifting eastward to areas just east of the Mississippi River that are more vulnerable such as Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee. And it's going down in Oklahoma, Kansas and Texas. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston, File)
October 17, 2018 - 6:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting — decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain why. Tornado activity is increasing most in Mississippi...
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FILE - In this Oct. 22, 2015, file photo, workers tend to oil pump jacks behind a natural gas flare near Watford City, N.D. Since Donald Trump took office, America’s exports of liquid natural gas and crude oil have surged, rivaling the likes of Saudi Arabia and Russia. To achieve “energy dominance,” the Trump administration has taken its cues from an unlikely source: the Obama administration. (AP photo/Eric Gay, File)
October 16, 2018 - 5:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Energy Secretary Rick Perry's keynote speech at the World Gas Conference in June opened with a marching band and ended with an exhibition by the Harlem Globetrotters. It was a spectacle befitting the industry symposium. "We're sharing our energy bounty with the world," Perry...
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FILE--In this June 18, 1997, file p photo, Microsoft co-founder and billionaire Paul Allen joins in with the band and plays electric guitar at an election night victory party in the early morning hours in Seattle. Allen, billionaire owner of the Portland Trail Blazers and the Seattle Seahawks and Microsoft co-founder, died Monday, Oct. 15, 2018 at age 65. Earlier this month Allen said the cancer he was treated for in 2009, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, had returned (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, file)
October 16, 2018 - 2:12 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Personal computers, conservation, pro football, rock n' roll and rocket ships: Paul G. Allen couldn't have asked for a better way to spend, invest and donate the billions he reaped from co-founding Microsoft with childhood friend Bill Gates. Allen used the fortune he made from...
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FILE - This Wednesday, April 19, 2017 file photo shows the beer cooler behind the counter in a convenience store in Sheridan, Ind. In future sweltering years with a double whammy of heat and drought, losses of barley yield can be as much as 17 percent, computer simulations show. And that means “beer prices would, on average, double,” even adjusting for inflation, said a study published in the journal Nature Plants on Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
October 15, 2018 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says global warming may leave people crying in their costlier beer. The international study says bouts of extreme heat waves and drought will cut production of barley, a key ingredient of beer. When that happens, beer prices on average could double. In countries like...
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