Beetles

In this undated photo issued by Entomologist’s Monthly Magazine, showing the new species of beetle Nelloptodes gretae, named after Swedish environmental campaigner Greta Thunberg. The scientific paper written by Michael Darby is published in Entomologist’s Monthly Magazine Friday Oct. 25, 2019, describes and names the new species of beetle Nelloptodes gretae that measures about one Millimetre (0.04 inch) long. (Michael Darby/Entomologist’s Monthly Magazine via AP)
October 25, 2019 - 12:25 pm
LONDON (AP) — Climate activist Greta Thunberg has a tiny new namesake. London's Natural History Museum said Friday that a minute species of beetle is being named "Nelloptodes gretae" in honor of the 16-year-old Swede who has pressed the world to do a better job fighting climate change. Michael...
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An aerial photo taken Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Bethany Beach, Del., shows a wooden road built on pilings in one of the freshwater wetlands in coastal Delaware where the Bethany Beach Firefly, which some environmentalists want added to the federal Endangered Species List, has been previously found. (AP Photo/Gary Emeigh)
August 02, 2019 - 9:23 am
BETHANY BEACH, Del. (AP) — Environmental groups are hoping a rare bug found only along Delaware's southern coast will become the first firefly on the federal endangered species list. They say the Bethany Beach Firefly and its unique freshwater wetland habitat face threats including coastal...
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In this Tuesday, July 9, 2019 photo Northern Arizona University researcher Matt Johnson looks for tamarisk beetles along the Verde River in Clarkdale, Ariz. The beetles were brought to the U.S. from Asia to devour invasive tamarisk, or salt cedar, trees. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)
July 26, 2019 - 8:16 pm
CLARKDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves. He counts spiders, ants and leafhoppers among the catch and few...
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FILE - This Oct. 21, 2009, file photo shows ladybugs on a vehicle in Chatham, Ill. A huge blob that appeared on the National Weather Service's radar wasn't a rain cloud, but a massive swarm of ladybugs over Southern California. Meteorologist Joe Dandrea says the array of bugs appeared to be about 80 miles (129 kilometers) wide as it flew over San Diego Tuesday, June 4, 2019. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)
June 05, 2019 - 8:29 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A huge blob that appeared on the National Weather Service's radar wasn't a rain cloud, but a massive swarm of ladybugs over Southern California. Meteorologist Joe Dandrea says the array of bugs appeared to be about 80 miles (129 kilometers) wide as it flew over San Diego Tuesday...
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This combination of undated photos provided by Brett Ratcliffe in December 2018 shows, from left, Gymnetis drogoni, Gymnetis rhaegali and Gymnetis viserioni beetles from South America. Ratcliffe named three of his eight newest beetle discoveries after the dragons from the HBO series "Game of Thrones" and George R.R. Martin book series "A Song of Ice and Fire." (Brett Ratcliffe via AP)
December 30, 2018 - 1:10 pm
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A Nebraska entomologist has named three of his eight newest beetle discoveries after the dragons from the HBO series "Game of Thrones" and George R.R. Martin book series "A Song of Ice and Fire." University of Nebraska-Lincoln professor Brett Ratcliffe named the new scarab...
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November 22, 2018 - 4:59 pm
OTTAWA, Ontario (AP) — Jose Bautista has a new namesake buzzing around. Entomologist Bob Anderson of the Canadian Museum of Nature has dubbed a newly discovered species of beetle Sicoderus bautistai after the former Toronto Blue Jays star. Anderson decided to name the insect — known as a weevil for...
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FILE - In this July 21, 2016 file photo, fireflies light up in synchronized bursts as photographers take long-exposure pictures, inside Piedra Canteada, a tourist camp cooperatively owned by 42 local families, inside an old-growth forest near the town of Nanacamilpa, Tlaxcala state, Mexico. A study released on Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018 in the journal Science Advances, says that fireflies seem to use their lights to tell bats they taste bad. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
August 22, 2018 - 2:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study finds that fireflies flash not just for survival, not just sex. Scientists already know that lightning bugs used their signature blinking glow to find a mate, but they suspected something else was going on. Boise State University researchers found it also keeps them...
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July 18, 2018 - 6:25 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon is objecting to a Republican proposal in a defense policy bill that would bar the Fish and Wildlife Service from using the Endangered Species Act to protect two chicken-like birds in the western half of the U.S. The Defense Department says in a position paper made...
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March 02, 2018 - 6:44 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Clyde Sorenson, North Carolina State University; Elsa Youngsteadt, North Carolina State University, and Rebecca Irwin, North Carolina State University (THE CONVERSATION) The Venus...
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December 20, 2017 - 6:01 am
COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka's plantation minister on Wednesday denied that the country's agricultural products, including its famous Ceylon tea, are dangerous, days after Russia imposed a temporary ban on such goods. Russian agriculture safety watchdog Rosselkhoznadzor banned all imports of...
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