Biochemistry

FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2002, file photo, Sydney Brenner, a professor in the Molecular Sciences Institute in Berkeley, Calif., gestures during a press conference in Munich, Germany. Brenner, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist who helped decipher the genetic code and whose research on a roundworm laid the groundwork for decades of human disease research, has died. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California said Brenner died Friday, April 5, 2019 in Singapore. He was 92. (AP Photo/Jan Pitman, File)
April 06, 2019 - 6:01 pm
LA JOLLA, Calif. (AP) — Sydney Brenner, a Nobel Prize-winning biologist who helped decipher the genetic code and whose research on a roundworm sparked a new field of human disease research, has died. He was 92. The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in California, where Brenner spent part of his...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 12:36 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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A scientist at the NY Genome Center in New York demonstrates equipment used in single-cell RNA analysis on Wednesday, Sept. 26, 2018. Until recently, trying to study key traits of cells from people and other animals often meant analyzing bulk samples of tissue, producing an average of results from many cell types. But scientists have developed techniques that let them directly study the DNA codes, and its chemical cousin RNA, the activity of genes and other traits of individual cells. (AP Photo/Malcolm Ritter)
March 04, 2019 - 6:29 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Did you hear what happened when Bill Gates walked into a bar? Everybody there immediately became millionaires — on average. That joke about a very rich man is an old one among statisticians. So why did Peter Smibert use it to explain a revolution in biology? Because it shows...
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In this Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019, photo Plop, a rescue dog owned by Lisa Topol is seen New York. Topol recently had the DNA tested on both her mixed-breed dogs. Genetic testing for dogs has grown rapidly in recent years, fueled by companies marketing kits that offer to decode dogs’ heritage and health as simply, or laboriously, as owners can swab a canine cheek. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
February 11, 2019 - 10:39 am
NEW YORK (AP) — As people peer into DNA for clues to health and heritage, man's best friend is under the microscope, too. Genetic testing for dogs has surged in recent years, fueled by companies that echo popular at-home tests for humans, offering a deep dive into a pet's genes with the swab of a...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 17, 2015 file photo, U.S. Nobel laureate biologist James Watson visits the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia. Watson, who lost his job in 2007 for expressing racist views, was stripped of several honorary titles on Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. (AP Photo/Ivan Sekretarev)
January 11, 2019 - 5:43 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — James Watson, the Nobel Prize-winning DNA scientist who lost his job in 2007 for expressing racist views, was stripped of several honorary titles Friday by the New York lab he once headed. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory said it was reacting to Watson's remarks in a television...
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He Jiankui, a Chinese researcher, center, speaks during the Human Genome Editing Conference in Hong Kong, Wednesday, Nov. 28, 2018. He made his first public comments about his claim to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
November 29, 2018 - 7:09 am
HONG KONG (AP) — The Latest on a Chinese scientist's claim to have made the world's first gene-edited babies (all times local): 7:30 p.m. China's government has ordered a halt to work by a medical team that claimed to have helped make the world's first gene-edited babies. Vice Minister of Science...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 27, 2018 - 6:40 pm
SHENZHEN, China (AP) — The Chinese scientist who says he helped make the world's first gene-edited babies veered off a traditional career path, keeping much of his research secret in pursuit of a larger goal — making history. He Jiankui's outsized aspirations began to take shape in 2016, the year...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui speaks during an interview at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 26, 2018 - 5:35 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Scientists and bioethics experts reacted with shock, anger and alarm Monday to a Chinese researcher's claim that he helped make the world's first genetically edited babies. He Jiankui of Southern University of Science and Technology of China said he altered the DNA of twin girls...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, He Jiankui is reflected in a glass panel as he works at a computer at a laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese scientist He claims he helped make world's first genetically edited babies: twin girls whose DNA he said he altered. He revealed it Monday, Nov. 26, in Hong Kong to one of the organizers of an international conference on gene editing. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
November 26, 2018 - 9:16 am
HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world's first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life. If true, it would be a profound leap of science and ethics...
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FILE - In this Friday, April 27, 2018 file photo, Joseph James DeAngelo, 72, who authorities suspect is the "Golden State Killer" responsible for at least a dozen murders and 50 rapes in the 1970s and 80s, is accompanied by Sacramento County Public Defender Diane Howard, right, during his arraignment in Sacramento County Superior Court in Sacramento, Calif. Authorities said they used a genetic genealogy website to connect some crime-scene DNA to DeAngelo. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 11, 2018 - 2:01 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A new study estimates that about 60 percent of the U.S. population with European heritage may be identifiable from their DNA by searching consumer websites, even if they've never made their own genetic information available. That number is expected to grow as more and more people...
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