Biochemistry

James Allison, one of the 2018 Nobel Prize winners for medicine, speaks during a press conference, Monday, Oct. 1, 2018, in New York. Allison and Tasuku Honjo won the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discoveries that help the body marshal its cellular troops to attack invading cancers. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
October 01, 2018 - 4:00 pm
Two researchers from the U.S. and Japan won the Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday for discoveries that have revolutionized cancer care, turning the body's immune system loose to fight tumors in an approach credited with saving an untold number of lives. James Allison of the University of Texas M.D...
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FILE - In this Sept. 18, 2015 file photo Dr. James P. Allison, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, poses for a photo in New York. James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo are jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology Monday, Oct. 1, 2018. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, file)
October 01, 2018 - 10:38 am
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Latest on the 2018 Nobel Prizes (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Nobel winner James Allison of The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center says more basic research is needed to help cancer patients. Allison won the 2018 Nobel Prize in medicine on Monday along with Tasuku...
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In this 2011 photo provided by Bence Viola of the University of Toronto, researchers excavate a cave for Denisovan fossils in the Altai Krai area of Russia. On Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, scientists reported in the journal Nature that they have found the remains of an ancient female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. (Bence Viola/Department of Anthropology - University of Toronto/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology via AP)
August 22, 2018 - 1:05 pm
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they've found the remains of a prehistoric female whose mother was a Neanderthal and whose father belonged to another extinct group of human relatives known as Denisovans. The 90,000-year-old bone fragment found in southern Siberia marks the first time a direct...
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August 13, 2018 - 2:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — You know your cholesterol, your blood pressure ... your heart gene score? Researchers say a new way of analyzing genetic test data may one day help identify people at high risk of a youthful heart attack in time to help. Today, gene testing mostly focuses on rare mutations in one...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2017, file photo, Stephanie Richurk, a nurse at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, sorts blood samples collected from participants in the "All of Us" research program in Pittsburgh. The National Institutes of Health announced on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, that it will open nationwide enrollment and is seeking 1 million volunteers to share their DNA and medical records. (AP Photo/Dake Kang, File)
May 01, 2018 - 10:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Wanted: A million people willing to share their DNA and 10 years of health habits, big and small, for science. On Sunday, the U.S. government will open nationwide enrollment for an ambitious experiment: If they can build a large enough database comparing the genetics, lifestyles...
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CORRECTS LOCATION TO WHITEHOUSE, NOT SWANTON - This March 2017 photo provided by Heidi Bisbee shows Carly Kudzia, 7, with her mother, Heather Unsinger, in Whitehouse, Ohio. Carly participated in a study suggesting that the drug lonafarnib may extend life for children with progeria, a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging. Other kids "always think I'm a baby," Carly says. But "I'm a regular kid." (Heidi Bisbee via AP)
April 24, 2018 - 3:47 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Children with a rare, incurable disease that causes rapid aging and early death may live longer if treated with an experimental drug first developed for cancer patients, a study suggests. The small, preliminary study isn't proof the drug works and it found only a small benefit:...
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April 06, 2018 - 6:45 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Chip Colwell, University of Colorado Denver (THE CONVERSATION) The remains of a 6-inch long mummy from Chile are not those of a space alien, according to recently reported research. The...
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April 04, 2018 - 6:47 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Fabian V. Filipp, University of California, Merced (THE CONVERSATION) Because of advances in drug design and precision medicine, researchers have been able to target certain molecules...
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March 22, 2018 - 6:42 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Arunas L. Radzvilavicius, University of Pennsylvania (THE CONVERSATION) You probably know about the 23 pairs of chromosomes safely stowed in your cells’ nuclei. That’s where the vast...
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Dr. Sunil Singhal, second from right, directs a special camera to view a tumor in his patient made visible with a fluorescent dye, seen at monitor on right, at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018. Researchers are testing fluorescent dyes that make cancer cells glow to make them easier for surgeons to find, giving patients a better shot at survival. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
March 14, 2018 - 11:29 am
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — It was an ordinary surgery to remove a tumor — until doctors turned off the lights and the patient's chest started to glow. A spot over his heart shined purplish pink. Another shimmered in a lung. They were hidden cancers revealed by fluorescent dye, an advance that soon may...
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