Biochemistry

March 12, 2018 - 6:41 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Shawn Sorrells, University of California, San Francisco; Arturo Alvarez-Buylla, University of California, San Francisco, and Mercedes Paredes, University of California, San Francisco (...
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February 23, 2018 - 6:43 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Padmashree Rida, Georgia State University and Ritu Aneja, Georgia State University (THE CONVERSATION) White women in the U.S. are slightly more likely to develop breast cancer than...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 7:56 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers are working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. It was found...
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In this Feb. 9, 2018 photo, Chelsea Cobo holds her son, Christopher, in framed photos arranged as a shrine at her home in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Cobo disappeared in May of 2016. New DNA science developed to identify the skeletal remains of the 9/11 dead now serves another desperate need: helping families find long-missing loved ones, dead or alive. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
February 18, 2018 - 11:41 am
NEW YORK (AP) — For families who have searched years for missing loved ones, donating a sample of their DNA is often a last, desperate act to confirm their worst fears. New York City's medical examiner is leading a nationwide effort to collect genetic material and match it with unidentified human...
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In this Jan. 26, 2018 photo, Matt Chappell, right, is checked by Dr. Christopher Schiessl during an appointment at a medical center in San Francisco. For more than a decade, the strongest AIDS drugs could not fully control Chappell's HIV infection. Now his body does it by itself, thanks to the first gene editing experiments in people. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
February 13, 2018 - 1:27 am
For more than a decade, the strongest AIDS drugs could not fully control Matt Chappell's HIV infection. Now his body controls it by itself, and researchers are trying to perfect the gene editing that made this possible. Scientists removed some of his blood cells, disabled a gene to help them resist...
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FILE - In this September 2008 file photo, a physician discusses an ankle injury with a patient in Lawrence, Kan. Arthritis isn't always from the wear-and-tear of getting older _ too often, younger people get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. According to a study released Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, researchers are hunting for a new way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy factories that power cartilage cells. (Mike Yoder/The Lawrence Journal-World via AP)
February 07, 2018 - 2:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Arthritis isn't always from the wear and tear of getting older — younger adults too often get it after suffering knee or ankle injuries. Now researchers are hunting a way to stave off the damage, by targeting the little energy factories that power cartilage cells. University of...
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In this August 2013 photo provided by the University of Alaska, excavators work at the Upward Sun River discovery site in Alaska. According to a report released on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018, DNA from an infant who died in Alaska some 11,500 years ago, found at this site, is giving scientists the best look yet at the genetics of the ancestors of today’s native peoples of the Americas. (Ben Potter/University of Alaska via AP)
January 03, 2018 - 1:07 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — DNA from an infant who died in Alaska some 11,500 years ago is giving scientists the best look yet at the genetics of the ancestors of today's native peoples of the Americas. Decoding the infant's complete set of DNA let researchers estimate the timing of key events in the ancestral...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 6, 2017 file photo, Brian Madeux sits with his girlfriend Marcie Humphrey while waiting to receive the first human gene editing therapy at the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, Calif. Madeux, who has Hunter syndrome, received the treatment on Monday, Nov. 13. Gene therapy aims to treat the root cause of a problem by deleting, adding or altering DNA, rather than just treating symptoms that result from the genetic flaw. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
December 28, 2017 - 10:23 am
After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene...
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This undated photo provided by The Scripps Research Institute shows a semi-synthetic strain of E. coli bacteria that can churn out novel proteins. Scientists reported on Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017, that they have expanded the genetic code of life and used man-made DNA to create this strain of bacteria. (Bill Kiosses/The Scripps Research Institute via AP)
November 29, 2017 - 1:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are expanding the genetic code of life, using man-made DNA to create a semi-synthetic strain of bacteria — and new research shows those altered microbes actually worked to produce proteins unlike those found in nature. It's a step toward designer drug development. One...
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In this image provided by Nationwide Children's Hospital, Dr. Jerry Mendell of the Center for Gene Therapy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mendell led a small study of gene therapy in babies born with a usually fatal neuromuscular disease and reported Nov. 1, 2017, that the experiment extended the tots’ survival, and some could roll over or sit up. (Barb Consiglio/Nationwide Children's Hospital via AP)
November 01, 2017 - 5:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A first attempt at gene therapy for a disease that leaves babies unable to move, swallow and, eventually, breathe has extended the tots' lives, and some began to roll over, sit and stand on their own, researchers reported Wednesday. Only 15 babies with spinal muscular atrophy...
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