Biochemistry

October 31, 2017 - 12:07 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Ian Haydon, University of Washington (THE CONVERSATION) Our old friend Saccharomyces cerevisiae – the yeast that’s helped people bake bread and brew beer for millennia – has just had...
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FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2015 file photo, Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute of MIT participates in a panel discussion at the National Academy of Sciences international summit on the safety and ethics of human gene editing, in Washington. Scientists are altering a powerful gene-editing technology in hopes of one day fighting diseases without making permanent changes to people's DNA. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
October 25, 2017 - 2:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists are altering a powerful gene-editing technology in hopes of one day fighting diseases without making permanent changes to people's DNA. The trick: Edit RNA instead, the messenger that carries a gene's instructions. "If you edit RNA, you can have a reversible therapy,"...
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October 04, 2017 - 8:27 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Melanie Ohi, University of Michigan and Michael Cianfrocco, University of Michigan (THE CONVERSATION) Many people will never have heard of cryo-electron microscopy before the...
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Richard Henderson, one of the 2017 Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry, holds a bacterio rhodopsin model prior to a press conference at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York's Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
October 04, 2017 - 2:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Three researchers won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for developing a microscope technique that lets scientists see exquisite details of the molecules that drive life — basically providing a front-row seat to study these tiny performers in their biological dance. The Royal Swedish...
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Richard Henderson, one of the 2017 Nobel Prize winners in Chemistry, holds a bacterio rhodopsin model prior to a press conference at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017. Three researchers based in the U.S., U.K. and Switzerland won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developments in electron microscopy. The 9-million-kronor ($1.1 million) prize is shared by Jacques Dubochet of the University of Lausanne, Joachim Frank at New York's Columbia University and Richard Henderson of MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, Britain. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
October 04, 2017 - 2:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Three researchers won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for developing a microscope technique that lets scientists see exquisite details of the molecules that drive life — basically providing a front-row seat to study these tiny performers in their biological dance. The Royal Swedish...
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October 02, 2017 - 10:29 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Carrie L. Partch, University of California, Santa Cruz (THE CONVERSATION) Circadian rhythms control when we’re at our peak performance physically and mentally each day, keeping our...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 28, 2012 file photo, men from the Khoisan ethnic group sing in Cape Town, South Africa, during an event unveiling a new suggested name by them for Cape Town, which translates as, "Where the clouds gather." The Khoisan gathering placed emphasis on there race and ethnicity in South Africa. In a paper released Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017 by the journal Science, Mattias Jakobsson of Uppsala University in Sweden and co-authors put the earliest split in Homo sapiens they could detect at 260,000 to 350,000 years ago. That’s when ancestors of today’s Khoisan peoples diverged from the ancestors of other people, they calculated. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)
September 28, 2017 - 3:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A study of DNA from African fossils is providing new evidence that our species is a lot older than scientists had shown. It concludes Homo sapiens had appeared by at least 260,000 to 350,000 years ago. That fits with a fossil finding in Morocco that was reported in June, which...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 28, 2012 file photo, men from the Khoisan ethnic group sing in Cape Town, South Africa, during an event unveiling a new suggested name by them for Cape Town, which translates as, "Where the clouds gather." The Khoisan gathering placed emphasis on there race and ethnicity in South Africa. In a paper released Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017 by the journal Science, Mattias Jakobsson of Uppsala University in Sweden and co-authors put the earliest split in Homo sapiens they could detect at 260,000 to 350,000 years ago. That’s when ancestors of today’s Khoisan peoples diverged from the ancestors of other people, they calculated. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)
September 28, 2017 - 3:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A study of DNA from African fossils is providing new evidence that our species is a lot older than scientists had shown. It concludes Homo sapiens had appeared by at least 260,000 to 350,000 years ago. That fits with a fossil finding in Morocco that was reported in June, which...
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In this Aug. 7, 2017, photo, Kenneth Parker Ulrich, left, a research technician at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, prepares to collect a blood sample from Erricka Hager, a participant in the "All of Us" research program in Pittsburgh. The "All of Us" research program is run by the National Institutes of Health and plans to track the health of at least 1 million volunteers by 2019. By doing so, researchers hope to learn how to better tailor treatments and preventative care to people's genes, environments, and lifestyle. The University of Pittsburgh is running a pilot program with some of the first enrollees in the study. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)
September 25, 2017 - 4:09 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a quest to end cookie-cutter health care, U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact — and to finally customize ways to prevent and treat disease. Why does one...
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In this Aug. 7, 2017, photo, Kenneth Parker Ulrich, left, a research technician at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, prepares to collect a blood sample from Erricka Hager, a participant in the "All of Us" research program in Pittsburgh. The "All of Us" research program is run by the National Institutes of Health and plans to track the health of at least 1 million volunteers by 2019. By doing so, researchers hope to learn how to better tailor treatments and preventative care to people's genes, environments, and lifestyle. The University of Pittsburgh is running a pilot program with some of the first enrollees in the study. (AP Photo/Dake Kang)
September 25, 2017 - 8:52 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact. Today, health care is based on averages, what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients. The...
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