Biochemistry

September 13, 2017 - 6:30 pm
QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Scientists in Ecuador's Galapagos islands are hoping to restore a tortoise species believed extinct since the 1800s. The Chelonoidis elephantopus lived on Floreana Island and was captured by seamen in large numbers for food during long journeys across the Pacific. The species...
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September 13, 2017 - 6:30 pm
QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Scientists in Ecuador's Galapagos islands are hoping to restore a tortoise species believed extinct since the 1800s. The Chelonoidis elephantopus lived on Floreana Island and was captured by seamen in large numbers for food during long journeys across the Pacific. The species...
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This photo provided by the University of Texas at Austin, shows scientist Jialing Zhang as he demonstrates using the MasSpec Pen to analyze a human tissue sample. Scientists are developing a highly experimental pen-like probe to help surgeons better tell when it's safe to stop cutting or if stray tumor cells still lurk. (University of Texas at Austin via AP)
September 06, 2017 - 2:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Patients emerging from cancer surgery want to know, "Did you get it all?" Now scientists are developing a pen-like probe to help surgeons better tell when it's safe to stop cutting or if stray tumor cells still lurk. The device is highly experimental, but laboratory tests show it...
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National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins poses for a portrait at the NIH headquarters in Bethesda, Md., Friday, July 28, 2017. After DNA testing showed he was predisposed to Type 2 diabetes, which is more likely to develop if a person is overweight or obese, Collins shed 35 pounds (16 kilograms). (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
August 17, 2017 - 10:42 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy? You'd quit smoking, eat better, ramp up your exercise, or do whatever else it took to improve your odds of avoiding maladies like obesity, diabetes, heart disease or cancer,...
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National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins poses for a portrait at the NIH headquarters in Bethesda, Md., Friday, July 28, 2017. After DNA testing showed he was predisposed to Type 2 diabetes, which is more likely to develop if a person is overweight or obese, Collins shed 35 pounds (16 kilograms). (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
August 17, 2017 - 1:13 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If you learned your DNA made you more susceptible to getting a disease, wouldn't you work to stay healthy? You'd quit smoking, eat better, ramp up your exercise, or do whatever else it took to improve your odds of avoiding maladies like obesity, diabetes, heart disease or cancer,...
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August 15, 2017 - 9:39 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Five researchers will share a $500,000 medical prize for their roles in developing a groundbreaking gene-editing tool that lets scientists alter the DNA of living cells. The recipients of the annual Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research were announced...
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In this Tuesday, April 25, 2017 photo, post doctoral fellow Leslie Mitchell, works at her bench at a New York University lab in the Alexandria Center for Life Sciences in New York, where researchers are attempting to create completely man-made, custom-built DNA. Mitchell says it took her a couple months to build her chromosome but longer to debug. "The tiniest change in the code can have dramatic effect on growth,” she said. “We are learning new rules about how cells operate by building from scratch." (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
July 26, 2017 - 10:35 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Scientists are working to create yeast that operates with custom-made DNA. They have long been able to make specific changes in an organism's DNA. Now, they're pushing into the more radical step of starting over, and building redesigned versions from scratch. Their work is part of a...
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In this Tuesday, April 25, 2017 photo, assistant research technician Henri Berger, talks about live yeast cultures at a New York University lab in the Alexandria Center for Life Sciences in New York, where researchers are attempting to create completely man-made, custom-built DNA. The yeast genome is like a chain with 12 million chemical links, known by the letters, A, C, T and G. That’s less than one-hundredth the size of the human genome, which has 3.2 billion links. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
July 26, 2017 - 7:26 am
NEW YORK (AP) — At Jef Boeke's lab, you can whiff an odor that seems out of place, as if they were baking bread here. But he and his colleagues are cooking up something else altogether: yeast that works with chunks of man-made DNA. Scientists have long been able to make specific changes in the DNA...
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This Tuesday, April 25, 2017 photo shows a a petri dish containing live yeast cultures at a New York University labe at the Alexandria Center for Life Sciences in New York, where researchers are attempting to create completely man-made, custom-built DNA. The work may reveal basic, hidden rules that govern the structure and functioning of genomes. But it also opens the door to life with new and useful characteristics. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
July 26, 2017 - 1:10 am
NEW YORK (AP) — At Jef Boeke's lab, you can whiff an odor that seems out of place, as if they were baking bread here. But he and his colleagues are cooking up something else altogether: yeast that works with chunks of man-made DNA. Scientists have long been able to make specific changes in the DNA...
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FILE - In a Friday, Nov. 14, 2014 file photo, Elsa, a kitten, recovers at the Denver Dumb Friends League animal shelter, in Denver. A DNA study reached back thousands of years to track the spread domesticated cats through the ancient human world and found evidence of two major dispersals from the Middle East, in which people evidently took cats with them. Genetic signatures the felines had on those journeys are still seen in most modern-day breeds. (AP Photo/P. Solomon Banda)
June 20, 2017 - 7:11 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Long before cats became the darlings of Facebook and YouTube, they spread through the ancient human world. A DNA study reached back thousands of years to track that conquest and found evidence of two major dispersals from the Middle East, in which people evidently took cats with...
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