Biology

Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 1:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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FILE- In this Aug. 6, 2018, file photo, a dead Snook lies dead due to red tide in Bradenton Beach, Fla. Florida is creating a public-private partnership to research how to control and alleviate red tide blooms. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis signed a bill Thursday, June 20, 2019, that establishes a partnership between the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Mote Marine Laboratory to research the blooms that have killed wildlife, caused respiratory problems and hurt tourism.(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
June 20, 2019 - 5:24 pm
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida's governor signed a bill Thursday directing the state to work with a private marine institute to study and combat the red tide blooms that have hurt the state's vital tourism industry and killed such wildlife as manatees, fish and dolphins. Republican Gov. Ron...
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FILE - In this image provided by NASA, astronaut Buzz Aldrin poses for a photograph beside the U.S. flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. A new poll shows most Americans prefer focusing on potential asteroid impacts over a return to the moon. The survey by The Associated Press and the NORC Center for Public Affairs Research was released Thursday, June 20, one month before the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong and Aldrin’s momentous lunar landing. (Neil A. Armstrong/NASA via AP)
June 20, 2019 - 12:30 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Americans prefer a space program that focuses on potential asteroid impacts, scientific research and using robots to explore the cosmos over sending humans back to the moon or on to Mars, a poll shows. The poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2017, file photo, provided by NOAA Fisheries a North Pacific right whale swims in the Bering Sea west of Bristol Bay. Federal scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration have recorded singing by a rare right whale for the first time. Researchers used moored acoustic recorders to capture patterned calls made by male North Pacific right whales. Researchers detected four distinct songs over eight years at five locations in the southeast Bering Sea. (NOAA Fisheries via AP, File)
June 19, 2019 - 7:45 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — It's not America's Top 40, but it's a cutting edge song. Federal marine biologists for the first time have recorded singing by one of the rarest whales on the planet, the North Pacific right whale. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration researchers used moored...
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FILE - In this May, 22, 2019, file photo, a woman walks with her dogs at Newcomb Hollow Beach, where a boogie boarder was bitten by a shark in 2018 and later died of his injuries, in Wellfleet, Mass. Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following two attacks on humans in 2018, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
June 19, 2019 - 6:10 am
BOSTON (AP) — Researchers on Cape Cod are launching a new study focused on the hunting and feeding habits of the region's great white sharks following last year's two attacks on humans, including the state's first fatal one in more than 80 years. The hope is that the work, which starts in the...
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In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mexican gray wolf interagency field team shows Mexican gray wolf pups that are part of a cross-fostering program in which pups born in captivity are placed with packs in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. (The Interagency Field Team/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
June 18, 2019 - 6:47 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines — from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos and special conservation centers around the U.S. It's also about timing as wolves...
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FILE - This Feb. 18, 2014 shows Lexy, a therapy dog at Fort Bragg, N.C. A study released on Monday, June 17, 2019 suggests that over thousands of years of dog domestication, people preferred dogs that could pull off the ”puppy dog" eyes look. And that encouraged the evolution of the facial muscle behind it, researchers propose. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz, File)
June 17, 2019 - 3:17 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — What's behind those hard-to-resist puppy dog eyes? New research suggests that over thousands of years of dog domestication, people preferred pups that could pull off that appealing, sad look. And that encouraged the development of the facial muscle that creates it. Today, pooches...
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FILE - In this May 6, 2019 file photo, Duat Mai stands atop a dead whale at Ocean Beach in San Francisco. Federal officials are asking waterfront landowners in western Washington to volunteer their properties to be the final resting place for dead gray whales. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries says so many gray whale carcasses have washed up this year they've run out of locations where they can be left to decompose. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
June 16, 2019 - 2:03 am
PORT HADLOCK, Wash. (AP) — At least one Washington state waterfront landowner has said yes to a request to allow dead gray whales to decompose on their property. So many gray whale carcasses have washed up this year that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries says it has run...
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In this Thursday, May 23, 2019, photo, officials of the Department of Marine and Coastal Resources feed milk to Marium, a baby dugong separated from her mother, on Libong island, Trang province, southern Thailand. The estimated 5-month-old female dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. (Sirachai Arunrugstichai via AP)
June 14, 2019 - 8:09 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A baby dugong that has developed an attachment to humans after being separated from its mother and getting lost in the ocean off southern Thailand is being nurtured by marine experts in hopes that it can one day fend for itself. The estimated 5-month-old female dugong named Marium...
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In this March 15, 2019 photo, Brian Jetter poses for a portrait in La Jolla, Calif. In 2018 at 40, he was suddenly battling pneumonia and sepsis, and a slew of tests had failed to find the cause. But a high-tech genetic test was used to search his blood for bits of non-human genetic material from viruses, fungi and the like. It detected unusual bacteria that probably got into the Connecticut man's lungs when he choked and accidentally inhaled bits of a burger weeks earlier. (AP Photo/Marilynn Marchione)
June 12, 2019 - 5:03 pm
Brian Jetter was on life support, a healthy 40-year-old suddenly battling pneumonia and sepsis, and a slew of tests had failed to find the cause. Mystery illnesses like this kill thousands of people each year when germs can't be identified fast enough to reveal the right treatment. Now genetic...
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