Biotechnology

March 13, 2018 - 9:44 am
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A $1.5 billion settlement was reached in a class-action lawsuit covering tens of thousands of farmers, grain-handling facilities and ethanol plants that sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed. Lawsuits in state and...
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March 12, 2018 - 8:50 pm
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A $1.5 billion settlement was reached Monday in a class-action lawsuit covering tens of thousands of farmers, grain-handling facilities and ethanol plants that sued Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta over its introduction of a genetically engineered corn seed. Lawsuits in...
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March 06, 2018 - 6:39 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Ian Haydon, University of Washington (THE CONVERSATION) Mary Shelley was 20 when she published “Frankenstein” in 1818. Two hundred years on, the book remains thrilling, challenging and...
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In this Jan. 26, 2018 photo, Matt Chappell, right, is checked by Dr. Christopher Schiessl during an appointment at a medical center in San Francisco. For more than a decade, the strongest AIDS drugs could not fully control Chappell's HIV infection. Now his body does it by itself, thanks to the first gene editing experiments in people. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
February 13, 2018 - 1:27 am
For more than a decade, the strongest AIDS drugs could not fully control Matt Chappell's HIV infection. Now his body controls it by itself, and researchers are trying to perfect the gene editing that made this possible. Scientists removed some of his blood cells, disabled a gene to help them resist...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 13, 2017 file photo, Brian Madeux, starts to receive the first human gene editing therapy for Hunter syndrome, as his girlfriend Marcie Humphrey, left, applauds at the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in Oakland, Calif. At right is nurse practitioner Jacqueline Madden. Gene editing aims to permanently change someone's DNA to try to cure a disease. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
February 06, 2018 - 7:33 pm
A second patient has been treated in a historic gene editing study in California, and no major side effects or safety issues have emerged from the first man's treatment nearly three months ago, doctors revealed Tuesday. Gene editing is a more precise way to do gene therapy, and aims to permanently...
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In this undated photo provided by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, cloned monkeys Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua sit together with a fabric toy. For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create two healthy monkeys, potentially bringing scientists closer to being able to do that with humans. (Sun Qiang and Poo Muming/Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
January 25, 2018 - 9:45 am
NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, researchers have used the cloning technique that produced Dolly the sheep to create healthy monkeys, bringing science an important step closer to being able to do the same with humans. Since Dolly's birth in 1996, scientists have cloned nearly two dozen kinds of...
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In this undated photo provided by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, cloned monkeys Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua sit together with a fabric toy. For the first time, researchers have used the cloning method that produced Dolly the sheep to create two healthy monkeys, potentially bringing scientists closer to being able to do that with humans. (Sun Qiang and Poo Muming/Chinese Academy of Sciences via AP)
January 24, 2018 - 4:50 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, researchers have used the cloning technique that produced Dolly the sheep to create healthy monkeys, bringing science an important step closer to being able to do the same with humans. Since Dolly's birth in 1996, scientists have cloned nearly two dozen kinds of...
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FILE - In this Oct. 4, 2017, file photo, Dr. Albert Maguire, right, checks the eyes of Misa Kaabali, 8, at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Misa was 4-years-old when he received his gene therapy treatment. The first-of-its kind genetic treatment for blindness will cost $850,000, less than the $1 million price tag that had been expected, but it's still among the most expensive genetic therapies in the world. Spark Therapeutics said it decided on the lower price tag for Luxturna, after hearing from health insurers about their ability to cover the injectable treatment. (AP Photo/Bill West, File)
December 19, 2017 - 1:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials on Tuesday approved the nation's first gene therapy for an inherited disease, a treatment that improves the sight of patients with a rare form of blindness. It marks another major advance for the emerging field of genetic medicine. The approval for Spark...
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November 20, 2017 - 9:28 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Deepak Kumar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Stephen P. Long, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Vijay Singh, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (THE...
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CORRECTS NAME OF DISEASE TO HUNTER SYNDROME FROM NPS - In this photo taken Monday Nov. 6, 2017, Brian Madeux, 44, makes his way through the UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital in preparation for the first human gene editing therapy in Oakland, Calif. Madeux, who has Hunter syndrome, received the treatment on Monday, Nov. 13. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
November 15, 2017 - 10:19 am
OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person's DNA to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a...
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