Biotechnology

In this image provided by Nationwide Children's Hospital, Dr. Jerry Mendell of the Center for Gene Therapy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. Mendell led a small study of gene therapy in babies born with a usually fatal neuromuscular disease and reported Nov. 1, 2017, that the experiment extended the tots’ survival, and some could roll over or sit up. (Barb Consiglio/Nationwide Children's Hospital via AP)
November 01, 2017 - 5:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A first attempt at gene therapy for a disease that leaves babies unable to move, swallow and, eventually, breathe has extended the tots' lives, and some began to roll over, sit and stand on their own, researchers reported Wednesday. Only 15 babies with spinal muscular atrophy...
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October 10, 2017 - 4:51 pm
In a story Oct. 9 about an experimental gene therapy for blindness, The Associated Press erroneously reported the deadline for a decision by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The date is Jan. 12, not Jan. 18. A corrected version of the story is below: Seeing hope: FDA panel considers gene...
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In this Monday, Oct. 2, 2017, photo, Beth Guardino, left, and her son, Christian, talk about the 17-year-old's life before and after gene therapy treatment for his hereditary blindness during an interview at their home in Patchogue, N.Y. Christian was diagnosed with hereditary blindness and received gene therapy as part of a study. On Thursday, Oct. 12, U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisers will consider whether to recommend approval of the gene therapy. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)
October 09, 2017 - 10:47 pm
A girl saw her mother's face for the first time. A boy tore through the aisles of Target, marveling at toys he never knew existed. A teen walked onto a stage and watched the stunned expressions of celebrity judges as he wowed "America's Got Talent." Caroline, Cole, Christian. All had mere glimmers...
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October 04, 2017 - 3:34 pm
MIAMI (AP) — U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials say genetically modified mosquitoes are not "drugs" and should be regulated by environmental authorities. According to guidelines posted online Wednesday, federal officials have decided that mosquitoes engineered by the biotech firm Oxitec...
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FILE- This April 18, 2017, file photo shows the suburban Minneapolis headquarters of Syngenta in Minnetonka, Minn. Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta said Tuesday, Sept. 26, that it has agreed to settle tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits by farmers over the company's rollout of a genetically engineered corn seed variety before China approved it for imports. Terms weren't disclosed. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
September 26, 2017 - 6:40 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta said Tuesday it has agreed to settle tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits by farmers over the company's rollout of a genetically engineered corn seed variety before China approved it for imports. Terms weren't disclosed. Syngenta said in a...
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September 26, 2017 - 2:29 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta said Tuesday it has agreed to settle tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits by farmers over the company's rollout of a genetically engineered corn seed variety before China approved it for imports. Terms weren't disclosed. Syngenta said in a...
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September 13, 2017 - 11:37 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union court ruled Wednesday in favor of an Italian activist farmer who has defied his nation's laws by planting genetically modified corn. Italy has prosecuted Giorgio Fidenato for cultivating the corn on his land, citing concerns the crops could endanger human health...
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This photo provided by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, taken in May 2017, shows Emily Whitehead five years after she became the first pediatric patient in the world to receive an experimental therapy at the hospital that has put her leukemia into long-term remission. Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia via AP)
August 30, 2017 - 12:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. The CAR-T cell treatment developed by Novartis...
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This photo provided by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, taken in May 2017, shows Emily Whitehead five years after she became the first pediatric patient in the world to receive an experimental therapy at the hospital that has put her leukemia into long-term remission. Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia via AP)
August 30, 2017 - 12:44 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. The CAR-T cell treatment developed by Novartis...
Read More
This photo provided by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, taken in May 2017, shows Emily Whitehead five years after she became the first pediatric patient in the world to receive an experimental therapy at the hospital that has put her leukemia into long-term remission. Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia via AP)
August 30, 2017 - 11:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening a new era in cancer care, the Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved the first treatment that genetically engineers patients' own blood cells into an army of assassins to seek and destroy childhood leukemia. The CAR-T cell treatment developed by Novartis and...
Read More

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