Birds

Gov. Rick Scott, R-Fla., right, looks on as President Donald Trump talks with reporters after arriving at Eglin Air Force Base to visit areas affected by Hurricane Michael, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018, in Eglin Air Force Base, Fla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
October 15, 2018 - 2:15 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump got a bird's-eye view Monday of Florida communities left in ruins by Hurricane Michael, including houses without roofs, a toppled water tower and 18-wheel trucks scattered in a parking lot during a nearly hour-long helicopter tour of portions of the...
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August 19, 2018 - 6:07 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Climate change could be to blame for the collapse of bird populations in the desert along the Nevada-California border, scientists said. The number of bird species has fallen by an average of 43 percent over the past century at survey sites across an area larger than New York state...
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In this image made from video provided by NASA, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev flings a Sirius nano-satellite into orbit from the International Space Station on Wednesday, Aug. 15, 2018. (NASA via AP)
August 15, 2018 - 8:18 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Spacewalking cosmonauts set up an antenna for tracking birds on Earth and sent a series of tiny satellites flying from the International Space Station on Wednesday. Russian Sergey Prokopyev used his gloved right hand to fling four research satellites into space. The...
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FILE - In this April 20, 2013 file photo, male greater sage grouse perform mating rituals for a female grouse, not pictured, on a lake outside Walden, Colo. Some Western governors say a new Trump administration directive threatens to undermine a hard-won compromise aimed at saving a beleaguered bird scattered across their region. The directive, issued in late July 2018, severely limits a type of land swap involving federal property. Critics say that eliminates an important tool for saving habitat for the shrinking population of greater sage grouse. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
August 13, 2018 - 3:30 pm
DENVER (AP) — Some governors in the U.S. West say a new Trump administration directive threatens to undermine a hard-won compromise aimed at saving a beleaguered bird scattered across their region. The directive, issued in late July, severely limits a type of land swap involving federal property...
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FILE - In this July 5, 2018, file photo, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks at an event in the Brownsville section of Brooklyn in New York. At an event in the Adirondacks, Cuomo recounted a treasured memory of the time his family retrieved an eagle feather from Saranac Lake and kept it after one of the beautiful birds swooped near his canoe. In telling the story, the New York Democrat was unknowingly confessing a crime. A federal law prohibits non-Native Americans from possessing bald eagle parts, including feathers. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
August 12, 2018 - 12:47 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — At an event in the Adirondacks last week, Gov. Andrew Cuomo recounted a treasured memory of the time his family retrieved an eagle feather from Saranac Lake and kept it after one of the beautiful birds swooped near his canoe. In telling the story , the New York Democrat was...
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August 12, 2018 - 11:05 am
BRIGHTWATERS, N.Y. (AP) — Residents of a Long Island village are divided over what to do about a glut of goose droppings around town. Brightwaters Mayor John Valdini tells Newsday in a story published Sunday that the village has gotten about a dozen complaints about its Canada goose population in...
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An Andean flamingo swaddles a surrogate Chilean flamingo chick, supplanted to replace its own infertile egg, in Slimbridge, England, in this undated photo. The British conservation charity Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust says recent record-breaking high temperatures encouraged a rare flock of Andean flamingos to lay eggs for the first time since 2003, but their eggs were infertile so the WWT gave them eggs from their near relatives, Chilean flamingos, to look after and satisfy their nurturing instincts. (Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust via AP)
August 12, 2018 - 2:38 am
LONDON (AP) — A British conservation charity says record-breaking temperatures have encouraged a rare flock of Andean flamingos to lay eggs for the first time since 2003. The Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust says six of the exotic birds laid nine eggs, all of which were infertile. The charity's...
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Visitors at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo were evacuated to Cheyenne Mountain High School and waited to be picked up after a powerful hailstorm storm hit the zoo Monday, Aug. 6, 2018, in Colorado Springs, Colo. Brandon Sneide, left, and his family were caught in the gift shop at the zoo. His son, Gabriel Sneide, clutches a stuffed animal from the zoo while he hugs his brother, Maximus Sneide. Savannah Sneide gets a hug from Sneide's girlfriend, Rebecca Andrews, while they wait for a ride. (Jerilee Bennett/The Gazette via AP)
August 07, 2018 - 5:56 pm
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — A Colorado zoo was cleaning up Tuesday after a hail storm that killed two birds and sent five people to the hospital. Hail between about 3 to 4 inches (7.6 and 10.1 centimeters) — between the size of baseballs and softballs — smashed the skylights of several buildings...
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FILE - In this Feb. 21, 2012, file photo, parrots stop for some seed and an apple at the home of Joe Sulley in Brisbane, Calif. San Francisco's famous birds immortalized in the book and movie "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" are now roosting in several neighborhoods throughout the city, a newspaper reported Saturday, Aug. 4, 2018. They can be seen flying in formation in small flocks throughout the city now and have been sighted as far south as Brisbane, about 15 miles south of the city. (Brant Ward /San Francisco Chronicle via AP, File)
August 04, 2018 - 7:12 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco's famous birds immortalized in the book and movie "The Wild Parrots of Telegraph Hill" are now roosting in several neighborhoods throughout the city, a newspaper reported Saturday. The parrots are roosting in other neighborhoods beyond their original home on the...
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This photo provided by Jessica McLachlan shows a fairy-wren. Scientists have discovered that birds can learn to recognize alarm calls of other species, essentially by learning to eavesdrop in a second language. The Australian songbird called the fairy wren isn’t born knowing other birds’ chirps, but it can learn to recognize a few “words.” In a paper published Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, in the journal Current Biology, scientists explained how they taught the birds the distress calls of other species.(Jessica McLachlan via AP)
August 02, 2018 - 7:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For birds, understanding neighborhood gossip about an approaching hawk or brown snake can mean the difference between life or death. Wild critters are known to listen to each other for clues about lurking predators, effectively eavesdropping on other species' chatter. Birds, for...
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