Censorship

FILE - In this Tuesday, May 14, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. The White House has launched an online survey asking people to share their experiences if they think political bias has led to their posts being removed from social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. The White House’s official Twitter account tweeted a link to the survey, saying that "The Trump Administration is fighting for free speech online." (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 15, 2019 - 7:54 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — On the heels of President Donald Trump's repeated assertions claiming anti-conservative bias by tech companies, the White House has launched an online form asking people to share their experiences if they think political partisanship has led them being silenced by social media...
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FILE - In this file photo taken May 22, 2014, Liu Qiangdong, also known as Richard Liu, CEO of JD.com, raises his arms to celebrate the IPO for his company at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York. Six Chinese social media accounts have been shut down after advocating support for a woman who has accused JD.com founder Richard Liu of rape. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
May 03, 2019 - 6:32 am
BEIJING (AP) — For three years, Chen Chun published articles on his public WeChat account touching on politics, philosophy and current affairs — subjects that are often censored on Chinese social media. More recently, the writer in southern China has focused on the country's growing #MeToo movement...
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Venezuela's self-proclaimed president Juan Guaido gives a thumbs up amid supporters in Altamira Plaza in Caracas, Venezuela, Tuesday, April 30, 2019. Guaido took to the streets with a small contingent of heavily armed troops early Tuesday in a bold and risky call for the military to rise up and oust President Nicolas Maduro. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
April 30, 2019 - 8:52 pm
CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — The latest on the political crisis in Venezuela (all times local): 8:50 p.m. Venezuela opposition leader Juan Guaido is urging people to take to the streets for new mass protests Wednesday. In a video statement posted on social media Tuesday night, Guaido also urged the...
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Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks at a business breakfast in Darwin, Wednesday, April 24, 2019. Morrison and his political rival, Bill Shorten, say they are not tailoring their political messages to suit Chinese censors as the politicians increasingly use Chinese social media to woo Chinese-speaking voters. (Mick Tsikas/AAP Image via AP)
April 24, 2019 - 3:54 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's prime minister and his political rival said on Wednesday they were not tailoring their political messages to suit Chinese censors as the politicians increasingly use Chinese social media to woo Chinese-speaking voters. Prime Minister Scott Morrison and...
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April 22, 2019 - 1:51 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tech workers in China protesting a corporate culture of grueling work schedules are getting some support from their U.S. peers. A fast-growing campaign started by Chinese software developers on the code-sharing platform GitHub has contributed to a public debate over work-life...
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A man walks past an ads poster at an Internet devices shop in St.Petersburg, Russia, Thursday, April 11, 2019. Russian lawmakers approved Thursday a bill that would expand government control over the internet and whose opponents fear heralds a new era of widespread censorship. The bill would install equipment to route Russian internet traffic through servers in the country. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)
April 16, 2019 - 4:49 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's lower chamber of parliament has adopted a bill that would expand government control over the internet, raising fears of widespread censorship. The State Duma on Tuesday overwhelmingly voted to support the bill, which still has to be approved by the upper chamber of Russian...
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People are silhouetted as they walk along an avenue past an old Orthodox church in the background in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, April 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
April 11, 2019 - 6:35 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian lawmakers approved Thursday a bill that would expand government control over the internet and whose opponents fear heralds a new era of widespread censorship. The bill would install equipment to route Russian internet traffic through servers in the country. That would increase...
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Australia's Attorney-General Christian Porter, left, and Minister for Communications Mitch Fifield hold a press conference at Parliament House, in Canberra, Wednesday, April 4, 2019. Australia's Parliament passed legislation that could imprison social media executives if their platforms stream violent images such as the New Zealand mosque shootings. (Mick Tsikas/AAP Image via AP)
April 04, 2019 - 3:24 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's Parliament passed legislation on Thursday that could imprison social media executives if their platforms stream real violence such as the New Zealand mosque shootings. Critics warn that some of the most restrictive laws about online communication in the...
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A customer looks at a movie poster for the film "Bohemian Rhapsody" at a movie theater in Beijing, Wednesday, March 27, 2019. Moviegoers in China say the version of the "Bohemian Rhapsody" shown in Chinese theaters erases mentions of Freddie Mercury's sexuality. The biopic on the lead singer of the British rock band Queen omitted a same-sex kiss and lacked scenes in which Mercury reveals he's not straight and has AIDS. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
March 27, 2019 - 6:27 am
BEIJING (AP) — A huge fan of rock legends Queen, Peng Yanzi rushed to see "Bohemian Rhapsody," the biopic about the band's late lead singer, Freddie Mercury, while he was traveling in Britain last October. It was a touching film that made him cry hard, Peng says. He loved it enough to watch it a...
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FILE - In this Feb. 26, 2019, file photo, Cardinal George Pell arrives at the County Court in Melbourne, Australia. High-profile Australian journalists face possible prison sentences, and large media organizations could face fines after being ordered to appear in court next month for allegedly breaching a gag order on reporting about Pell's convictions on charges of sexually molesting two choirboys. (AP Photo/Andy Brownbill, File)
March 26, 2019 - 11:13 pm
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Some of Australia's highest-profile journalists face possible prison sentences and large media organizations could be fined after being ordered to appear in court next month for allegedly breaching a gag order on reporting about Cardinal George Pell's convictions on...
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