Climate change

June 04, 2017 - 12:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The mayor of the District of Columbia says she'll continue to follow the guidelines of the Paris climate change accord despite President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the pact. In a statement, the city says that on Monday, Mayor Muriel Bowser will sign...
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June 03, 2017 - 3:04 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — A United Nations agency said Saturday it had "serious concern" about coral bleaching on Australia's Great Barrier and urged the government to work faster to improve water quality in the region. UNESCO said in a draft report to the World Heritage Committee released in...
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U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, right, sits with Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong as they attend the opening dinner of the 16th International Institute for Strategic Studies Shangri-la Dialogue, or IISS, Asia Security Summit on Friday, June 2, 2017 in Singapore. (AP Photo/Joseph Nair)
June 02, 2017 - 9:22 pm
SINGAPORE (AP) — North Korea is accelerating its push to acquire a nuclear-armed missile capable of threatening the United States and other nations, and the U.S. regards this as a "clear and present danger," U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Saturday. Speaking at an international security...
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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt points as he answers questions from members of the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, June 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
June 02, 2017 - 7:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Does he or doesn't he? Believe in climate change, that is. You'd think that would be an easy enough question the day after President Donald Trump announced he was pulling the U.S. out of the landmark global accord aimed at combatting global warming. But don't bother asking at the...
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EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt points as he answers questions from members of the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, June 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
June 02, 2017 - 5:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Does he or doesn't he? Believe in climate change, that is. You'd think that would be an easy enough question the day after President Donald Trump announced he was pulling the U.S. out of the landmark global accord aimed at combatting global warming. But don't bother asking at the...
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In this May 31, 2017, photo a Gateway Clipper ship approaches the Point as it passes in front of the Pittsburgh downtown skyline. President Donald Trump framed his decision to leave the Paris climate accord during a news conference on Thursday, June 1 as "a reassertion of America's sovereignty," he said, "I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris." (Darrell Sapp/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)
June 02, 2017 - 5:18 pm
PITTSBURGH (AP) — In announcing plans to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord, President Donald Trump declared that he was "elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris." But the Steel City is hardly in Trump's corner on this one. At City Hall and on the streets, Pittsburgh...
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Secretary of State Rex Tillerson answers a question from the media about the U.S. leaving the Paris climate accord, while meeting with Brazilian Foreign Minister Aloysio Nunes Ferreira, Friday, June 2, 2017, at the State Department in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
June 02, 2017 - 4:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump announced America's withdrawal from a global climate change pact, infuriating allies far and wide, the man charged with defending the decision to the world kept his distance. Having quietly lobbied Trump to stay in the pact, Secretary of State Rex...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Nov. 17, 2016, file photo, Ron Cogan, editor and publisher of the Green Car Journal, right, and Steve Majoros, director of Chevrolet Marketing, pose together after the 2017 Chevrolet Bolt EV was announced the winner of the Green Car of the Year Award during the Los Angeles Auto Show in Los Angeles. President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord may have only limited immediate impact on many U.S. companies, according to analysts. Some corporations that had supported the Paris agreement were quick to signal that Trump’s decision would not change their plans. “Our position on climate change has not changed ... we publicly advocate for climate action,” said General Motors. The company said it would stand by its support for various climate pledges, and it boasted about its Chevrolet Bolt EV, an electric vehicle priced under $30,000. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson, File)
June 02, 2017 - 3:19 pm
DALLAS (AP) — President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate accord may have only limited immediate impact on many U.S. companies, according to analysts. In part that is because the Paris agreement only went into effect last year, it's voluntary, and doesn't...
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Smoke from "Mittal Steel" factory rising in the air in Bosnian town of Zenica, Bosnia, on Friday, June, 2, 2017. Environmental activists in Bosnia, one of the poorest European countries suffering from some of the world’s highest levels of air pollution, are disappointed and concerned over the decision by President Donald Trump to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord. (AP Photo/Almir Alic)
June 02, 2017 - 1:44 pm
PARIS (AP) — A Malian cattle herder, German environmental activists, leaders from Mexico to China — they're among millions on Friday denouncing President Donald Trump's decision to pull the United States out of the Paris climate accord. Many nations pledged to ramp up their efforts to curb global...
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President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
June 02, 2017 - 1:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's supporters on Friday cast his decision to abandon the world's climate change pact as a "refreshing" stance for the U.S. that would save jobs and unburden industry. In a fierce rejoinder from across the globe, leaders of other nations and scientists pointed...
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