Coffee and tea manufacturing

Seen in this 2017 photo, Drew Wynne who quit his job in 2016 to pursue a career manufacturing cold-brew coffee died in October 2017 after using a paint stripper at the business in Charleston, S.C. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt had put on hold the Obama administration’s attempt to ban consumer sales of paint strippers containing the compound methylene chloride. But he reversed course in May after meeting with families of men who died after using paint stripper. Brian Wynne, brother of Drew, believes, methylene chloride may already have been out of stores by fall 2017, when his brother was found dead at the business, killed by methylene chloride, according to coroners. (Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier via AP)
July 06, 2018 - 1:32 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — For 37 mostly female farm-workers in California's Central Valley, U.S. policy under Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt became personal not long after sunup one day in May 2017. Picking cabbage that morning, the workers noticed a tarry smell drifting from a nearby...
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Seen in this 2017 photo, Drew Wynne who quit his job in 2016 to pursue a career manufacturing cold-brew coffee died in October 2017 after using a paint stripper at the business in Charleston, S.C. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt had put on hold the Obama administration’s attempt to ban consumer sales of paint strippers containing the compound methylene chloride. But he reversed course in May after meeting with families of men who died after using paint stripper. Brian Wynne, brother of Drew, believes, methylene chloride may already have been out of stores by fall 2017, when his brother was found dead at the business, killed by methylene chloride, according to coroners. (Brad Nettles/The Post and Courier via AP)
July 05, 2018 - 6:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — For 37 mostly female farm-workers in California's Central Valley, U.S. policy under Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt became personal not long after sunup one day in May 2017. Picking cabbage that morning, the workers noticed a tarry smell drifting from a nearby...
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FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2017, file photo, a barista pours steamed milk into a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles. State health officials proposed a regulation change Friday, June 15, 2018, that would declare coffee doesn't present a significant cancer risk, countering a recent California state court ruling that had shaken up some coffee drinkers. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
June 16, 2018 - 1:28 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — California officials, having concluded coffee drinking is not a risky pastime, are proposing a regulation that will essentially tell consumers of America's favorite beverage they can drink up without fear. The unprecedented action Friday by the Office of Environmental Health...
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FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2017, file photo, a barista pours steamed milk into a cup of coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles. State health officials proposed a regulation change Friday, June 15, 2018, that would declare coffee doesn't present a significant cancer risk, countering a recent California state court ruling that had shaken up some coffee drinkers. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
June 15, 2018 - 8:36 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — California officials bucked a recent court ruling Friday and offered reassurance to concerned coffee drinkers that their fix won't give them cancer. The unprecedented action by the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to propose a regulation to essentially clear...
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FILE - In this March 23, 2016, file photo, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz walks in front of a photo of Starbucks baristas, at the coffee company's annual shareholders meeting in Seattle. Starbucks Corp. says Schultz is stepping down executive chairman later this month. Schultz, who oversaw the transformation of Starbucks into a global chain with more than 28,000 locations, had retired as CEO last year to focus on innovation and social impact projects as executive chairman. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
June 04, 2018 - 6:13 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Starbucks Corp.'s Howard Schultz is stepping down as executive chairman of the coffee company he helped transform into a global brand, and says public service may be in his future. Schultz, 64, says he is considering many possibilities. He had endorsed Democratic presidential...
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May 08, 2018 - 8:38 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a story May 7 about a court ruling that will require cancer warnings on coffee sold in California, The Associated Press erroneously reported some details about the chemical acrylamide. As part of a court settlement, potato chip makers agreed to reduce the chemical from their...
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FILE - In this April 7, 2016, file photo Nestle's directors speak in front of the Nestle's logo during the general meeting of Nestle Group, in Lausanne, Switzerland. Nestle has entered an agreement to bring Starbucks products to millions of homes worldwide, announced Monday, May 7, 2018. (Laurent Gillieron/Keystone via AP, File)
May 07, 2018 - 12:17 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Nestle is paying more than $7 billion to buy the rights to sell Starbucks coffee and tea in supermarkets and other stores outside its coffee shops. The deal comes with a huge price tag for Nestle, but it could pay off big for the Swiss company. Its Nescafe and Nespresso don't carry...
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April 03, 2018 - 4:29 pm
In a story March 30 about coffee and cancer risks, The Associated Press misspelled the name of a University of Wisconsin-Madison health expert. She is Amy Trentham-Dietz, not Trenton-Dietz. A corrected version of the story is below: Science Says: What we know about cancer risk and coffee Trouble is...
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Adam Lange pours water while making coffee at a Philz Coffee shop in San Francisco, Friday, March 30, 2018. Coffee sellers will have to post ominous warnings in California because each cup contains a chemical linked to cancer, a judge ruled. The culprit is a byproduct of the bean roasting process that is a known carcinogen and has been at the heart of an eight-year legal struggle between a tiny nonprofit group and Big Coffee companies. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
March 30, 2018 - 7:15 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — It's fair to say that a lot of people awoke Friday to a headline that might have jolted them more awake than a morning cup of joe: A California judge had ruled that coffee sold in the state should carry a cancer warning. Here are some things to know about the ruling and how it...
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FILE - In this Sept. 22, 2017, file photo, a barista pours steamed milk in a coffee at a cafe in Los Angeles. Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle has ruled that California law requires coffee companies to carry an ominous cancer warning label because of a chemical produced in the roasting process. Judge Berle wrote in a proposed ruling Wednesday, March 28, 2018, that Starbucks and other coffee companies failed to show that the threat from a chemical compound produced in the roasting process was insignificant. At the center of the dispute is acrylamide, a carcinogen found in many cooked foods, that is produced during the roasting process. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
March 30, 2018 - 1:47 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Coffee sellers will have to post ominous warnings in California because each cup contains a chemical linked to cancer, a judge ruled. The culprit is a byproduct of the bean roasting process that is a known carcinogen and has been at the heart of an eight-year legal struggle...
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