Conservation laws and regulations

A monarch butterfly is silhouetted suspended near its empty chrysalis soon after emerging in Washington, Sunday, June 2, 2019. Farming and other human development have eradicated state-size swaths of its native milkweed habitat, cutting the butterfly's numbers by 90% over the last two decades. It is now under considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
August 14, 2019 - 11:22 am
GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — Hand-raising monarch butterflies in the midst of a global extinction crisis, Laura Moore and her neighbors gather round in her suburban Maryland yard to launch a butterfly newly emerged from its chrysalis. Eager to play his part, 3-year-old Thomas Powell flaps his arms and...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Va. While once-endangered bald eagles are booming again in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall trajectory of endangered species and the federal act that protects them isn't so clearcut. (Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 6:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions . The action, which expands the administration's rewrite of...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo President Donald Trump listens as Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during an event on the environment in the East Room of the White House in Washington. The Trump administration has finalized changes to enforcement of the landmark Endangered Species Act, a move it says will improve transparency and effectiveness but critics say will drive more creatures to extinction. Bernhardt unveiled the changes Monday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
August 12, 2019 - 5:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's changes to the Endangered Species Act (all times local): 3:20 p.m. California and Massachusetts say they'll go to court to fight the Trump administration's overhaul of the Endangered Species Act. Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey...
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FILE - This April 10, 2014, file photo shows a male sage grouse trying to impress a group of hens, at left, near the base of the Rattlesnake Range in southwest Natrona County, Wyo. The U.S. Forest Service is changing sage grouse protection plans in five Western states it says will conserve habitat while allowing ranchers to maintain their livelihoods. The federal agency made the announcement Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, but details of the plans involving Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming and Colorado aren't being made public until Friday. (Alan Rogers/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP, File)
August 01, 2019 - 5:07 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Plans for protecting sage grouse in five Western states are being changed in ways that will conserve habitat while allowing ranchers to maintain their livelihoods, federal officials said Thursday. The U.S. Forest Service said the changes allow for greater flexibility and local...
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In this Tuesday, July 9, 2019 photo Northern Arizona University researcher Matt Johnson looks for tamarisk beetles along the Verde River in Clarkdale, Ariz. The beetles were brought to the U.S. from Asia to devour invasive tamarisk, or salt cedar, trees. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)
July 26, 2019 - 8:16 pm
CLARKDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves. He counts spiders, ants and leafhoppers among the catch and few...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo President Donald Trump listens as Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during an event on the environment in the East Room of the White House in Washington. A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit. U.S. Rep. Raúl Grijalva is leading an investigation into the proposed 28,000-home development. Bernhardt had an unofficial meeting when he was deputy secretary with developer Mike Ingram, Arizona Diamondbacks co-owner and a prominent GOP donor. Interior officials deny politics played a part in the permit. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 10, 2019 - 7:20 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit after a wildlife official said the housing project would threaten habitat for imperiled species. U.S. Rep. Raúl...
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FILE - This February 2017 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a wolf of the Wenaha Pack captured on a remote camera on U.S. Forest Service land in Oregon's northern Wallowa County. A federal proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list has divided states in the West, and has even exposed conflicting views among top officials in Oregon. The governor said Thursday, May 16, 2019, it's critically important that range-wide recovery efforts for wolves across the West be maintained. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File)
May 16, 2019 - 6:56 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The gray wolf is on track for a remarkable comeback after being almost exterminated in the contiguous United States, but a Trump administration proposal to take the iconic symbol of the wild off the endangered species list has exposed divisions among states. California says it...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2008, file photo, Manuel Lujan, Jr., a former US. representative from New Mexico and Secretary of the Interior, poses for a portrait at his home in Albuquerque, N.M. Lujan, a former Republican congressman from New Mexico who as U.S. Interior Secretary drew fire from environmentalists for challenging the Endangered Species Act has died. He was 90. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, a distant cousin, on Friday, April 26, 2019, announced Luján's death. (AP Photo/Toby Jorrin, File)
April 26, 2019 - 7:16 pm
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Manuel Luján Jr., who spent 20 years as a Republican congressman and later as a U.S. Interior Secretary who drew fire from environmentalists for challenging the Endangered Species Act, has died. He was 90. New Mexico Gov. Michelle Luján Grisham, who was a distant cousin,...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, March 20, 2018 file photo, giraffes and zebras congregate under the shade of a tree in the afternoon in Mikumi National Park, Tanzania. The Trump administration has taken a first step toward extending protections for giraffes under the Endangered Species Act, following legal pressure from environmental groups. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced Thursday that its initial review has determined there is “substantial information that listing may be warranted” for giraffes. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
April 25, 2019 - 12:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration took a first step Thursday toward extending protections for giraffes under the Endangered Species Act, following legal pressure from environmental groups. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced that its initial review has determined there is "...
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FILE - This May 31, 2018 file photo shows Hoover Dam that impounds Lake Mead on the Colorado River near Boulder City, Ariz. A plan to address a shrinking supply of water on a river that serves 40 million people in the U.S. West is headed to President Donald Trump. The U.S. House and Senate approved the Colorado River drought contingency plan on Monday, April 8, 2019. Seven western states spent years negotiating the drought plan. They aim to keep two key reservoirs from falling so low they cannot deliver water or produce hydropower. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
April 08, 2019 - 8:37 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A plan to address a shrinking supply of water on a river that serves 40 million people in the U.S. West is headed to President Donald Trump. The U.S. House and Senate approved the Colorado River drought contingency plan on Monday. Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico,...
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