Constitutional amendments

FILE - In this March 17, 2020 file photo, voters head to a polling station to vote in Florida's primary election in Orlando, Fla. Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday, Sept, 11. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave Florida felons the right to vote regardless of outstanding legal obligations, the order from the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals was a disappointment to voting rights activists and could have national implications in November’s presidential election. (AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
September 11, 2020 - 5:52 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida felons must pay all fines, restitution and legal fees before they can regain their right to vote, a federal appellate court ruled Friday in a case that could have broad implications for the November elections. Reversing a lower court judge's decision that gave...
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August 19, 2020 - 8:59 pm
CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic hit, state legislators scrambled to authorize relief programs, review emergency protocols and rebalance their budgets amid plummeting revenue projections. In California, they passed emergency measures to allow remote voting. In Arkansas, they...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2019, file photo, New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft points to fans as his team warms up before an NFL football game against the New York Jets, in East Rutherford, N.J. A Florida appeals court ruled Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2020, that police violated the rights of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and others when they secretly video recorded them paying for massage parlor sex acts, barring the tapes' use at trial and dealing a potentially deadly blow to their prosecution. (AP Photo/Bill Kostroun, File)
August 19, 2020 - 1:48 pm
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida appeals court ruled Wednesday that police violated the rights of New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and others when they secretly video recorded them paying for massage parlor sex acts, barring the tapes' use at trial and dealing a potentially deadly blow...
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In this 1920s photo, Alice Paul sews a suffrage flag in Washington. One hundred years ago, American women gained the guaranteed right to vote, with ratification of the 19th Amendment. But to suffragist Paul, the vote wasn't enough. She equipped herself with a law degree and got to work writing another constitutional amendment — one that would guarantee women equal rights under the law. (National Photo Company Collection/Library of Congress via AP)
August 17, 2020 - 2:30 pm
It was a huge step forward for American women when, exactly 100 years ago, they finally gained the guaranteed right to vote with ratification of the 19th Amendment. But to Alice Paul, the step wasn't nearly large enough. Paul, a suffragist who'd waged hunger strikes and endured forced feedings in...
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Pro-democracy students raise three-fingers, symbol of resistance salute, during a rally in Bangkok, Thailand, Sunday, Aug, 16, 2020. Protesters have stepped up pressure on the government if it failed to meet their demands, which include holding of new elections, amending the constitution, and an end to intimidation of critics. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)
August 16, 2020 - 12:34 pm
BANGKOK (AP) — Anti-government protesters gathered in large numbers in Thailand's capital on Sunday for a rally that suggested their movement's strength may extend beyond the college campuses where it had blossomed. Thousands of people assembled at Bangkok's Democracy Monument, a traditional venue...
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August 05, 2020 - 11:57 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said she will sign an executive order Wednesday granting convicted felons the right to vote, ending Iowa’s place as the only remaining state to broadly deny voting rights to felons. The Republican governor promised in June that she would take such...
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Irina, right, and Anastasia Lagutenko play with their son, Dorian, at a playground in St. Petersburg, Russia, July 2, 2020. Their 2017 wedding wasn’t legally recognized in Russia. Any hopes they could someday officially be married in their homeland vanished July 1 when voters approved a package of constitutional amendments, one of which stipulates that marriage in Russia is only between a man and a woman. (AP Photo)
July 13, 2020 - 2:29 am
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — At the Lagutenko wedding in 2017, the couple exchanged vows, rings and kisses in front of friends and relatives, then took a traditional drive in a limousine, stopping at landmarks for photos. But because they were both women, the wedding wasn’t legal in Russia. If...
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Honor guard members from the Mississippi National Guard practice folding the former Mississippi flag before a ceremony to retire the banner on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, inside the state Capitol in Jackson. The ceremony happened a day after Republican Gov. Tate Reeves signed a law that removed the flag's official status as a state symbol. The 126-year-old banner was the last state flag in the U.S. with the Confederate battle emblem. (AP Photo/Emily Wagster Pettus)
July 04, 2020 - 8:10 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi just ditched its Confederate-themed state flag. Later this year, the state's voters will decide whether to dump a statewide election process that dates to the Jim Crow era. Facing pressure from a lawsuit and the possibility of action from a federal judge,...
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Ella Pamfilova, head of Russian Central Election Commission, wearing a face mask and gloves to protect against coronavirus, center left, gestures while speaking at a news conference in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, July 2, 2020. Almost 78% of voters in Russia have approved amendments to the country's constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to stay in power until 2036, Russian election officials said Thursday after all the votes were counted. Kremlin critics said the vote was rigged. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)
July 02, 2020 - 11:49 am
MOSCOW (AP) — A vote that cleared the way for President Vladimir Putin to rule Russia until 2036 was denounced Thursday by his political opponents as a “Pyrrhic victory” that will only further erode his support and legitimacy. Putin himself thanked voters for their “support and trust,” and repeated...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin shows his passport to a member of an election commission as he arrives to take part in voting at a polling station in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, July 1, 2020. The vote on the constitutional amendments that would reset the clock on Russian President Vladimir Putin's tenure and enable him to serve two more six-year terms is set to wrap up Wednesday. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
July 01, 2020 - 4:54 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian voters approved changes to the constitution that will allow President Vladimir Putin to potentially hold power until 2036, but the weeklong plebiscite that concluded Wednesday was tarnished by widespread reports of pressure on voters and other irregularities. With three-...
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