Constitutions

President Donald Trump listens during a briefing about the coronavirus in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Wednesday, April 1, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
AP News
April 02, 2020 - 6:11 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is resisting calls to issue a national stay-at-home order to stem the spread of the new coronavirus despite his administration's projections that tens of thousands of Americans are likely to be killed by the disease. One by one, though, states are...
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Two runners get in their last legs of exercise before a Chicago police officer notifies them that the trails along Lake Michigan are closed in an effort to limit the spread of COVID-19 infections, Thursday, March 26, 2020, in Chicago. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
AP News
March 26, 2020 - 1:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has the biggest megaphone, but it's governors and local officials who will decide when to begin reopening their economies after shuttering them to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus. The Constitution largely gives states the authority to regulate...
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A traveler walks through the security line at the Salt Lake City International Airport Wednesday, March 25, 2020, in Salt Lake City. Many airline flights are nearly empty as virus undercuts travel. The Salt Lake City International Airport is expecting to screen about 5,000 passengers Wednesday, March 25, 2020, which is down from about 24,000 daily passengers. Earlier this year during the ski season, the airport was seeing record-breaking days with 30,000 passengers. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
AP News
March 26, 2020 - 12:21 am
CHICAGO (AP) — The orders seem prudent in the bid to thwart the spread of the novel coronavirus: Don't go out, don't gather with others and keep your stores closed. But growing segments of the U.S. population say state and federal governments are trampling on freedoms central to American life in...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin addresses Russian citizens on the State Television channels in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Putin has postponed a nationwide vote on proposed constitutional amendments that include a change that would allow him to seek another term in power. He also announced during a televised address to the nation that the government doesn't want Russians except those working in essential sectors to come to work next week. He said that stores, pharmacies and banks will stay open. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
March 25, 2020 - 1:09 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Citing the coronavirus, Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday postponed a nationwide vote on proposed constitutional amendments that include a change potentially allowing him to stay in office until 2036. Putin didn't set a new date for the plebiscite, which was originally...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin listens to Education Minister Sergei Kravtsov during their meeting in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, March 12, 2020. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
AP News
March 14, 2020 - 8:03 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a law on constitutional changes that could keep him in power for another 16 years, a step that must still be approved in a nationwide vote. Putin signed the measure on Saturday, the Kremlin said, three days after it sailed through the...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a session prior to voting for constitutional amendments at the State Duma, the Lower House of the Russian Parliament in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 10, 2020. Putin says he supports a proposed constitutional amendment that would allow him to seek another term and remain in power. Putin gave his support Tuesday to the amendment put forward by a lawmaker who as a Soviet cosmonaut became the first woman to fly to space.(Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
March 11, 2020 - 1:32 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian lawmakers on Wednesday rapidly rubber-stamped sweeping constitutional changes that could keep President Vladimir Putin in power until 2036. If Putin won and completed two more terms as president, it would make him the ruler of Russia for 36 years — longer than any other leader...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a session prior to voting for constitutional amendments at the State Duma, the Lower House of the Russian Parliament in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, March 10, 2020. Putin says he supports a proposed constitutional amendment that would allow him to seek another term and remain in power. Putin gave his support Tuesday to the amendment put forward by a lawmaker who as a Soviet cosmonaut became the first woman to fly to space.(Alexei Nikolsky, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
March 10, 2020 - 4:16 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin revealed his tightly guarded political plans Tuesday and supported a constitutional amendment that would allow him to seek reelection in 2024 by restarting the term count. The constitutional change would pave the way for the 67-year-old Putin to stay...
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FILE - In this Aug. 31, 2018 file photo, supporters of Missouri's redistricting ballot measure hold signs behind former state Sen. Bob Johnson as he serves as their spokesman during a press conference outside the Cole County Courthouse in Jefferson City, Mo. With the U.S. census approaching, some state lawmakers are attempting to alter voter-approved measures that were intended to reduce partisan gamesmanship when drawing new districts for the U.S. House and state legislatures. (AP Photo/David A. Lieb, File)
March 05, 2020 - 2:51 pm
When U.S census results are tallied each decade, it traditionally has been the task of state lawmakers and governors to redraw voting districts for seats in the U.S. House and state legislatures. But a growing number of states have shifted that job to special commissions or made other changes that...
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Anti-abortion lobbyists from left, Brittany Jones, of the Family Policy Alliance of Kansas; Jeannette Pryor, of the Kansas Catholic Conference, and Jeanne Gawdun, of Kansans for Life, confer outside the state Senate chamber ahead of a debate on a proposed constitutional amendment on abortion, Wednesday, Jan. 29. 2020, at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. The amendment would overturn a Kansas Supreme Court decision protecting abortion rights. (AP Photo/John Hanna)
February 28, 2020 - 11:34 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Abortion opponents who've become used to giving orders to Kansas lawmakers on the exact wording of new restrictions are stymied now that they face compromising to get a proposed anti-abortion amendment to the state constitution on the ballot. After falling short in a House vote...
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February 27, 2020 - 12:01 pm
A South Carolina law banning sex education teachers from mentioning any relationships other than heterosexual ones — unless the talk involves sexually transmitted diseases — is fueling a climate of state-sanctioned discrimination, a federal lawsuit says. The National Center for Lesbian Rights and...
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