Corporate news

In this photo released by Xinhua News Agency, workers labor at an assembly line for Dongfeng Passenger Vehicle Company in Wuhan, in central China's Hubei Province, March 24, 2020. While many migrant workers across China remain trapped by travel bans due to the coronavirus, some industrial production has returned to action, including in the crucial auto manufacturing industry, which is largely based in Wuhan, and in businesses that provide critical links in global supply chains. (Xiao Yijiu/Xinhua via AP)
March 25, 2020 - 7:12 pm
The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed as it continues to spread across the world. Here is a look at some of the latest developments Wednesday related to the global economy, particular economic sectors, and the workplace: HOUSING: Economists...
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A container and barriers block a backroad used by locals on the Netherlands border with Belgium between Chaam, southern Netherlands, and Meerle, northern Belgium, Monday, March 23, 2020. Both countries have come to a near standstill as their governments sought to prevent the further spread of coronavirus. For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
March 25, 2020 - 12:51 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union is taking unprecedented action to help member countries endure the massive economic shock of the virus outbreak, but some nations are resisting the idea of shared borrowing to cover the heavy costs - suggesting that even during this crisis there are limits to...
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March 25, 2020 - 8:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Orders to U.S. factories for big-ticket manufactured goods rose by a solid amount in February, but the gain came before the coronavirus had shut down much of the country. The Commerce Department said Wednesday durable goods orders rose 1.2% last month, rebounding from January when...
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Travelers wearing masks line up to buy train tickets at a railway station in Yichang in central China's Hubei province Wednesday, March 25, 2020. Trains carrying factory employees back to work after two months in locked-down cities rolled out of Hubei province, the center of China's virus outbreak, as the government on Wednesday began lifting the last of the controls that confined tens of millions of people to their homes. (Chinatopix via AP)
March 25, 2020 - 7:49 am
BEIJING (AP) — Trains carrying factory employees back to work after two months in locked-down cities rolled out of Hubei province, the center of China’s virus outbreak, as the government on Wednesday began lifting the last of the controls that confined tens of millions of people to their homes...
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FILE - In this Monday, March 2, 2020 file photo, Gilead Sciences CEO Daniel O'Day speaks at a meeting with President Donald Trump, members of the Coronavirus Task Force, and pharmaceutical executives in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. Gilead, the pharmaceutical giant that makes remdesivir, a promising coronavirus drug, has registered it as a rare disease treatment with U.S. regulators on Monday, March 23, 2020, a status that can potentially be worth millions in tax breaks and competition-free sales. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 24, 2020 - 9:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The pharmaceutical giant that makes a promising coronavirus drug has registered it as a rare disease treatment with U.S. regulators, a status that can potentially be worth millions in tax breaks and competition-free sales. What that specialty status will actually mean for the...
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A person wearing protective masks due to coronavirus fears walks past a boarded up business in Philadelphia, Tuesday, March 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
March 24, 2020 - 8:32 pm
The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Here's a look at developments Tuesday as central banks, businesses and workers attempt to navigate a global outbreak that has brought economic activity to a standstill...
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A person wearing protective masks due to coronavirus fears walks past a boarded up business in Philadelphia, Tuesday, March 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
March 24, 2020 - 8:16 pm
The rapid spread of the coronavirus since it was first reported in China has dealt an unprecedented shock to the global economy. Here's a look at developments Tuesday as central banks, businesses and workers attempt to navigate a global outbreak that has brought economic activity to a standstill...
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The empty court is seen at the Wells Fargo Center after an NBA basketball game between the Philadelphia 76ers and the Detroit Pistons, Wednesday, March 11, 2020, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)
March 24, 2020 - 7:40 pm
Major sports leagues and teams across the United States are being forced to write a new game plan on how to pay employees and keep the franchises solvent in the wake of a coronavirus pandemic that has all but stopped revenue and brought competition to a halt. Major League Baseball, the NFL and NBA...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2016, file photo, a pharmacist holds a package of EpiPens epinephrine auto-injector, a Mylan product, in Sacramento, Calif. On Tuesday, March 24, 2020, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned the public about malfunctions involving some EpiPens, the emergency injectors for severe allergic reactions. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
March 24, 2020 - 6:21 pm
U.S. regulators on Tuesday warned the public about malfunctions involving some EpiPens, the emergency injectors for severe allergic reactions. The Food and Drug Administration issued the warning after drugmakers Pfizer and Mylan told medical providers that the problems could cause death or serious...
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FILE - In this Dec. 6, 2019, file photo, Cindy Parlow Cone, then-vice-president of U.S. Soccer, attends a meeting of the organization's board of directors in Chicago. The newly installed president and chief executive officer of the U.S. Soccer Federation used their first news conference to say that settling a lawsuit filed by women's national team players is their priority. “A lot of damage has been done, and I think we are going to have to rebuild that trust and rebuild the relationship, and it's not going to happen overnight,” President Cindy Parlow Cone said Tuesday, March 24, 2020. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
March 24, 2020 - 6:20 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The newly installed president and chief executive officer of the U.S. Soccer Federation used their first news conference to state that settling a lawsuit filed by women's national team players is a top priority. “A lot of damage has been done, and I think we are going to have to...
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