Deciduous trees

In this Oct. 23, 2019, photo, apples collected by amateur botanists David Benscoter and EJ Brandt of the Lost Apple Project, rest on the ground in an orchard at an abandoned homestead near Genesee, Idaho. Benscoter and Brandt recently learned that their work in the fall of 2019 has led to the rediscovery of 10 apple varieties in the Pacific Northwest that were planted by long-ago pioneers and had been thought extinct. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
April 15, 2020 - 1:01 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A team of retirees that scours the remote ravines and windswept plains of the Pacific Northwest for long-forgotten pioneer orchards has rediscovered 10 apple varieties that were believed to be extinct — the largest number ever unearthed in a single season by the nonprofit Lost...
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A 17-year-old who asked not to be named wears a yellow hazmat suit, gas mask, boots, and gloves as he walks with his family, from Gaithersburg, Md., under cherry blossom trees in full bloom along the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. "I'm not worried for me since I'm young," says the 17-year-old, "I'm wearing this in case I come into contact with anyone who is older so that I won't be a threat to them." He plans to wear his protective outfit for coronavirus each time he leaves the house. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin areas have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
March 22, 2020 - 8:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — As signature cherry blossom trees go through peak bloom in the nation's capital, officials in the District of Columbia are resorting to mass street closures to keep large crowds away in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Public officials are publicly pleading for low turnout...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2009 file photo, Frank Knight, 101, of Yarmouth, Maine, stands in front of an elm tree known as "Herbie" in Yarmouth. Knight took care of the tree for about 50 years while working as the Yarmouth tree warden. The tree, estimated to be 217 years old, was cut down Jan. 19, 2010 after suffering numerous bouts of Dutch elm disease. "Herbie" may be gone, but he'll live on in cloned trees that are now being made available to the public. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
January 19, 2020 - 9:15 am
YARMOUTH, Maine (AP) — A massive elm tree nicknamed Herbie is long gone, but it is going to live on, thanks to cloned trees that are being made available to the public. At 110 feet and more than 200 years, Herbie was the tallest and oldest elm in New England and survived 14 bouts of Dutch elm...
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An unmodified, open-pollinated American chestnut bur grows on a tree at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry Lafayette Road Experiment Station in Syracuse, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The ESF American Chestnut Research & Restoration Project researchers have been able to add a gene to American chestnuts that give the trees resistance to a blight that decimated the trees in the 20th century. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)
November 06, 2019 - 4:22 pm
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Chestnuts harvested from high branches on a chilly fall morning look typical: they're marble sized, russet colored and nestled in prickly burs. But many are like no other nuts in nature. In a feat of genetic engineering, about half the chestnuts collected at this college...
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FILE - In this June 10, 2013, file photo, Harvey Updyke, left, leaves the Lee County Justice Center in Opelika, Ala., with his bail bondsman and his attorney. Updyke, the University of Alabama fan convicted of poisoning Auburn University’s oak trees, failed to attend a hearing, Wednesday, Oct. 30, 2019, on why he hasn’t paid court-ordered restitution. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)
October 30, 2019 - 4:48 pm
OPELIKA, Ala. (AP) — The University of Alabama fan convicted of poisoning Auburn University's oak trees failed to attend a hearing Wednesday on why he hasn't paid court-ordered restitution. The Opelika-Auburn news reports Harvey Updyke, a retired Texas state trooper who lives in Louisiana, didn't...
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FILE - In this April 23, 2013 photo, a man works to cut down the poisoned oak trees at Toomer's Corner at the entrance to Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. University of Alabama fan Harvey Updyke Jr. pleaded guilty to placing herbicide on the trees and was ordered to pay about $800,000 in restitution. He is due in court on Oct. 30, 2019, to explain why the money is not being paid. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
August 15, 2019 - 11:44 am
AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — A prosecutor wants to know why a University of Alabama fan who pleaded guilty to poisoning landmark oak trees at Auburn University isn't making court-ordered restitution payments. Harvey Updyke was ordered to appear in court Oct. 30 to explain himself, Lee County District...
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Visitors to the Oklahoma City National Memorial walk around the "Survivor Tree," a 100-year-old American elm and symbol of hope after the deadly 1995 bombing, Friday, April 19, 2019, in Oklahoma City. Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA of the tree symbolizing hope 24 years after the deadliest act of domestic terrorism on U.S. soil. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing, civic leaders on Friday plan to transplant a tree that was cloned from the scarred American elm that lived through the blast. They hope the younger elm will replace the "Survivor Tree" once it dies. (AP Photo/Adam Kealoha Causey)
April 19, 2019 - 6:08 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Science and technology are helping Oklahoma City to sustain the DNA — and the spirit — of a tree that has symbolized hope in the 24 years since the deadliest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history shook the city to its core. As part of an annual remembrance of the bombing,...
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Part of the sidewalk near the Jefferson Memorial is covered in water during high tide at the Tidal Basin in Washington, Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Decades of wear and tear from foot traffic, combined with rising sea levels and a deteriorating sea wall, have created a chronic flooding problem in the Tidal Basin, the manmade 107-acre reservoir that borders the Jefferson Memorial, home to the highest concentration of cherry blossom trees. (AP Photo/Ashraf Khalil)
April 03, 2019 - 4:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Washington's cherry blossom season has gone well this year, thanks to warm weather that has coincided perfectly with the annual blooming that draws hundreds of thousands of visitors each spring. But officials are claiming that Washington's iconic trees are under a looming threat...
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ADDS UPDATE OF NASHVILLE CITY DECISION ON TREES - Pedestrians make their way through a row of Cherry trees at Riverfront Park along First Ave. North in Nashville, Tenn., Saturday, March 30, 2019. Nashville was planning to cut down 21 cherry trees to make space for an NFL draft stage, but later Saturday, Nashville Mayor David Briley said the city won't cut down the trees. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)
April 01, 2019 - 10:14 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The leader of a Nashville organizing group for this month's NFL draft has apologized about initial plans to cut 21 ornamental cherry trees to make room for the event, which caused an uproar before it was modified. Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. CEO Butch Spyridon...
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ADDS UPDATE OF NASHVILLE CITY DECISION ON TREES - Pedestrians make their way through a row of Cherry trees at Riverfront Park along First Ave. North in Nashville, Tenn., Saturday, March 30, 2019. Nashville was planning to cut down 21 cherry trees to make space for an NFL draft stage, but later Saturday, Nashville Mayor David Briley said the city won't cut down the trees. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)
March 30, 2019 - 8:04 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The city of Nashville won't cut down 21 ornamental cherry trees to make space for an NFL draft stage, Mayor David Briley said Saturday. In a news release, Briley said he had informed the NFL and Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. that they will have to remove the trees...
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