Deserts

FILE - This June 1, 2019, file photo provided by the Center for Biological Diversity, shows the rare desert wildflower Tiehm's buckwheat in the Silver Peak Range about 120 miles southeast of Reno, Nev. An Australian mining company says its pursuit of a huge lithium deposit in Nevada is critical to accelerating the manufacture of electric vehicles and reducing greenhouse gases. Opponents argue the mine can't be built without causing the extinction of the only native population of the rare desert wildflower known to exist in the world. (Patrick Donnelly/Center for Biological Diversity via AP, File)
March 07, 2020 - 12:26 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The rare Tiehm's buckwheat stands less than a foot tall (30 centimeters) in Nevada's rocky high desert, its thin, leafless stems adorned with tiny yellow flowers in spring. To the Australian company that wants to mine lithium beneath the federal land where it grows, the perennial...
Read More
Construction crew perform a controlled detonation at the base of Monument Hill in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument west of Lukeville, Ariz., on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2020. Construction crews in southern Arizona have recently began blasting hills at the site to clear space for a new border wall system, bulldozing through a place called Monument Hill to construct a 30-foot (9-meter) steel wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Josh Galemore/Arizona Daily Star via AP)
February 26, 2020 - 7:13 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A Native American leader from Arizona grew emotional Wednesday as he told a congressional committee about the pain members of his tribe feel about U.S. officials blasting through land they consider sacred to build part of President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. “...
Read More
FILE - In this file photo taken on Wednesday May, 30, 2018, a member of the Army stand guard at the entrance of the headquarters of a new five-nation West African counter terror force, in Mali. As extremist violence grows across Africa, the United States is considering reducing its military presence on the continent, a move that worries its international partners who are working to strengthen the fight in the tumultuous Sahel region. (AP Photo/Baba Ahmed, File)
January 29, 2020 - 6:57 am
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — As extremist violence grows across Africa, the United States is considering reducing its military presence on the continent, a move that worries its international partners who are working to strengthen the fight in the tumultuous Sahel region. The timing is especially critical...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 4, 2013, file photo, mustangs recently captured on federal rangeland roam a corral at the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's holding facility north of Reno, in Palomino, Nev. Two House committee chairmen are trying to put the brakes on money for a new Trump administration proposal to accelerate the capture of 130,000 wild horses across the West over the next 10 years. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File)
December 12, 2019 - 1:58 am
RENO, Nev. (AP) — Two House committee chairmen are trying to put the brakes on money for a new Trump administration proposal to accelerate the capture of 130,000 wild horses across the West over the next 10 years. Rep. Dina Titus, D-Nevada, whose high-desert state is home to about half the mustangs...
Read More
FILE - In this June 11, 2019, file photo, Scott Warren, center, speaks outside federal court, in Tucson, Ariz., after a mistrial was declared in the federal case against him. Warren is scheduled to testify Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2019, in the second criminal case against his actions as a member of a humanitarian aid group. Prosecutors say Warren was arrested in early 2018 after harboring two men who sneaked across the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP Photo/Astrid Galvan, File)
November 19, 2019 - 7:32 pm
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A member of a humanitarian aid group whose criminal case has garnered international attention testified Tuesday that neutrality guides his work near the U.S.-Mexico border, denying that he has ever helped migrants hide or told them how to avoid authorities. That’s what U.S...
Read More
FILE - This July 16, 2013, file photo shows a sign at Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. Facebook is trying to coax “news deserts” into bloom with the expansion of a tool that provides people with local news and information, but says it still has a lot to learn. The social media giant said Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, it is expanding its “Today In” service to 6,000 cities and towns across the U.S., up from 400 previously. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
September 12, 2019 - 6:04 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Facebook is trying to coax "news deserts" into bloom with the second major expansion of a tool that exposes people to more local news and information. But the social network confesses that it still has a lot to learn. The social media giant said Thursday it is expanding its "...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo a bison from Yellowstone National Park walks through the snow shortly before being shot and killed during a hunt by members of an American Indian tribe, near Gardiner, Mont. U.S. officials have rejected a petition to protect the park's roughly 4,500 bison, which are routinely hunted and sent to slaughter to guard against the spread of disease to cattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
September 05, 2019 - 8:04 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials rejected petitions Thursday to protect Yellowstone National Park's storied bison herds but pledged to consider more help for two other species — a tiny, endangered squirrel in Arizona and bees that pollinate rare desert flowers in Nevada. Wildlife...
Read More
Workers break ground on new border wall construction about 20 miles west of Santa Teresa, New Mexico, Aug. 23, 2019. The wall visible on the left was built in 2018 with money allocated by Congress, while the new construction is funded by money reallocated from Department of Defense funding. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio)
August 23, 2019 - 6:53 pm
SANTA TERESA, N.M. (AP) — Work crews in Arizona and New Mexico forged ahead Friday with construction of taller border fencing funded through a national emergency declaration by President Donald Trump. The work on his hallmark campaign promise involves mostly replacement fencing along a 46-mile...
Read More
A rugged uphill section of the international border wall that runs through Organ Pipe National Monument is shown, Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019 in Lukeville, Ariz. Construction on a two mile portion of replacement fencing funded by President Trump's national emergency declaration has begun in an area near the official border crossing that runs through Organ Pipe. (AP Photo/Matt York)
AP News
August 22, 2019 - 9:11 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Construction crews broke ground Thursday on a small portion of the $664 million border fence project in the Arizona desert that is funded through President Donald Trump's national emergency declaration. Crews plan on installing 30-foot (9-meter) steel fencing to replace older...
Read More
FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 1:42 pm
GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious. "...
Read More

Pages