Diagnosis and treatment

FILE - In this April 20, 2015 file photo, a Canadian flag with a cannabis leaf flies on Parliament Hill during a 4/20 protest in Ottawa, Ontario. Canada is following the lead of Uruguay in allowing a nationwide, legal marijuana market, although each Canadian province is working up its own rules for pot sales. The federal government and the provinces also still need to publish regulations that will govern the cannabis trade. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press via AP, File)
June 21, 2018 - 2:05 am
Mail-order weed? You betcha! With marijuana legalization across Canada on the horizon, the industry is shaping up to look different from the way it does in nine U.S. states that have legalized adult recreational use of the drug. Age limits, government involvement in distribution and sales, and...
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In this Monday, April 23, 2018, photo, Lukas Inman, 19, interacts with his father in Colorado Springs, Colo. Inman suffers from a rare and severe form of epilepsy called Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome. A British pharmaceutical company is getting closer to a decision on whether the U.S government will approve the first prescription drug derived from the marijuana plant, but parents, including Lukas,' who for years have used cannabis to treat severe forms of epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory. (AP Photo/Thomas Peipert)
June 19, 2018 - 2:41 pm
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Some American parents who for years have used cannabis to treat severe forms of epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory as U.S. regulators near a decision on whether to approve the first drug derived from the marijuana plant. The U.S...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2018 file photo, Billy Caldwell sits with his mother Charlotte. Former British Foreign Secretary William Hague called Tuesday, June 19 for the government to take steps toward legalizing marijuana. Hague changed his public stance on cannabis policy days after the government relented and allowed a 12-year-old epileptic boy to receive cannabis oil treatment that his mother said was needed to prevent life-threatening seizures. Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he was convinced after talking to clinicians that the boy, Billy Caldwell, faced a medical crisis.(Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP, File)
June 19, 2018 - 8:29 am
LONDON (AP) — The British government announced Tuesday it was reviewing its ban on cannabis-based medicines but rejected calls to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Home Secretary Sajid Javid told lawmakers that the cases like that of a 12-year-old epileptic boy denied cannabis oil for his...
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Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell stands following a news conference at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia on Monday, June 18, 2018. Rendell said he was diagnosed three-and-a-half years ago with Parkinson's disease. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
June 18, 2018 - 12:25 pm
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell said Monday that he was diagnosed 3½ years ago with Parkinson's disease, but said he believes that treatment has stopped the progression of the disease and he has maintained his quality of life. The 74-year-old Rendell made the announcement...
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June 18, 2018 - 6:10 am
LONDON (AP) — British Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says Britain must quickly review its policies on medical marijuana use in light of the case of a 12-year-old boy whose mother says he needs cannabis oil to prevent dangerous seizures. British officials intervened over the weekend to allow the boy...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2018 file photo, Billy Caldwell sits with his mother Charlotte. Former British Foreign Secretary William Hague called Tuesday, June 19 for the government to take steps toward legalizing marijuana. Hague changed his public stance on cannabis policy days after the government relented and allowed a 12-year-old epileptic boy to receive cannabis oil treatment that his mother said was needed to prevent life-threatening seizures. Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he was convinced after talking to clinicians that the boy, Billy Caldwell, faced a medical crisis.(Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP, File)
June 17, 2018 - 6:59 am
LONDON (AP) — The mother of an epileptic boy at the center of a debate over medical marijuana in the U.K. is calling for an urgent meeting with ministers to discuss liberalizing British policy. Charlotte Caldwell said Sunday she also wants assurances from the government that her 12-year-old son...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2018 file photo, Billy Caldwell sits with his mother Charlotte. Former British Foreign Secretary William Hague called Tuesday, June 19 for the government to take steps toward legalizing marijuana. Hague changed his public stance on cannabis policy days after the government relented and allowed a 12-year-old epileptic boy to receive cannabis oil treatment that his mother said was needed to prevent life-threatening seizures. Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he was convinced after talking to clinicians that the boy, Billy Caldwell, faced a medical crisis.(Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP, File)
June 16, 2018 - 11:44 am
LONDON (AP) — The British government changed course Saturday in a case concerning cannabis oil, saying an epileptic boy can be treated with it after his mother said he needed it to survive severe seizures. Home Secretary Sajid Javid said he has agreed to urgently issue a license to allow Billy...
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June 15, 2018 - 3:47 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A Houston hospital announced Friday that it has reactivated its renowned heart transplant program after a two-week suspension of all medical procedures following the deaths this year of several patients. Baylor St. Luke's Medical Center's decision to temporarily halt its program came...
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June 15, 2018 - 12:19 pm
LISBON, Portugal (AP) — Portugal's parliament has given final legislative approval for the use of marijuana-based medicines, which are already permitted in other European countries. An initial parliamentary debate five months ago considered a provision allowing patients to grow and use marijuana,...
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FILE - This June 8, 2007 file photo shows a glass of milk on a table during a family breakfast in Montgomery, Ala. Nearly 20 years ago, about nearly half of high school students said they drank at least one glass of milk a day. But now it’s down to less than a third, according to a survey released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, June 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Rob Carr)
June 14, 2018 - 7:04 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Fewer U.S. teens are smoking, having sex and doing drugs these days. Oh, and they're drinking less milk, too. Less than one-third of high school students drink a glass of milk a day, according to a large government survey released Thursday. About two decades ago, it was nearly half...
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