Discrimination

FILE - This March 9, 2017, file photo shows celebrated chef Thomas Keller in the kitchen of his French Laundry restaurant in Yountville, Calif. A jury has found the Thomas Keller Restaurant Group not guilty of pregnancy discrimination. The verdict Wednesday, June 26, 2019, exonerates the famous chef and his acclaimed restaurants, Per Se in New York and the French Laundry in California, of wrongdoing alleged by former employee Vannessa Scott-Allen. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
June 26, 2019 - 7:10 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury in Napa Valley cleared the Thomas Keller Restaurant Group of wrongdoing in a pregnancy discrimination trial that ended Wednesday. The verdict exonerates the famous chef and his acclaimed restaurants — Per Se in New York and the French Laundry in California — of charges...
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Members of the media gather for a walk-through of the stage set-up for the first democratic debate, Wednesday, June 26, 2019. Ten presidential candidates, led by Sen. Elizabeth Warren, are set to converge on the debate stage on the first night of Democratic debates to offer their pitches to the American people and attempt a breakout moment for their campaigns. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)
June 26, 2019 - 3:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Executives of Facebook, Google and Twitter faced questioning by a House panel Wednesday on their efforts to stanch terrorist content and viral misinformation on their social media platforms. The scrutiny comes as the tech giants step up safety measures to prevent disinformation...
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June 25, 2019 - 7:31 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by nine former University of Minnesota football players who claimed their rights were violated after a woman alleged she was the victim of a gang rape in 2016. The Star Tribune reports that U.S. District Judge Donovan Frank found no...
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June 25, 2019 - 7:02 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A three-week pregnancy discrimination trial against celebrity chef Thomas Keller and his acclaimed New York and Napa Valley restaurants is coming to a close. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that lawyers finished closing arguments Monday in Napa County Superior Court and the...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2019 file photo Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross testifies during the House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a filing, Monday, June 24, 2019. In his court filing, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland reasoned that new evidence "potentially connects the dots between a discriminatory purpose" and a decision by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to add the citizenship question. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
June 25, 2019 - 5:45 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — A lawsuit that alleges a 2020 census question pushed by the Trump administration violates minorities' rights will be sent back to a federal court in Maryland so new evidence can be considered, U.S. appeals judges ruled Tuesday. The 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' decision comes a day...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2016 file photo, Alphonso David speaks during a swearing-in ceremony at the Court of Appeals in Albany, N.Y. David, a civil rights lawyer who has been serving as chief counsel to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, was named Tuesday, June 25, 2019, as the new president of the Human Rights Campaign, the largest LGBT-rights organization in the U.S. David will be the first African American to lead the HRC since its founding in 1980. He will be its seventh president, succeeding Chad Griffin, who has held the post since 2012. (AP Photo/Mike Groll, File)
June 25, 2019 - 2:02 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Alphonso David, a civil rights lawyer who has been serving as chief counsel to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, was named Tuesday as the new president of the Human Rights Campaign, the largest LGBTQ-rights organization in the U.S. David, 48, is the first African American to lead the...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks at the Poor People's Moral Action Congress presidential forum in Washington, Monday, June 17, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
June 25, 2019 - 6:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Kamala Harris nodded knowingly when a black woman at a weekend candidate forum recounted watching her mother face racial discrimination during her childhood. "You and I have a similar experience growing up," said Harris, the California senator and former prosecutor who would be...
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FILE - This April 30, 2018 file photo shows a woman knitting in Silverdale Wash. A free, 8-million strong social network for knitters, crocheters and others in the fiber arts has banned any talk of President Donald Trump and his administration. The new policy on Ravelry.com was posted Sunday, June 23, 2019. The post says the site took the action because it can’t provide a space “inclusive of all and also allow support for open white supremacy.” (Larry Steagall/Kitsap Sun via AP, File)
June 24, 2019 - 4:06 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A free, 8-million strong social network for knitters, crocheters and others in the fiber arts has banned any mention of support for President Donald Trump and his administration. The new policy on Ravelry.com was posted Sunday. The post says the site took the action because it can't...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2019 file photo Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross testifies during the House Oversight Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a filing, Monday, June 24, 2019. In his court filing, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland reasoned that new evidence "potentially connects the dots between a discriminatory purpose" and a decision by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to add the citizenship question. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
June 24, 2019 - 1:21 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — New evidence paints a "disturbing picture" that racial discrimination may be the motive behind the Trump administration's push to ask everyone in the country about citizenship status, a federal judge wrote in a Monday filing. Last week, U.S. District Judge George Hazel of Maryland...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail shows James Alex Fields Jr. A sentencing hearing has been moved up for the self-avowed white supremacist convicted of federal hate crimes for plowing his car into a crowd of anti-racism protesters at a 2017 white nationalist rally in Virginia. Fields was originally scheduled to be sentenced July 3, 2019. A notice filed in court says the hearing has been moved to June 28. (Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail via AP, File)
June 23, 2019 - 10:47 am
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The avowed white supremacist who plowed his car into counterdemonstrators opposing a white nationalist rally in Virginia two years ago, killing one person and injuring dozens, has asked a judge for mercy and a sentence shorter than life in prison. Lawyers for James Alex Fields...
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