Drug abuse

In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 5:18 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
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May 02, 2017 - 1:50 am
Pleasure. Craving. Withdrawal. When opioids act on the brain, they trigger the same processes that give people feelings of pleasure from activities like eating, but they do it far more intensely. Opioids also make some brain cells pump out a chemical messenger called dopamine, which encourages more...
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In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 1:46 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
Read More
In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 1:03 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
Read More
April 30, 2017 - 4:21 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah pharmacists will start putting red stickers on bottles of opioids that warn patients about the risk of overdose and addiction as part of a new awareness campaign to combat painkiller abuses and deaths. The Utah Department of Health's monthlong campaign kicks off Monday...
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Inmates listen during a program at the Twin Towers Correctional Facility Thursday, April 27, 2017, in Los Angeles. One of the world's largest jail complexes is located in Los Angeles and within it resides perhaps the world's largest group of inmates whose mental illness is attributed to drug abuse, mainly from highly addictive methamphetamine. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
April 29, 2017 - 3:44 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Perhaps the largest group of mentally ill inmates in the U.S. resides in Los Angeles in one of the world's largest jail complexes. Over the past seven years, the jail's population has spiked almost 50 percent — with nearly every inmate having both mental illness and substance...
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In this Monday, March 13, 2017 photo, Ian Lewis, poses in the lobby of Hope Academy in Indianapolis. Lewis wants to be a vet someday. His owl-and-skull tattoo remind him to be wiser than two user friends who overdosed and a third who died driving drunk. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
April 25, 2017 - 7:03 am
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — When Logan Snyder got hooked on pills after a prescription to treat pain from a kidney stone, she joined the millions already swept up in the nation's grim wave of addiction to opioid painkillers. She was just 14. Youth is a drawback when it comes to kicking drugs. Only half of...
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In this Monday, March 13, 2017 photo, Ian Lewis, poses in the lobby of Hope Academy in Indianapolis. Lewis wants to be a vet someday. His owl-and-skull tattoo remind him to be wiser than two user friends who overdosed and a third who died driving drunk. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
April 25, 2017 - 1:38 am
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — When Logan Snyder got hooked on pills after a prescription to treat pain from a kidney stone, she joined the millions already swept up in the nation's grim wave of addiction to opioid painkillers. She was just 14. Youth is a drawback when it comes to kicking drugs. Only half of...
Read More

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