Economic policy

June 16, 2017 - 12:27 am
TOKYO (AP) — The Bank of Japan has opted to keep its lax monetary policy intact, while noting signs of improvement in the world's third largest economy. A BOJ statement issued Friday said it expects demand to accelerate, supporting a "moderate expansion." The central bank's key interest rate...
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German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble, left, speaks with from right, European Commissioner for Economy Pierre Moscovici, Greek Finance Minister Euclid Tsakalotos, and French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire during a meeting of eurogroup finance ministers at the European Council building in Luxembourg on Thursday, June 15, 2017. Eurogroup finance ministers met on Thursday to review the bailout program for Greece. (AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert)
June 15, 2017 - 6:42 pm
LUXEMBOURG (AP) — Greece avoided another potential brush with bankruptcy after striking a deal Thursday with European creditors to tide it over for the rest of the year and gained assurances that its repayment burden will be eased when it finally can stand on its own after nearly a decade on...
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FILE - In this Thursday, Feb. 2, 2017 file photo, Mark Carney, Governor of the Bank of England listens during a quarterly Inflation Report press conference at the bank in London. The Bank of England has decided Thursday, June 15, 2017, to keep its main interest rate at a record low of 0.25 percent as the economy weakens ahead of Britain's departure from the European Union. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
June 15, 2017 - 11:47 am
LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England is closer to raising interest rates for the first time in a decade than many had expected, with a growing number of its rate-setters appearing worried about a spike in inflation that is eating into the living standards of the British. At its latest policy meeting...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during his annual televised call-in show in Moscow on Thursday, June 15, 2017.(Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
June 15, 2017 - 7:21 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia has climbed out of recession despite continuing Western sanctions, President Vladimir Putin said Thursday, adding that the restrictions have forced the country to "switch on our brains" to reduce its dependence on energy exports. Speaking in a live call-in show televised...
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Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves after a meeting with the Leader of Northern Ireland's Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) Arlene Foster at 10 Downing Street after the general election in London, Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Britain's prime minister has begun talks with a Northern Ireland-based party Tuesday to see if they can create an alliance to push through the Conservative Party's agenda after a disastrous snap election left her short of a majority in Parliament. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
June 15, 2017 - 7:20 am
LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has decided to keep its main interest rate at a record low of 0.25 percent as the economy weakens ahead of Britain's departure from the European Union. But the decision was split, with three of the bank's eight policymakers surprisingly voting for a rate increase...
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Russian President Vladimir Putin listens during his annual televised call-in show in Moscow on Thursday, June 15, 2017.(Mikhail Klimentyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)
June 15, 2017 - 6:05 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Russia has climbed out of recession despite the continuing Western sanctions, President Vladimir Putin said Thursday, adding that the restrictions have forced the country to "switch on our brains" to reduce its dependence on energy exports. Speaking in a live call-in show televised...
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People walk near an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 index at a securities firm Thursday, June 15, 2017, in Tokyo. Shares fell in Asia on Thursday after the U.S. Federal Reserve raised interest rates, as expected. Japan's benchmark slipped as the yen gained against the dollar. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
June 15, 2017 - 6:00 am
TOKYO (AP) — Shares fell in Europe and Asia on Thursday after the U.S. Federal Reserve pushed ahead with its latest interest rate hike. Greece was meeting with European creditors to discuss further relief of its debt load. KEEPING SCORE: Germany's DAX fell 0.6 percent to 12,727.14 while the CAC40...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 11, 2016, file photo, specialist Anthony Rinaldi is silhouetted on a screen at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Stocks are at peak levels. Bonds are making money despite a raft of predictions to the contrary at the start of 2017. Even stock markets overseas, notoriously poor investments for much of the last decade, are perking higher. If it feels precarious to have so many investments doing so well, even when the economy itself is still growing only modestly, markets are giving few indications of worry. But contrarians are feeling more reasons to pause. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
June 15, 2017 - 3:46 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Everything is awesome for investors. Everything. Stocks are at peak levels. Bonds are making money despite a raft of predictions to the contrary at the start of the year. Stock markets overseas, notoriously poor investments for much of the last decade, are perking higher. Even gold...
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FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 11, 2016, file photo, specialist Anthony Rinaldi is silhouetted on a screen at his post on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange. Stocks are at peak levels. Bonds are making money despite a raft of predictions to the contrary at the start of 2017. Even stock markets overseas, notoriously poor investments for much of the last decade, are perking higher. If it feels precarious to have so many investments doing so well, even when the economy itself is still growing only modestly, markets are giving few indications of worry. But contrarians are feeling more reasons to pause. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
June 15, 2017 - 3:01 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Everything is awesome for investors. Everything. Stocks are at peak levels. Bonds are making money despite a raft of predictions to the contrary at the start of the year. Stock markets overseas, notoriously poor investments for much of the last decade, are perking higher. Even gold...
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FILE - In this March 6, 2017, file photo, home equity and auto loan rates are displayed at a bank in North Andover, Mass. The impact of the Federal Reserve’s fourth interest rate hike in 18 months will range widely for individuals and businesses with loans or income-producing accounts. People with adjustable-rate mortgages or home equity lines of credit will soon pay more, but most would-be home buyers needn’t worry. And auto loan rates won’t likely change much. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
June 15, 2017 - 12:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Credit card holders will soon pay more. So will people with adjustable-rate mortgages or home equity lines of credit. But most would-be home buyers needn't worry. And auto loan rates won't likely change much. For savers? Rates should creep up, at least for the highest-yielding CDs...
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