Emergency care

FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2019, file photo, Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. Demand for answers escalated as federal officials promised Friday, Aug. 30, 2019, to conduct a sweeping investigation into suspicious deaths at Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center in Clarksburg, W.Va. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
September 11, 2019 - 5:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government may be required to pay billions of dollars in emergency care claims to veterans after a federal court ruled this week that the Department of Veterans Affairs improperly denied reimbursements for such care received at non-VA facilities. The ruling by the U.S. Court...
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A roofer works on a new home under construction Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Houston. A heat wave is expected to send temperatures soaring close to 100 degrees through the weekend across much of the country. The National Weather Service estimates that more than 100 heat records will fall on Saturday. Most will not be the scorching daily highs, but for lack of cooling at night, something called nighttime lows. Those lows will be record highs. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 18, 2019 - 3:24 pm
Public housing officials in Chicago were planning wellbeing checks on residents as the heat and humidity are expected to mount to dangerous levels as part of a wave of sweltering weather covering a substantial portion of the U.S. Routine checks also will be done to make sure the temperature in...
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In this Monday, July 8, 2019 photo, Jiggy Athilingam poses for photos at her home in Richmond, Calif. Athilingam, who was hit from behind by a car while riding a bicycle in San Francisco five years ago, had two forms of health insurance and assumed it would pay for most of her bills. But because she was treated at a hospital that was outside of her health insurance company's network, she got hit with a surprise bill - a common story in the country's complex health care system. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
July 09, 2019 - 3:12 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Jiggy Athilingam was riding a bicycle in San Francisco five years ago when suddenly she was on a bed in the hallway of a hospital. "What happened?" she asked. A cracked helmet told the story of her memory loss: She had been hit from behind by a car. She spent 22 hours in a...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2019, file photo, Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., walks to the Senate at the Capitol in Washington. A new study says about once in every six times someone is taken to an emergency room or checks in to a hospital as an in-patient, the treatment is followed by a “surprise” medical bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 20, 2019 - 8:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Roughly one in every six times someone is taken to an emergency room or checks in to the hospital, the treatment is followed by a "surprise" medical bill, according to a study released Thursday. And depending on where you live, the odds can be much higher. The report from the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2016 file photo, a lawyer holds a battery that was removed from a toddler's esophagus at a news conference in Jacksonville, Fla. A study published Friday, April 12, 2019 in the journal Pediatrics found a sharp increase in emergency room visits involving swallowed objects by kids under age 6. (Bruce Lipsky/The Florida Times-Union via AP)
April 12, 2019 - 12:52 am
CHICAGO (AP) — The number of young kids who went to U.S. emergency rooms because they swallowed toys, coins, batteries and other objects has more than doubled, a new study says. In 2015, there were nearly 43,000 such visits among kids under 6, compared with 22,000 in 1995, according to the study...
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FILE - This Monday, Jan. 28, 2019 file photo shows marijuana buds ready for harvest in Akron, Ohio. A study shows marijuana is sending more people to the emergency room in one large Denver hospital. Inhaled weed caused the most severe problems. Marijuana-infused foods and candies also led to trouble.(AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
March 25, 2019 - 9:27 pm
Five years after Colorado first legalized marijuana, a new study shows pot's bad effects are sending more people to the emergency room. Inhaled marijuana caused the most severe problems at one large Denver area hospital. Marijuana-infused foods and candies, called edibles, also led to trouble...
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A pedestrian walk past a building housing the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Providence, R.I. On Tuesday a prominent physicians' group asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture to investigate the school, arguing that it is violating the law by using live pigs for training in emergency medicine. (AP Photo/Jennifer McDermott)
January 30, 2019 - 9:35 am
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A prominent physicians' group has asked federal regulators to investigate Brown University's medical school, arguing it is violating the law by using live pigs for training in emergency medicine. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine on Tuesday asked the U.S...
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October 01, 2018 - 9:41 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Police officers in Florida on Monday fatally shot an unarmed patient they say told hospital emergency room workers that he had a gun and that "it was going to end right here today." Orlando Police Chief John Mina said during a news conference that the man was taken to Orlando...
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In this Feb. 22, 2018 photo, Venezuelan Grecia Sabala cries as she talks about her medical condition, after going through the border checkpoint into Cucuta, Colombia, on the border with Venezuela. Sabala crossed the border to get treatment for cervical cancer, at a specialized clinic in Cucuta. Each day cancer patients seeking chemotherapy, malnourished children and adults with untreated infections make the trek across the Simon Bolivar International Bridge to hospitals in Colombia. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)
March 08, 2018 - 1:11 am
CUCUTA, Colombia (AP) — In a cramped hospital near Colombia's border with Venezuela, migrants fill stretchers bearing the wounds of the deteriorating nation they left behind. An 18-year-old woman rubbed her swollen belly after fleeing with her infant daughter when the wounds from her C-section...
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Michael Catania, vice president of product development, holds up a patient sample at Banyan Biomarkers Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018, in San Diego. The company is developing a blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries. (AP Photo/Denis Poroy)
February 14, 2018 - 8:29 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The first blood test to help doctors diagnose traumatic brain injuries has won U.S. government approval. The move means Banyan Biomarkers can commercialize its test, giving the company an early lead in the biotech industry's race to find a way to diagnose concussions. The test doesn'...
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