Environment and nature

FILE - This March 13, 2014 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a female wolf from the Minam pack outside La Grande, Ore., after it was fitted with a tracking collar. Environmental groups have withdrawn from talks aimed at updating the wolf management plan in Oregon. Wolf conservation advocates, ranchers and hunters have been meeting with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for months to update the rules that protect and manage the state's rebounding wolf population. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, file)
January 07, 2019 - 6:07 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Environmental groups in Oregon announced Monday they have withdrawn from talks on how to manage the state's rebounding wolf population because of what they called a "broken" process, and concerns that state wildlife officials want to make it easier to kill wolves that eat...
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A woman walks past trash piled next to a garbage bin at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Thursday, Jan. 3, 2019. Nonprofits, businesses and state governments across the country are paying bills and putting in volunteer hours in an uphill battle to keep national parks safe and clean for visitors as the partial U.S. government shutdown lingers. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
January 06, 2019 - 4:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Interior Department will dip into user fees to pay for staffing national parks during the government shutdown. That's according to House Democrats who were notified Sunday of the department's plan to use Federal Land and Recreation Enhancement money. Parks have largely...
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FILE- In this Aug. 19, 2015 photo, Tom Merriman stands behind a monarch in his butterfly atrium at his nursery in Vista, Calif. Researchers with an environmental group are labeling as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it says is an 86 percent decline since 2017. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
January 06, 2019 - 3:27 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Researchers with an environmental group have labeled as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it said is an 86 percent decline...
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FILE- In this Sept. 8, 2018 file photo, a ship tows The Ocean Cleanup's first buoyant trash-collecting device toward the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco en route to the Pacific Ocean. A trash collection device deployed to corral plastic litter floating between California and Hawaii will be hauled back to dry land for repairs. Boyan Slat, who launched the Pacific Ocean cleanup project, tells NBC the 2,000-foot (600-meter) long floating boom will be towed to Hawaii. If it can't be repaired there it will be loaded on a barge and returned to its home port of Alameda, Calif. The boom broke apart under constant wind and waves. Slat says he's disappointed, but not discouraged. (AP Photo/Lorin Eleni Gill, File)
January 06, 2019 - 2:54 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A trash collection device deployed to corral plastic litter floating in the Pacific Ocean between California and Hawaii has broken apart will be hauled back to dry land for repairs. Boyan Slat, who launched the Pacific Ocean cleanup project, told NBC News last week that the 2,000...
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Musher Michael Ruopp is pulled by his huskies as he rides on a field near Lichtenstein, Germany, Sunday, Jan.6, 2019. (Thomas Warnack/dpa via AP)
January 06, 2019 - 11:08 am
BERLIN (AP) — Authorities warned Sunday of a high risk of avalanches on the northern side of the Alps, after heavy snowfall in recent days created dangerous conditions across parts of southern Germany, Austria and Switzerland. A 20-year-old skier died in an avalanche Saturday on Mount Teisen, near...
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January 06, 2019 - 8:22 am
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — At least 30 Afghan villagers searching for gold in a riverbed perished on Sunday in a flash flood in northeastern Badakhshan province, provincial officials said. Along with those killed, dozens were also injured as a landslide and flash flood engulfed the river in the...
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January 06, 2019 - 7:51 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Several African countries with some of the world's largest elephant populations will push this year for looser controls on legal ivory trade, while another group of countries on the continent says more restrictions are the best way to curb the illegal killing of elephants for...
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FILE - In an Aug. 11, 2015 file photo, n Air Force military member walks out to medevac biocontainment unit aboard a C-17 military transport plane at Dobbins Air Force Reserve Base during a media tour, in Marietta, Ga. There are fears that groundwater near Georgia military bases could remain contaminated from a toxic firefighting foam used for decades by the U.S. Air Force. Recent tests at Georgia's three air bases show extensive environmental contamination of groundwater. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
January 05, 2019 - 5:17 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — Groundwater near Georgia military bases remains contaminated from a toxic firefighting foam used for decades by the U.S. Air Force, prompting fears among residents about their exposure to the chemicals. Recent tests at Georgia's three air bases show extensive environmental...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018 photo, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra discusses various issues during an interview with The Associated Press, in Sacramento, Calif. As the state's first Latino attorney general, Becerra is uniquely positioned to opposed the Trump administration's immigration crackdown. He says he’s forced to sue Trump to defend California’s people, values and resources. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
January 04, 2019 - 11:52 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Xavier Becerra became perhaps the nation's most influential attorney general when he was named California's top lawyer two years ago, and he has since used his post atop what some call the "Resistance State" to pummel President Donald Trump's administration with dozens of...
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FILE - In this June 29, 2017, file photo, Vice President Mike Pence, left, waves as he is introduced to speak at the Department of Energy in Washington, as Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke watches. As former U.S. Interior Secretary Zinke exits Washington amid a cloud of unresolved ethics investigations, he says he has lived up to the conservation ideals of Teddy Roosevelt and insists the myriad allegations against him will be proven untrue. Zinke said he quit President Donald Trump’s cabinet on his own terms, despite indications he was pressured by the White House to resign effective Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
January 04, 2019 - 6:29 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — As former U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke exits Washington chased by ethics investigations and criticism of his actions favoring industry, he told The Associated Press he's lived up to the conservation ideals of Theodore Roosevelt and insisted the myriad allegations...
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