Environmental health

June 11, 2018 - 2:27 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's largest public housing agency will pay billions of dollars to settle claims that it lied to the federal government about failing to comply with lead paint regulations and other maintenance issues that endangered low-income residents and their children, federal...
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FILE - This April 15, 2011, file photo, shows a bottle of Johnson's baby powder. A Southern California jury has ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay more than $25 million to a woman who claimed in a lawsuit that she developed cancer by using the company's talc-based baby powder. Jurors on Thursday, May 24, 2018, awarded $4 million in punitive damages after finding that Johnson & Johnson acted with "malice, oppression or fraud." (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
May 24, 2018 - 6:30 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A California jury delivered a $25.7 million verdict against Johnson & Johnson in a lawsuit brought by a woman who claimed she developed cancer by using the company's talc-based baby powder. Jurors in Los Angeles recommended $4 million in punitive damages Thursday after...
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April 08, 2018 - 2:06 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Seven decades after making key portions of the atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki, Japan, workers at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation are being exposed to radiation as they tear down buildings that helped create the nation's nuclear arsenal. Dozens of workers demolishing a...
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April 04, 2018 - 6:45 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Joe Arvai, University of Michigan (THE CONVERSATION) In 2017, just a few days after Donald Trump was sworn in as president, a freshman GOP lawmaker with only a few days on the job of...
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April 04, 2018 - 6:14 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Poaching, poisoning and other hazards have taken a heavy toll on Africa's endangered vultures. New research suggests that the scavengers also face another threat — toxic bullet lead that they ingest while eating the carcasses of animals shot by legal hunters. One-third of nearly...
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In this Jan. 24, 2018 photo, Galena Park is hemmed in by heavy industry just east of downtown Houston along the ship channel. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)
March 23, 2018 - 7:22 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — A toxic onslaught from the nation's petrochemical hub was largely overshadowed by the record-shattering deluge of Hurricane Harvey as residents and first responders struggled to save lives and property. More than a half-year after floodwaters swamped America's fourth-largest city,...
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In this Aug. 30, 2017 photo, the Arkema chemical plant is flooded from Hurricane Harvey in Crosby, Texas, northeast of Houston. Nearby residents complain of a 'bitter taste' about the sparse information authorities provided when chemicals at the plant caught fire. They say the company failed to provide sufficient warning beforehand while environmental officials misled them with assurances that the air and water were safe. Critics say testing by authorities and contractors was inadequate to determine whether public health was threatened. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via AP)
March 22, 2018 - 6:49 am
CROSBY, Texas (AP) — The skeleton crew at Arkema's chemical plant knew it was time to go by the morning of Aug. 29. Flooding from Hurricane Harvey had knocked out power. Thousands of gallons of chemical-laden water had spilled into the floodwaters. Soon, the company's stores of volatile organic...
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In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks to the Senate chamber early shortly before midnight Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The weeklong drama over the hourslong government shutdown set loose overblown rhetoric from both parties while President Donald Trump wrestled inartfully with turmoil in the stock market, one of his favorite bragging points until it tanked. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
February 12, 2018 - 12:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — That blink-of-an-eye government shutdown last week produced a torrent of words leading up to it, not all of them loyal to reality. Misshapen rhetoric surrounded the stock market dive, too, as President Donald Trump struggled with the loss, at least for now, of bragging rights over...
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In this Feb. 8, 2018, photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks to the Senate chamber early shortly before midnight Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. The weeklong drama over the hourslong government shutdown set loose overblown rhetoric from both parties while President Donald Trump wrestled inartfully with turmoil in the stock market, one of his favorite bragging points until it tanked. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
February 10, 2018 - 5:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The weeklong drama over the hourslong government shutdown set loose overblown rhetoric from both parties while President Donald Trump wrestled inartfully with turmoil in the stock market, one of his favorite bragging points until it tanked. On the sidelines of the budget battle,...
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FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Pruitt is once again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. Pruitt has been champion for the continued burning of fossil fuels while expressing doubt about the consensus of climate scientists that man-made carbon emissions are overwhelmingly the cause of record temperature increases observed around the world. In an interview with KSNV-TV in Las Vegas on Feb. 7, Pruitt made several statements that are undercut by the work of climate scientists, including those at his own agency. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
February 08, 2018 - 12:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency is again understating the threat posed by climate change, this time by suggesting that global warming may be a good thing for humanity. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has championed the continued burning of fossil fuels while...
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