Genetic engineering

November 20, 2017 - 9:28 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Deepak Kumar, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Stephen P. Long, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and Vijay Singh, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (THE...
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October 04, 2017 - 3:34 pm
MIAMI (AP) — U.S. Food and Drug Administration officials say genetically modified mosquitoes are not "drugs" and should be regulated by environmental authorities. According to guidelines posted online Wednesday, federal officials have decided that mosquitoes engineered by the biotech firm Oxitec...
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FILE- This April 18, 2017, file photo shows the suburban Minneapolis headquarters of Syngenta in Minnetonka, Minn. Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta said Tuesday, Sept. 26, that it has agreed to settle tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits by farmers over the company's rollout of a genetically engineered corn seed variety before China approved it for imports. Terms weren't disclosed. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
September 26, 2017 - 6:40 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta said Tuesday it has agreed to settle tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits by farmers over the company's rollout of a genetically engineered corn seed variety before China approved it for imports. Terms weren't disclosed. Syngenta said in a...
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September 26, 2017 - 2:29 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Swiss agribusiness giant Syngenta said Tuesday it has agreed to settle tens of thousands of U.S. lawsuits by farmers over the company's rollout of a genetically engineered corn seed variety before China approved it for imports. Terms weren't disclosed. Syngenta said in a...
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September 13, 2017 - 11:37 am
BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union court ruled Wednesday in favor of an Italian activist farmer who has defied his nation's laws by planting genetically modified corn. Italy has prosecuted Giorgio Fidenato for cultivating the corn on his land, citing concerns the crops could endanger human health...
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In this undated photo provided by Dan Olmstead in May 2017, diamondback moths mate on a cabbage leaf. Researchers in a New York cabbage patch are planning the first release on American soil of insects genetically engineered to die before they can reproduce. It’s a pesticide-free attempt to control invasive diamondback moths, a voracious consumer of cabbage, broccoli and other crucifer crops that’s notorious for its ability to shrug off every new poison in the agricultural arsenal. (Dan Olmstead/Cornell via AP)
May 29, 2017 - 1:17 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Researchers in a New York cabbage patch are planning the first release on American soil of insects genetically engineered to die before they can reproduce. It's a pesticide-free attempt to control invasive diamondback moths, a voracious consumer of cabbage, broccoli and other...
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July 06, 2015 - 4:39 am
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Utibe Effiong, University of Michigan and Ramadhani Noor, Harvard University (THE CONVERSATION) According to the World Food Program, some 795 million people – one in nine people on...
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