Genetics

FILE - In this June 12, 2020, file photo, a health worker draws blood for COVID-19 antibody testing in Dearborn, Mich. A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients published Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in the New England Journal of Medicine suggests a person's blood type may have some influence on whether they develop severe disease. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
AP News
June 18, 2020 - 2:26 pm
A genetic analysis of COVID-19 patients suggests that blood type might influence whether someone develops severe disease. Scientists who compared the genes of thousands of patients in Europe found that those who had Type A blood were more likely to have severe disease while those with Type O were...
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June 16, 2020 - 12:18 pm
LONDON (AP) — A new study by Public Health England has confirmed that historic racism and social inequalities are contributing factors that increase the risk of black, Asian and minority communities contracting and dying from the coronavirus in the U.K. Britain’s government has been under heavy...
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President Donald Trump answers questions from reporters during a event about protecting seniors, in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, April 30, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
AP News
April 30, 2020 - 10:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday speculated that China could have unleashed the coronavirus on the world due to some kind of horrible “mistake,” and his intelligence agencies said they are still examining a notion put forward by the president and aides that the pandemic may have...
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In this Feb. 7, 2019 photo provided by the Fred Hutch News Service, Trevor Bedford, a computational biologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, poses at the center in Seattle. Bedford is among a group of scientists who are contributing data to the decision-making in Washington state with regards to containing the new coronavirus outbreak. (Robert Hood/Fred Hutch News Service via AP)
March 11, 2020 - 8:19 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A U.S. scientist is helping public health authorities understand and track the coronavirus, turning up clues about how it arrived and spread through Washington state and beyond, including potentially seeding an outbreak on the Grand Princess cruise ship. Washington's governor banned...
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In this undated photo provided by the Oregon Health & Science University on Wednesday, March 4, 2020, Dr. Mark Pennesi, who leads OHSU's involvement in the trial, center right, looks on as staff at school's Casey Eye Institute perform the first-ever in vivo CRISPR gene edit procedure for the BRILLIANCE clinical trial in Portland, on a patient who had an inherited form of blindness. It may take up to a month to see if it worked to restore vision. (Kristyna Wentz-Graff/OHSU via AP)
March 04, 2020 - 2:48 pm
Scientists say they have used the gene editing tool CRISPR inside someone's body for the first time, a new frontier for efforts to operate on DNA, the chemical code of life, to treat diseases. A patient recently had it done at the Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University in...
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FILE - In this Aug. 14, 2018 file photo, a doctor looks at a PET brain scan at the Banner Alzheimers Institute in Phoenix. Two experimental drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people who are virtually destined to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age because of rare gene flaws. The results announced Monday, Feb. 10, 2020, are another disappointment for the approach that scientists have focused on for many years -- trying to remove a harmful protein that builds up in the brains of people with the disease. (AP Photo/Matt York, File)
February 10, 2020 - 8:04 am
Two experimental drugs failed to prevent or slow mental decline in a study of people who are virtually destined to develop Alzheimer's disease at a relatively young age because they inherited rare gene flaws. The results announced Monday are another disappointment for the approach that scientists...
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In this photo made available by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch via Twitter on Dec. 26, 2019, she and Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano pose for a photo with a cookie baked on the International Space Station. Researchers want to inspect the handful of chocolate chip cookies baked by astronauts in a special Zero G oven. (NASA via AP)
January 07, 2020 - 11:55 am
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The first batch of space-baked cookies is back on Earth, along with muscle-bound “mighty” mice and other space station experiments. SpaceX provided the ride home Tuesday, a month after its Dragon capsule arrived at the International Space Station. The capsule parachuted...
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In this Oct. 10, 2018, photo, Chinese scientist He Jiankui speaks during an interview at his laboratory in Shenzhen in southern China's Guangdong province. Chinese state media says the researcher He has been sentenced to three years for practicing medicine illegally. He Jiankui was also fined 3 million yuan. Two others were also sentenced on the same charge. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)
December 30, 2019 - 4:31 pm
BEIJING (AP) — A Chinese scientist who set off an ethical debate with claims that he had made the world's first genetically edited babies was sentenced Monday to three years in prison because of his research, state media said. He Jiankui, who was convicted of practicing medicine without a license,...
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An unmodified, open-pollinated American chestnut bur grows on a tree at the State University of New York's College of Environmental Science & Forestry Lafayette Road Experiment Station in Syracuse, N.Y., Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The ESF American Chestnut Research & Restoration Project researchers have been able to add a gene to American chestnuts that give the trees resistance to a blight that decimated the trees in the 20th century. (AP Photo/Adrian Kraus)
November 06, 2019 - 4:22 pm
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Chestnuts harvested from high branches on a chilly fall morning look typical: they're marble sized, russet colored and nestled in prickly burs. But many are like no other nuts in nature. In a feat of genetic engineering, about half the chestnuts collected at this college...
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FILE- In this March 27, 2019, file photo, vials of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine sit in a cooler at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y. Research released on Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019, shows yet another reason to vaccinate children against measles. After a bout of measles, youngsters are more vulnerable to other germs _ from chickenpox to strep _ that they once could fend off. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
October 31, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Measles has a stealth side effect: New research shows it erases much of the immune system's memory of how to fight other germs, so children recover only to be left more vulnerable to bugs like flu or strep. Scientists dubbed the startling findings "immune amnesia." The body can...
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