Geology

FILE - This March 9, 2010, file photo shows a tanker truck passing the Chevron oil refinery in Richmond, Calif. A U.S. judge who held a hearing about climate change that received widespread attention has thrown out the underlying lawsuits that sought to hold big oil companies liable for the role of fossil fuels in the Earth's warming environment. Judge William Alsup in San Francisco said Monday, June 25, 2018, that Congress and the president, not a federal judge, were best suited to address fossil fuels' contribution to global warming. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
June 25, 2018 - 10:25 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A U.S. judge who held a hearing about climate change that received widespread attention ruled Monday that Congress and the president were best suited to address the contribution of fossil fuels to global warming, throwing out lawsuits that sought to hold big oil companies...
Read More
With members of the National Guard in the foreground, volcanic gases rise from active fissures near Pahoa, Hawaii on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Most of the nearby Hawaii Volcanoes National Park remains closed to visitors due to ongoing seismic activity and the possibility of an explosion at the summit. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
May 16, 2018 - 5:09 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Patricia Deter moved from Oregon to Hawaii to be closer to her two daughters, but the Kilauea volcano burned down her home only a month after she bought it. Now Deter and others who have recently lost homes to the lava-spewing mountain are on an urgent quest for answers about...
Read More
Visitors watch as steam and gas rise from Kilauea's summit crater in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Geologists warned Wednesday that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could erupt explosively and send boulders, rocks and ash into the air around its summit in the coming weeks. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
May 10, 2018 - 1:14 am
PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — Geologists warned Wednesday that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could erupt explosively and send boulders, rocks and ash into the air around its summit in the coming weeks. The risk will rise as lava drains from the summit crater down the flank of the volcano, and explosions could...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017, file photo, Earthquake and Volcano of the Korea Monitoring Division Director Ryoo Yong-gyu speaks to the media about North Korea's artificial earthquake with a map of the Korean peninsular in Seoul, South Korea. A study by Chinese geologists shows the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has collapsed under the stress of the explosions, rendering it unsafe for further testing and necessitating monitoring for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China may shed new light on North Korean President Kim Jong Un's announcement that his country was ceasing its testing program.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
April 26, 2018 - 4:51 am
BEIJING (AP) — Research by Chinese geologists suggests that the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has likely collapsed, rendering it unsafe for further testing and requiring that it be monitored for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the University of Science...
Read More
In this Tuesday, March 6, 2018 photo, University of Rhode Island graduate student in geological oceanography Loes van Dam, of Novato, Calif., uses a spoon to demonstrate characteristics of corn syrup near a tank of 2,000 pounds of the syrup in a lab, in Narragansett, R.I. During experiments, the syrup represents the Earth's mantle which melts to form magma at volcanoes and ridges, while slow-moving belts represent the drifting and shifting tectonic plates. Their intersection is the ocean ridge. One minute of each experiment equals more than 1 million years in time, to show how tectonic plates move mantel material on the ocean floor. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
March 20, 2018 - 12:12 am
NARRAGANSETT, R.I. (AP) — How has the Earth evolved, and what's in store for the future? It's a sticky question that has graduate student Loes van Dam covered in corn syrup by the end of a day in the lab. She thought using a computer model would be limiting. So she designed and built a large tank,...
Read More
FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, the intersection of 8th Street and Atlantic Avenue is flooded in Ocean City, N.J., after the storm surge from Superstorm Sandy flooded much of the town. New satellite research shows that global warming is making seas rise at an ever increasing rate. Scientists say melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica is speeding up sea level rise so that by the year 2100 on average oceans will be two feet higher than today, probably even more. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
February 12, 2018 - 4:22 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up the already fast pace of sea level rise, new satellite research shows. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today,...
Read More
In this photo provided by Santa Barbara County Fire Department, the main line of the Union Pacific Railroad through Montecito, Calif. is blocked with mudflow and debris due to heavy rains on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. Several homes were swept away before dawn Tuesday when mud and debris roared into neighborhoods in Montecito from hillsides stripped of vegetation during a recent wildfire. (Mike Eliason/Santa Barbara County Fire Department via AP)
January 09, 2018 - 7:28 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Torrents like the ones that carved deadly and destructive paths through Montecito, California, during a powerful storm early are commonly described as mudslides, but geologists and emergency workers call them debris flows. Debris flows pose a significant threat when rain falls in...
Read More
This April, 2017, photo provided by the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys shows geologist Katreen Wikstrom Jones using an avalanche probe to measure snow depth at Thompson Pass, Alaska. Researchers in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska are looking for backcountry enthusiasts who want to aid a science mission. A program funded by NASA is recruiting citizen scientists to measure snow levels in mountain terrain. (Gabriel Wolken/Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys via AP)
January 05, 2018 - 1:40 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — America's space agency wants you to head for the mountains with a smartphone and a measuring stick. NASA's earth science arm is funding research that recruits citizen scientists on skis, snowshoes and snowmobiles to measure snow depth in backcountry locations of the Pacific...
Read More
This Dec. 21, 2016 photo shows the eastern Sierra Nevada, with Mt. Whitney, the second-highest peak in the U.S., the largest of three pinnacles at center, near Lone Pine, Calif. Loss of water from rocks during drought caused California's Sierra Nevada to rise nearly an inch in height from October 2011 to October 2015, according to a new NASA study made public Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. The study also found that in the following two years of increased snow and rain, the rocks in the range regained about half as much water as was lost during the drought and the return of the weight caused the height of the mountains to fall about half an inch. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
December 13, 2017 - 8:13 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Loss of water from rocks during drought caused California's Sierra Nevada to rise nearly an inch (2.5 centimeters) in height from October 2011 to October 2015, according to a new NASA study made public Wednesday. The study also found that in the following two years of increased...
Read More
November 18, 2017 - 6:03 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Boston University says it has found evidence that a geology professor sexually harassed a graduate student on a research trip in Antarctica more than 10 years ago. BU Provost Jean Morrison says in a letter sent Friday to faculty the findings follow a 13-month investigation into the...
Read More

Pages