Government surveillance

FILE - This Thursday, June 6, 2013 file photo shows the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations, raising questions about the viability of the program. The agency released a statement late Thursday, June 28, 2018, saying it started deleting the records in May after NSA analysts noted "technical irregularities in some data received from telecommunication service providers." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)
June 30, 2018 - 1:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations, raising questions about the viability of the program. The NSA's bulk collection of call records was...
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June 29, 2018 - 7:31 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The National Security Agency is deleting more than 685 million call records the government obtained since 2015 from telecommunication companies in connection with investigations, raising questions about the viability of the program. The NSA's bulk collection of call records was...
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June 24, 2018 - 2:36 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department says it has given House Republicans new classified information related to the Russia investigation after lawmakers had threatened to hold officials in contempt of Congress or even impeach them. A spokeswoman for House Speaker Paul Ryan said Saturday that the...
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FILE- In this May 8, 2018, file photo, Google CEO Sundar Pichai speaks at the Google I/O conference in Mountain View, Calif. Google pledges that it will not use artificial intelligence in applications related to weapons or surveillance, part of a new set of principles designed to govern how it uses AI. Those principles, released by Pichai, commit Google to building AI applications that are "socially beneficial," that avoid creating or reinforcing bias and that are accountable to people. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
June 07, 2018 - 9:08 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google pledged Thursday that it will not use artificial intelligence in applications related to weapons, surveillance that violates international norms, or that works in ways that go against human rights. It planted its ethical flag on use of AI just days confirming it would...
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FILE - In this file image made from video released by WikiLeaks on Oct. 11, 2013, former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden speaks in Moscow. Snowden blew the lid off U.S. government surveillance methods five years ago. The 34-year-old is living in exile in Russia, but intelligence chiefs complain that revelations from the trove of classified documents he disclosed keep trickling out. (AP Photo, File)
June 04, 2018 - 12:34 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Whistleblower or traitor, leaker or public hero? National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden blew the lid off U.S. government surveillance methods five years ago, but intelligence chiefs complain that revelations from the trove of classified documents he disclosed are still...
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FILE - In this Feb. 14, 2015, file photo, Edward Snowden appears on a live video feed broadcast from Moscow at an event sponsored by ACLU Hawaii in Honolulu. Snowden blew the lid off U.S. government surveillance methods five years ago. The 34-year-old is living in exile in Russia, but intelligence chiefs complain that revelations from the trove of classified documents he disclosed keep trickling out.(AP Photo/Marco Garcia, File)
June 03, 2018 - 11:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Whistleblower or traitor, leaker or public hero? National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden blew the lid off U.S. government surveillance methods five years ago, but intelligence chiefs complain that revelations from the trove of classified documents he disclosed are still...
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FILE - In this March 12, 2015, file photo, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle. While the Seattle Police Department bars officers from using real-time facial recognition in body camera video, privacy activists are concerned that a proliferation of the technology could turn the cameras into tools of mass surveillance. The ACLU and other organizations on Tuesday, May 22, 2018, asked Amazon to stop selling its facial-recognition tool, called Rekognition, to law enforcement agencies. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
May 22, 2018 - 4:46 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union and other privacy advocates are asking Amazon to stop marketing a powerful facial recognition tool to police, saying law enforcement agencies could use the technology to "easily build a system to automate the identification and tracking of anyone."...
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FBI Director Christopher Wray, right, leaves the White House, Monday, May 21, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
May 21, 2018 - 8:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Ratcheting up pressure on the Russia investigation, the White House announced Monday that top FBI and Justice Department officials have agreed to meet with congressional leaders and "review" highly classified information the lawmakers have been seeking on the handling of the probe...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2017, file photo Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, left, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, and Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee speak after closed meeting in Washington. The Republican-led House intelligence committee on April 27, 2018, officially declared the end of its Russia probe, saying in its final report that it found no evidence that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia in the 2016 presidential campaign. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
April 27, 2018 - 9:05 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led House intelligence committee on Friday released a lengthy report concluding it found no evidence that Donald Trump's campaign colluded with Russia in the 2016 presidential campaign, drawing praise from the president and rebuttals from Democrats. The report caps...
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FILE - In this April 3, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks at a news conference at the EPA in Washington. New internal documents say a sweep for hidden listening devices in Pruitt’s office was shoddy and wasn’t properly certified under U.S. government practices (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
April 23, 2018 - 5:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Internal documents from the Environmental Protection Agency say a sweep for hidden listening devices requested by Administrator Scott Pruitt for his office was conducted with shoddy methods and didn't meet U.S. government standards. The records obtained by congressional Democrats...
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