Habitat destruction

FILE - This Nov. 1, 2016, file photo, provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shows Debra Hill weighing a New Mexico meadow jumping mouse, which was trapped during survey efforts on the Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, N.M. Environmentalists say U.S. land managers are failing to keep livestock and wild horses out of streams and other wetlands in Arizona's White Mountains, resulting in damage to habitat that a rare species of mouse depends on. They are suing in federal court. The battle over the New Mexico meadow jumping mouse has been ongoing for years. The mouse was listed as an endangered species in 2014. (Stacey Stanford/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
February 21, 2020 - 12:58 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Environmentalists have accused U.S. land managers of failing to keep livestock and wild horses out of streams and other wetlands in Arizona's White Mountains, resulting in damage to habitat required by a rare mouse species found only in the Southwest. The lawsuit filed...
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FILE - In this July 29, 2019, file photo, a monarch butterfly rests on a plant at Abbott's Mill Nature Center in Milford, Del. The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remained critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday, Jan. 23, 2020, showed. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 23, 2020 - 9:09 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The western monarch butterfly population wintering along California's coast remains critically low for the second year in a row, a count by an environmental group released Thursday showed. The count of the orange-and-black insects by the Xerces Society, a nonprofit...
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This December 2019 photo provided by Guy Ballard shows a male brush-tailed rock wallaby eating supplementary food researchers provided in the Oxley Wild Rivers National Park in New South Wales, Australia. Before this fire season, scientists estimated there were as few as 15,000 left in the wild. Now recent fires in a region already stricken by drought have burned through some of their last habitat, and the species is in jeopardy of disappearing, Ballard said. (Guy Ballard/NSW DPI - UNE via AP)
January 18, 2020 - 7:35 am
Australia’s unprecedented wildfires season has so far charred 40,000 square miles (104,000 square kilometers) of brushland, rainforests, and national parks — killing by one estimate more than a billion wild animals. Scientists fear some of the island continent’s unique and colorful species may not...
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FIEL - In this image made from video taken on Dec. 22, 2019, and provided by Oakbank Balhannah CFS, a koala drinks water from a bottle given by a firefighter in Cudlee Creek, South Australia. Thousands of koalas are feared to have died in a wildfire-ravaged area north of Sydney, further diminishing Australia's iconic marsupial, while the fire danger accelerated Saturday, Dec. 28, 2019 in the country’s east as temperatures soared. (Oakbank Balhannah CFS via AP, File)
December 28, 2019 - 5:53 am
PERTH, Australia (AP) — Thousands of koalas are feared to have died in a wildfire-ravaged area north of Sydney, further diminishing Australia's iconic marsupial, while the fire danger increased in the country’s east on Saturday as temperatures soared. The mid-northern coast of New South Wales was...
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In this Dec. 11, 2019 photo, Kevin Dunn, who fishes off the coasts of Oregon and Washington, holds an aurora rockfish at a processing facility in Warrenton, Oregon. A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the U.S. West Coast as regulators in January 2020 are scheduled to reopen a large area off the coasts of Oregon and California to groundfish bottom trawling fishing less than two decades after authorities closed huge stretches of the Pacific Ocean due to the species' depletion. (AP Photo/Gillian Flaccus)
December 26, 2019 - 12:34 pm
WARRENTON, Ore. (AP) — A rare environmental success story is unfolding in waters off the U.S. West Coast. After years of fear and uncertainty, bottom trawler fishermen — those who use nets to scoop up rockfish, bocaccio, sole, Pacific Ocean perch and other deep-dwelling fish — are making a comeback...
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FILE - This Sept. 5, 2006, file photo, provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows a bearded seal in Kotzebue, Alaska. A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species found in Alaska. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday, Nov. 25, 2019, it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump administration to issue a critical habitat rule for ringed and bearded seals. The Center for Biological Diversity sued in June because no critical habitat had been designated. (Michael Cameron/NOAA Fisheries Service via AP, file)
November 25, 2019 - 8:15 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A federal agency will decide by September how much ocean and coast in northern Alaska will be designated as critical habitat for two ice seal species. The Center for Biological Diversity announced Monday it had reached an agreement with the Commerce Department for the Trump...
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FILE - This Feb. 9, 2016, file photo shows ice forming on pipelines built near the Colville-Delta 5 field, or as it's more commonly known, CD5, drilling site on Alaska's North Slope. The Trump administration will consider a new management plan and expanded oil drilling for the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, an Indiana-size area that former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar characterized as an "iconic place on our Earth." The Bureau of Land Management announced Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019, it will take public comment through Jan. 21 on four alternatives for the reserve in northern Alaska. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen,File)
November 21, 2019 - 6:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The Trump administration will consider a new management plan and expanded oil drilling for the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska, an Indiana-size area that former Interior Secretary Ken Salazar characterized as an “iconic place on our Earth.” The Bureau of Land Management...
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FILE - In this May 1, 2015 file photo, a dunes sagebrush lizard is shown. The dunes sagebrush lizard is found among the dunes straddling New Mexico and West Texas in one of the nation's richest oil basins and is at the center of a new lawsuit. Environmentalists want the federal government to add the lizard to the endangered species list. The fight stretches back to the Bush and Obama administrations and could affect part of the multibillion-dollar energy industry in the Permian Basin. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
October 01, 2019 - 6:06 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A small lizard found among the dunes straddling New Mexico and West Texas in one of the nation's richest oil basins is at the center of a legal complaint filed Tuesday. Environmentalists want the U.S. government to add the lizard to the endangered species list as part of a...
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September 25, 2019 - 12:04 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It will be up to a federal appeals court to decide whether tens of thousands of acres in New Mexico should be reserved as critical habitat for the endangered jaguar. The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Denver is scheduled to hear arguments Wednesday from...
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This undated photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a Paiute cutthroat trout. For the first time in nearly a century, the California trout species will swim in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and removal of its threatened status. About 30 Paiute cutthroat trout will be plucked Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019 from Coyote Valley Creek and hauled in cans strapped to pack mules about two miles (3.2 kilometers) to be dumped back into a stretch Silver King Creek in Alpine County's Long Valley, where the shimmering species glided through the cold water for thousands of years. (California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP)
September 18, 2019 - 11:02 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — For the first time in nearly a century, a rare California trout species is swimming in a mountain creek that is its native habitat, marking a major milestone that conservationists hope will lead to a thriving population and removal of its threatened status. About 30 Paiute...
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