Hazardous waste

Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 2:22 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, according to federal regulators. The Environmental Protection Agency...
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Energy Secretary Rick Perry pauses while speaking during a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 26, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 26, 2019 - 1:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Energy Secretary Rick Perry on Tuesday defended the Trump administration's plans to collect and store nuclear waste from around the country in a site northwest of Las Vegas, saying that the current system of scattered storage sites in dozens of states was unacceptable. Perry held...
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March 26, 2019 - 11:42 am
SAN ONOFRE, Calif. (AP) — The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is fining the Southern California Edison utility $116,000 for violations in its handling of nuclear canisters at the shuttered San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. The decision announced Monday in an online town hall meeting involves the...
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FILE - The first load of nuclear waste arrives in this March 26, 1999 file photo, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Carlsbad, N.M., from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Twenty years and more than 12,380 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era waste from decades of bomb-making and nuclear research across the U.S. have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility. (AP Photo/Thomas Herbert)
March 23, 2019 - 6:53 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It wasn't long after the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan and World War II ended that the United States began to realize it had to do something with the waste that was being generated by defense-related nuclear research and bomb-making that would continue through the Cold...
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FILE - In this April 8, 1998, file photo, a worker drives a cart through a tunnel inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant No. 2, 150 feet below the surface near Carlsbad, N.M. Twenty years and more than 12,330 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era radioactive waste from decades of bomb-making and research have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility and not without issues. (AP Photo/Eric Draper, File)
March 23, 2019 - 6:51 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — In a remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment. Twenty years and more than 12,380...
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In this Thursday, March 21, 2019, photo, fires burn at the site of a factory explosion in a chemical industrial park in Xiangshui County of Yancheng in eastern China's Jiangsu province. The local government reports the death toll in an explosion at a chemical plant in eastern China has risen with dozens killed and more seriously injured. (Chinatopix via AP)
March 22, 2019 - 9:32 pm
BEIJING (AP) — A massive explosion at a chemical plant in eastern China with a long record of safety violations has killed at least 62 people and injured hundreds of others, 90 of them seriously. The death toll appeared likely to rise still further, with another 28 people still listed as missing,...
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In this photo taken in 2018 and provided by Pavel Otdelnov, A view of an abandoned industrial building of the factory "Zarya" in Dzerzhinsk, is on display at an exhibition in Moscow, Russia. Pavel Otdelnov, a Russian artist who grew up in Dzerzhinsk, the center of the nation's chemical industries 355 kilometers (220 miles) east of Moscow, focused on the city, one of the most polluted in Russia, in his new 'Promzona' art show. (Pavel Otdelnov, Photo via AP)
February 20, 2019 - 7:28 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Pavel Otdelnov recalls how as a child he saw his mother boil his parents' bedding every day. His father worked in the factories of Dzerzhinsk, the center of Soviet chemical manufacturing, and the chlorine and phosgene that yellowed the sheets seeped through protective gear into his...
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FILE - In this Sept. 29, 1994 file photo, a CSX Train with spent nuclear fuel passes through Florence, S.C., on its way to Savannah River Site Weapons Complex near Aiken S.C. Nevada and South Carolina are jostling for a home-field advantage of sorts in a federal court battle that could result in a metric ton of weapons-grade plutonium being stored 70 miles from Las Vegas. (Jeff Chatlosh/The Morning News via AP, File)
January 30, 2019 - 9:24 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Energy revealed on Wednesday that it secretly shipped weapons-grade plutonium from South Carolina to a nuclear security site in Nevada months ago despite the state's protests. The Justice Department notified a federal judge in Reno that the government...
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FILE - In this March 6, 2013 file photo, workers are shown at the 'C' Tank Farm at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, near Richland, Wash. Conservation groups are alarmed by the Trump administration's proposal to rename some radioactive waste left from the production of nuclear weapons to make it cheaper and easier to achieve permanent disposal. The U.S. Department of Energy is considering a change in its legal definition of high-level radioactive waste, which is stored at places like the Hanford. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
December 10, 2018 - 3:11 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — The Trump administration wants to reclassify some radioactive waste left from the production of nuclear weapons to lower its threat level and make disposal cheaper and easier. The proposal by the U.S. Department of Energy would lower the status of some high-level radioactive...
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In this photo taken Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018 Jennifer Christensen sorts through items found in a safe at the remains of her home in Paradise, Calif. Christensen and her 2-year-old son, Avery, moved to Paradise about a year ago. Upon returning to what was once home, she found a safe with melted jewelry in it. Christensen is not sure of her future plans but feels so much loyalty to her town that she recently had a tattoo done on her upper arm that reads, "Love is thicker than smoke," and below that, "Paradise Strong." (AP Photo/Don Thompson)
December 06, 2018 - 1:49 am
PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — Nearly four weeks after the devastating blaze leveled her town, Jennifer Christensen was allowed back to return to her home in Paradise, where the first thing she saw was her son's charred tricycle in the front yard. Christensen was among hundreds of residents who were...
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