Health disparities

Medical personnel prepare to test hundreds of people lined up in vehicles Saturday, June 27, 2020, in Phoenix's western neighborhood of Maryvalefor free COVID-19 tests organized by Equality Health Foundation, which focuses on care in underserved communities. As coronavirus infections explode in states like Arizona and Florida, people in communities of color are fighting to get tested. Public health experts say wider testing helps people in underserved neighborhoods and is key to controlling a pandemic. (AP Photo/Matt York)
July 06, 2020 - 9:53 am
PHOENIX (AP) — A Latino cook whose co-worker got COVID-19 waited in his truck for a free swab at a rare testing event in a low-income neighborhood in Phoenix. A Hispanic tile installer queued up after two weeks of self-isolation while his father battled the coronavirus in intensive care. He didn't...
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In this June 5, 2020 photo provided by the Mountain Area Health Education Center, physicians, residents and staff from the facility in Asheville, N.C., take a knee to show support for renewed calls for racial justice after the police killing of George Floyd. Government statistics from late January through May 30 suggest an increase in U.S. deaths from chronic diseases compared with historical trends. They include 7,000 excess deaths from hypertension, about 4,000 from diabetes and 3,000 from strokes -- all conditions that disproportionately affect Blacks, although the data don’t include race. (Brenda Benik/MAHEC via AP)
July 05, 2020 - 10:07 am
Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately. They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And...
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FILE - In this March 30, 2020, file photo, Administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Seema Verma speaks about the coronavirus in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. The government says Blacks are nearly four times more likely than whites to be hospitalized with COVID-19 among people with Medicare. The analysis from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services also found that Hispanics were about twice as likely as whites to be hospitalized. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
June 22, 2020 - 8:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Blacks were nearly four times more likely than whites to be hospitalized with COVID-19 among people with Medicare, the government said Monday. The analysis from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services also found that having advanced kidney disease was an even more...
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FILE - In this May 18, 2020, file photo, Belvin Jefferson White poses with a portrait of her father Saymon Jefferson at Saymon's home in Baton Rouge, La. Belvin recently lost both her father and her uncle, Willie Lee Jefferson, to COVID-19. African Americans are disproportionately likely to say a family member or close friend has died of COVID-19 or respiratory illness since March, according to a series of surveys conducted since April that lays bare how black Americans have borne the brunt of the pandemic. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
June 15, 2020 - 12:29 pm
DETROIT (AP) — African Americans are disproportionately likely to say a family member or close friend has died of COVID-19 or respiratory illness since March, according to a series of surveys conducted since April that lays bare how black Americans have borne the brunt of the pandemic. Eleven...
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Mourners stand by the casket of veteran Mary Foley, Wednesday, April 8, 2020, in Malden, Mass. Foley, who died at the age of 93, served in the U.S. Air Force, including WWII. Due to the coronavirus crisis, she cannot be given a formal military funeral. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
April 08, 2020 - 8:48 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Even as coronavirus deaths mount across Europe and New York, the U.S. and other countries are starting to contemplate an exit strategy and thinking about a staggered and carefully calibrated easing of restrictions designed to curb the scourge. “To end the confinement, we’re not...
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Mayor Lori Lightfoot announces the "We Are Not Playing" campaign during a press conference at Soldier Field, Monday morning, April 6, 2020, in Chicago. The city is launching a health campaign focused on the city's black and brown communities, following a media report highlighting the disproportionate number of black residents among those who have died of COVID-19 complications in the city. (Ashlee Rezin Garcia/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
AP News
April 06, 2020 - 6:02 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago's mayor pledged an aggressive public health campaign aimed at the city's black and brown communities Monday amid alarm that an overwhelming number of African American residents were among the people to die of COVID-19 in early data. Black residents accounted for 72% of deaths...
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In this March 26, 2020, photo, Rahmell Peeples walks in his neighborhood during an interview in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Peebles, who is skeptical of what he hears from white-run media and government, didn’t see the need for alarm over the new coronavirus. Peebles is one of roughly 40 million black Americans deciding minute by minute whether to put their faith in the government and medicine during the coronavirus pandemic. “I’ve just been conditioned not to trust,” Peebles said. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
April 05, 2020 - 12:49 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Just as the new coronavirus was declared a global pandemic, gym members in New York City frantically called the fitness center where Rahmell Peebles worked, asking him to freeze their memberships. Peebles, a 30-year-old black man who’s skeptical of what he hears from the news media...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, March 11, 2020, file photo, Rep. Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., and other House Democrats arrive to meet with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democratic lawmakers are calling out an apparent lack of racial data that they say is needed to monitor and address disparities in the national response to the coronavirus outbreak. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna Pressley say in a letter to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar dated Friday, March 27, 2020, that comprehensive demographic data on people who are tested or treated for the coronavirus does not exist. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 30, 2020 - 7:13 pm
Democratic lawmakers are calling out an apparent lack of racial data that they say is needed to monitor and address disparities in the national response to the coronavirus outbreak. In a letter sent Friday to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Rep. Ayanna...
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Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., arrives to speak during a campaign rally in Springfield, Va., Saturday, Feb. 29, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
March 01, 2020 - 8:02 am
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) — It isn't easy being a Bernie Sanders supporter in a conservative state like Oklahoma. Travis Wyman, a 40-year-old construction worker and online “social justice warrior,” says he and other Sanders fans can hear “fear-mongering words” like socialist and communist thrown at...
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Democratic presidential candidate former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg, center, takes park in a roundtable discussing health equity with Stephania Priester, left, and Jalen Elrod, right, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020, at the Nicholtown Missionary Baptist Church in Greenville, S.C. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
February 27, 2020 - 9:02 pm
GREENVILLE, S.C. (AP) — A bit hoarse and with an occasional cough, Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg returned to the political fray Thursday, resuming a whirlwind schedule after taking a half-day to rest after getting hit with a bad cold. “Excuse me, I've had my own health moment,”...
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